15

Who told you it's bad to rewrite a story? That's terrible advice. No one ever publishes something without a ton of rewrites, and many well-known writers revisit similar themes over and over. It took me a long, unproductive time to realize that writing is a process, and that you have to embrace it. You only get better by doing it. You can't produce something ...


7

This is an awesome question and there are a lot of great ways to do this! Here are a few tips I've received from fellow authors that I really like. Consider their occupation, upbringing and background A computer scientist will speak differently, and make different references and cultural allusions, than an archaeologist or a biologist. Your grizzled ...


5

Suspense is created through anticipation of events outside of characters' control. Suspense is most common in horror/thriller genres, but generally, suspense can be positive or comedic and be suitable in any kind of plot. The higher characters' stakes are for the event, the bigger is the suspense. However, the reader must be "invested" in ...


5

Lack of skill isn't a problem. Lack of skill can be improved by both practicing and revising; just like riding a bicycle, or conversing with people [which I certainly lack the skill]. As @Mary stated so succinctly, just "Write it". The writing process is a learning one. As you proceed typing at the computer (or writing on your notepad), you'll ...


5

The closest thing I can think of to what you're describing is writing prompts. They're short (maybe 40-50 words) and provide the seed of an idea, essentially just a premise that a writer can take as a starting point to create a story from. For examples of what I mean (and potentially even a place to post your own) there's a SubReddit here


5

I don't think you should feel ashamed of using Grammarly to correct mistakes. You should, however, take it with a grain of salt. Not because it makes a lot of mistakes, but because you wish to learn correct spelling, punctuation and grammar it suggests. So, instead of blindly clicking on the red line try to fix the mistakes on your own before going for its ...


4

The purpose of writing is not for you to be perfect, it is for your prose to be (close to) perfect. No writer ever spits out perfect prose on the first go. It just isn't possible. That is why the writing gods created the act of revising to move the imperfect closer to perfect. Grammarly is a useful tool in this process. So are dictionaries. So are beta ...


4

You have to realize that we do many types of writing for a book, and only some of those are meant for the reader. What you're doing right now is called worldbuilding. It's a very important part of your process, but it's only the first step. Once you completely understand all your characters, settings and plot, choose a point-of-view character, and go back ...


3

Yes, it's possible. While changing genres during a story can leave the audience feeling betrayed - they expected one thing but got something else entirely - but changing genres between stories gives you a chance to let your audience know in advance, through (depending on the medium) trailers, interviews, the front cover, etc. This will lessen the shock, and ...


3

Honestly, it isn't that much. There is only a single "she". I can see the repetitive "her"; but this isn't a big issue for my taste, at least not in this extract. However, you could try this: Clitter, clatter. The heavy metal case carrying her belongings rolled over the small divides in the polished white floor, sliding sideways with ...


2

Possibly, but not without resistance. Anytime something is successful, both the publisher and the audience will demand more of the same. Your best bet is to do some genre-blending in a way that brings something old and something new at the same time. For instance, if your first book is romantic-drama, your second could be action-drama. People will stick with ...


2

If the story won’t let you go then write it. By writing it, your skill will improve and you will find more tools. After writing my first manuscript, I put it away for a few months and wrote other stories and read popular books in the genre and books about different aspects of writing and story telling. Every story can be tightened. Expectations change, ...


1

Don't feel bad. Few people, if any, are perfect writers. As an editor, I'd rather fix spelling and grammar and other technical aspects of writing for someone who can tell a story well than struggle with a poor storyteller who is technically a good writer. For example, I'm a competent writer with a good handle on PUGS (punctuation, usage, grammar, and ...


1

Good grammar was created to help us communicate our ideas accurately and effectively. In general, using good grammar will improve your writing. In general, though, the perfect grammar community is just another religion designed to create a club from which they can exclude others to make themselves feel included. (Other such clubs are etiquette, Ivy League ...


1

Well, The sun shone, the grass grew, the waves crashed. It's odd advice from Chekov. The following are from Chekov's short story "The Witch": And the wind staggered like a drunkard. The snowdrifts were covered with a thin coating of ice; tears quivered on them and on the trees; I supposed he might be saying there's good and bad anthropomorphism.


1

When I started writing, I used to have these thoughts too. All my characters sound the bloody same. (Every time, I see the word 'Bloody', I am reminded of Ronald Weasley) First of all, it may not be the case. As the writer creating the story, you already know how it will map out and probably that's why everything seems to be in monotone. If your characters ...


1

Seen a lot of good answers here, but still not sure how directly they're addressing the concern of you 'spoiling' your story. IMHO there are two aspects to this; Structure/planning and descriptive style. For structure, Try thinking this way: the definition of a 'bad' or 'spoilt' story is one that doesn't 'go' anywhere or loses interest (this doesn't apply ...


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