Hot answers tagged

26

If the goal of the scene is to show why a person decides what he or she decides, then you only give the detail necessary to demonstrate that. If part of what changes Adam's mind afterwards is the way she looks, you need to focus on her appearance and not the act. ("He watched her face change as he slid into her" or "his eyes roamed hungrily over her breasts"...


24

You could be vague and mention him feeling his trousers or pants "getting tighter", or something of the like. It's pretty much the standard imagery used to represent an erection without actually mentioning anything, and it's also a quite accurate physical description that your male readers will have no problems identifying. For pretty much the same reasons, ...


23

In this day and age should the definition / categorisation of erotica be revised? No. Erotica is a story intended to titillate, it is intended to aid imagination for the purpose of masturbation. Or more generally, for the primary purpose of creating sexual excitement. If a story contains elements like that, it is probably erotica, even if there is a story ...


20

Liquid's answer is good, but I would like to specifically focus on one way of doing it; chiefly, mention the awkward feelings one gets in such situations. Men, especially young men, aren't exactly comfortable with inappropriately-timed erections, so given this is from the male's perspective, you have a lot of fun ways to play this off. For example: Myrtle ...


19

You didn't say who lost their minds, but your question implies that it was wannabe writers. Did you read this to a writers' group? It is quite explicit erotically, and it's not right to assume that everybody should be comfortable reading it or hearing about it. Labeling them "prudes" says that there's something wrong with their attitude. It would show ...


14

First of all: it's your choice how far you want to go into detail. When two characters having sex is a plot point in a story which is not supposed to be erotic or not even romantic, a detailed description of the deed can seem out of place, especially when you aren't really comfortable writing it. This can go so far as to just imply that sex has taken ...


10

This question borders on "what to write" instead of "how to write", so I will concentrate on the latter. If your character has masturbated, he has had erections. Probably every day, since teen age boys do. If he is "reserved" and doesn't like to think in crude terms, then he will have invented his own words for this phenomenon. Changing "masturbation" to "...


10

Why the outrage? Well, first off, I think you overestimate the acceptability of showing masturbation in a TV show. Even showing a character going through the motions of it is fairly crass, and something I would expect from an It's Always Sunny in Philadelphia-type show. Still, I doubt you'd get the reaction you're describing from a scene where a woman ...


9

Don't mention the erection at all. As he is about to be smothered in breasts, switch to descriptions of everything he is using to mentally distract himself from having a sexual reaction. Perhaps, make it more of a "battle", attacking one of his senses at a time. First the image of her breasts up close which he fights back with other visual imagery that is ...


9

In this case, recognizing the problem -- recognizing that you want a narrative arc, that something should be intensifying beyond the scope of a single sexual encounter -- is also half the solution. Once you know you want the story to have stakes beyond "when will they have sex," all you really need to do is decide what those stakes are. And the good news is ...


8

A good erotica should not have crazy sex on page three, or at least the sex that the reader is emotionally invested in. After all, that would (figuratively and literally) be blowing your load way too freaking early. With erotica, treat it as a set of teases and growing anticipation; establish a relationship between the sexees that's compelling, and make the ...


8

This is an extremely good question and I would love to offer some advice from other writers I've found helpful! If you are ESL or new at writing romance scenes, your initial romantic scenes definitely have a high potential for being "cringe," and it's often difficult to pinpoint exactly why or where you went wrong. It's usually not because you aren'...


7

The best thing you can do in this scenario is read - prolifically - in your genre. Research what works for you, what gets your juices flowing ( so to speak :) ) and what reads like nails down a blackboard. Reading takes time though, so if you want to read prolifically and have the funds to do it, sign up for an audiobook site. I use Audible. You will get ...


7

The possibilities are endless: "Chubby Checker is doing his stand up routine" "From little acorns, mighty oaks do grow." "You know The Lark Ascending by Vaughan Williams? Well, the lark has ascended." Pretty much anything in that situation that a young man says, which refers to anything rising or growing, is going to be construed as being a reference to ...


