6

You can carry the same subject through multiple actions in the same sentence without repeating "she" (or her name) over and over again; the subject in each additional clause should be clear to the reader. Something like: Jane opened her eyes and reached out toward her screeching alarm, fumbling as always to silence it before it woke the neighbor's ...


3

Depressed characters are still interesting characters, but you have to write them that way. Speaking as somebody who suffers from dips into depression, you're absolutely right that writing a depressed character effectively, in a way that's interesting to read, is very challenging. It echoes the real-world struggles many depressed people face, in that you don'...


2

Make the Scene Work Harder, or Cut it You can absolutely introduce a character for one scene. The real question is whether the scene is worthwhile as it is. You describe the scene as if all it does is world-building. I would either expand it or cut it. Scenes need to do multiple things at once. The most important thing I scene needs to do is provide a source ...


2

Write the first draft. Then go back and revise according to whether it sounds right, and all the pronouns have a clear referent. After you revise to make sure you have a coherent plot and clear characterization and a distinctive setting. This is because you could revise this passage twenty times to get the pronouns right, and then realize the whole thing has ...


2

This is going to come across as simplistic, but it seems to me that you have to have something to say and a reason to say it. Thus, you have to go back and ask the question, what are you trying to say. This is not easy and may take multiple revisions before you figure it out. But if you do not do it, your readers, equally confused, may decide to spend their ...


1

Why not simply a number of stout bandits standing across the breadth of the road holding pikes (or perhaps large pointed sticks) pointing towards the cart? Pikes/sticks are dug into the ground at the blunt end. Easy for a bandit group to make such a roadblock, conceivable that a determined rush could break through. One might object to the use of a felled ...


1

It depends. Did you say what you wanted that chapter to have in two pages effectively? If so, that’s great. It is really about how you feel with respect to what you’ve written with respect to length, in other words, do you feel that you could lengthen what you’ve written in two pages to fifteen? Or are you happy with what you could have said in fifteen but ...


1

I think this is a struggle for writers not just concerning depression, but emotions in general. In real life, moments where we pivot as people are few and far between. Most of the time change is more gradual. Often, especially with struggles like depression and addiction, we will gain ground, then lose it. However, I think sometimes it is okay to make such ...


1

In general, you don't. In a movie script, unless it is relevant to the plot, you do not mention the songs that are played/music that's running. This is a job for the film score and director, not the script. If, however, the song is relevant to the plot, then you can simply use capitalization, just like with all sound effects: Zach turns to the BOUNCER. ANNA'...


1

You’re human. Just use your real life experience to situations as a reference. In other words, use punctuation to highlight emotion. Punctuation may just be a conglomerate of symbols, but they exist to highlight a phenomenon we as humans undergo in real life. “Hey!” Is different from “hey…”, is it not? So this is one tip: use punctuation to your advantage. ...


1

As they say in show biz: There are no small parts, only small actors. Take this person and make their one line memorable. Think of it as a cameo by a famous actor past his or her prime.


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