62

'Publish' is a word with specific meaning and from the context of your question I can tell you're not looking to publish. You're looking to have your work printed. That can be done quite easily, if you have $39 to spare and live in the US. (I'm not affiliated with BookBaby and have never had them print a book. I can't say anything about the quality of their ...


57

It is most likely anecdotal evidence. There are always breakout successes where this worked - people published their story somewhere and it got big. 50 Shades of Grey comes to mind, which came out of a fanfic community and was already successful in that community and had a following before the marketing was cranked up. It's also a good example why I doubt ...


47

Unfortunately, the word count of your work means that traditional publishers will not be interested. Even well-established authors like Stephen King publish their novella-length work only as part of larger collections, not as stand-alone works. Also unfortunately, a self-published novella by an unknown author will vanish without a trace on Amazon, unless ...


40

Is there a practical, effective way to prevent this IP theft? Yes. As someone who has pirated countless books, I might give you some insight into my frame of mind. There's a very simple way you can counteract this "theft": Put a donation link on your website. You'd be surprised if I told you how many times I wanted to donate to an author after reading ...


30

TL;DR: No I'm not really versed in the world of writing, but I do know things about software engineering and delivering content. If you are just writing for fun and the royalties are a bonus, you can just leave it at that. If you want it to be more than a hobby, I think that's critically misunderstanding what these platforms are. Amazon, YouTube, Steam, ...


29

I would strongly advice against offering a "pre-release sample". Offering a first chapter or two for free to get your readers hooked before they have to pay is a nice touch in my opinion, but providing a portion of your novel before it is all finished sounds risky. What if you realize by the 80% mark that something is horribly broken in the beginning and you ...


29

Yes, this is relatively easy to do these days through Print On Demand services. One that I've personally used in the past is Lulu.com. Their user interface is easy, and their POD books are of comparable quality to what you would see from a traditional publisher. The price per book is also comparable to what you would pay retail for a standard book. They do ...


28

I will disagree with the advice you received. The vast majority of self-published fiction earns nothing, or at best some friend and family sympathy purchases. The case is even worse for un-marketed self-published fiction. To self-publish, you are responsible for developing the marketing materials and artwork, for figuring out where to post ads, for paying ...


21

Just to offer an old-school solution, you could always print and bind it yourself! Yeah, there's lots of services which can print on demand these days, but when I printed a book for a friend, they were not around. Whether you want to go through the effort to print and bind it yourself is really a matter of how you feel about the physical object you end up ...


19

Unlike the other answers, let me try to give you a practical, nuts and bolt answer. When you go to self-publish your book, either as an ebook(Amazon, Kobo, etc) or print(Createspace etc), you are asked to give an author name. This field is not automatically filled based on your registered name. So you can fill in any name you want in the author field. This ...


18

There is probably no stopping of file sharing in the modern world. But there is a chance we can make it cool to be backer and investor, sponsor and patron. Patreon, flattr, kickstarter, indiegogo and many other sites and services exist at this point and then I haven't even searched particularly notoriously after them the last year or so. There is a ...


17

To be honest, I think what he says is fairly ignorant. He has a big audience already, mainly due to putting in a LOT of effort and dedication for years to grow his online image and brand. When you've already got an audience, you've already got quite a network of potential customers. Without an existing audience and without marketing (i.e. letting other ...


17

It depends. Using Amazon's book store as an example: If your book is in an Amazon category that has very few books and the reader finds a poorly-done homemade cover that speaks to what they are interested in, they may click on it simply because there aren't many others to choose from. However, if your book is in a well-populated category, competing with ...


16

There is no way to track who buys your books on Amazon. In your books, give readers a way to connect with you. Links to your book/author/publisher web site. Link to a mailing list. Links to your social media accounts. An offer that they can sign up for (a free ebook version of the print book they bought, or a discount on another book, or a free short story ...


15

IANAL, and you should ask a lawyer (and in the future, please, never ever again sign a contract you do not understand), but for me it reads like this: You will retain all rights to the content of the Work. We do not own rights to your Work ... You haven't sold any rights. You still hold every right of your work. Which includes publishing it elsewhere. ...


15

Using a deliberately deceptive pen name is essentially a marker of fake authenticity. It can lead to success, but also criticism on the grounds of cultural appropriation. I would personally recommend against it. While not illegal, or even particularly uncommon, it strikes me as a little ethically suspect. There are two cases I would exempt from this ...


15

You need a website As a fiction author you should buy a web domain (URL) as close to your nom de plume as possible. Include contact info, and a professional bio. If you want a blog or some personal pages that's ok too, but primarily treat this webpage as a professional address, as if it's your booth at a writer's expo – a little more advertising and splash, ...


14

CreateSpace ISBNs are real, legitimate ISBNs. You can use them to distribute your book anywhere in the world. The key limitation is this: If your book has a CreateSpace ISBN, you must buy your copies from CreateSpace. That is, you can't use another printer to print books with an ISBN you got from CreateSpace. You can find the "details" here: https://www....


14

I've seen many novels with a table of contents, and many without. Whether it matters depends more on how you want to structure things, than on any actual rule. I've also seen novels with no actual chapters, just tens of thousands of words all in a row (broken into paragraphs, of course) -- and novels with chapters as short as half a page. What works is ...


13

I have sent eight books through CreateSpace this year, including one that I'm proofing right now. The only upfront cost is the printed proof copy, and you can forego that (though it is highly recommended). Proof Copy. CreateSpace requires that you proof your book. You may choose to do this entirely through their online proofing tool, in which case there ...


13

The form for filing copyright has fields for both "Author" (the person whose name is on the work) and "Copyright Claimant" (the person who is claiming the copyright). Under Author, there is an option to check "Pseudonymous" to indicate that the Author is a pen name. If the Copyright Claimant and the Author are different names, there is space on the form to ...


13

I've had very good luck with fiverr.com (yes, two r's). It is called "fiverr" because the artists are supposed to be able to do some (relatively small) thing for $5 US. I have zero financial interest in it, and I only recommend it because for me it has worked great. I've gotten over twenty pieces of art there, from about four different artists. You can ...


13

Am I to believe that the person will move on and not check it out simply because it was clearly homemade? Yes, believe that. Of course, believe that on average, you will still get some percentage of people that will click on it, but most people won't. The quality of the cover art influences the perception of quality of writing. Something that looks ...


12

My advice is to ignore the people that advocate writing a book in one month, or two, or three. Even with no other duties, it takes me at least six months to finish my fifth draft of a book, and I may spend another three months doing more drafts. I don't expect anybody else to follow my formula, it is based on my personal sensibilities and what I have found ...


12

I think this is a total myth. Even if the book is well written: If no one knows, that it exists, no one will buy it. Promotion is the way to tell the people "Hey, here I have a good novel and it might be exactly what you want". Normally people don't go through several dozens of books, to find anything that suits them well. Just think about yourself. If ...


11

If you publish the initial chapter, there's one thing you should make damn sure: That the readers are guaranteed to know up front that they are reading only a part of the story. Nothing puts you down more than if you expect to get the full story, and then detect that it's only a part, and you have to pay for the rest. This is true even if the author didn't ...


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