7

(1) from the first desire to consummation or (2) from loveless sex to romantic love or (3) from a lack of sexual experience to sexual empowerment – what can cause conflict? I think what you need is an alternative to a plotted novel; these are "character-driven" novels, in which a character may not have an antagonist, exactly, except for the ...


6

One way is to allow yourself to write a crappy first draft and then fix it in editing. A lot of authors go that way. They just keep writing, not looking too much at what they've written in previous chapters. Their editing work then turns into gold digging where you grab a bunch of muck and rinse away a lot to find the golden nuggets that gets to be ...


6

"I write stories for adults only." or "I write erotica." It all works. There's enough out there that is NC-17 or even a hard R, or the book/TV/comic equivalent, that people get it if you say your work isn't appropriate for kids. Also, if you don't even know if your work is smut or erotica or porn, which are all different things! You're going to ...


6

Some background. Erotica, as a genre, means that mind-blowing sex is the point of the story. If you take away the sex and the story just isn't interesting, or no longer has a point, then it's erotica. Otherwise it just has erotic themes. So why the outrage? Well. I have only theories, but here they are all the same. First. 'traumatic event eviscerated ...


5

Anne Rice wrote four erotic novels using pseudonyms -- Exit to Eden under the pen name Anne Rampling and the Sleeping Beauty trilogy under the name A.N. Roquelaire -- and they don't seem to have hurt her career.


5

Allow me to start with conflict. There are authoritative definitions of conflict out there, but let's keep it simple: conflict is an obstacle. Typically, a character has an objective and the obstacles that lie in the way represent the conflict. Now that we have conflict defined, let's look at a purely erotic storyline. If I may be so bold, I'll bring ...


4

I often think of what Ira Glass says in this video about the gap between your work and the work that you admire. Here's the quote in text: Nobody tells this to people who are beginners. I wish someone told me. All of us who do creative work, we get into it because we have good taste. But there is this gap. For the first couple years you make ...


4

To clarify on the alternative method that the others have posted: instead of writing the erotic scene, build up to it and fade to black just before it starts. Leave the act itself to the imagination of the reader. The problem with erotic scenes is that it's easy to write a scene, but it's hard to write it well, and it's even harder to write it so that it ...


4

One quite effective alternative is: storiesonline They have the option to also post non-erotica, and have a very effective categorisation tool. You can actually find writing on a reasonable breadth of topics here, although the primary focus is erotica. Another place to post original work online is: fictionpress They don't appear to have an erotica ...


3

I'll take a different tack on this. Read My Answer here that goes into the Three Act Structure in some detail. Basically, you increase erotic tension the same way you increase any story tension: What you need is a good story that demands intercourse in order for the protagonist to get what they want. Now, in all my answers (and work) my MC are females (...


3

Competition Our manly stud has a rival who is equally manly and studly, but downwardly mobile. Rather than being born in the manor, he was relegated to the stables. Wait, did they have the same father? If so they are true equals in one sense. (Or it is reversed and the rival is wealthy.) Alternately, the innocent lamb is competing against a trampy vixen ...


3

The most important thing is to understand why the sex scene is in your story. Are you trying to inform the reader about the characters' emotional states? Are the things they do during the scene going to be plot relevant? Are you trying to entertain or titillate the readers? Once you know what you are trying to accomplish, you can figure out how you will ...


2

I can't write the direct and explicit scene, and I don't think they are necessary. And really, as a reader I feel like they are 'telling' me something and hoping I will translate that into character feelings and sensations: In your example, shouldn't that movement produce some sort of feeling in him, or in her, or in both of them? I say forget what is ...


2

Eh, it's almost impossible to sell screenplays in general. That you have a screenplay for a movie that would be R or NC-17 moves it from "almost" impossible to "very nearly" impossible. You know how many movies were released in 2013 with a NC-17 rating? Two, Blue Is The Warmest Color and something called Lucky Bastard. Which might not sound like much, but ...


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