62

Leave it there, you can always come back to it later. If it stinks that bad, you may not want your name associated with it. I personally have dozens of things kept in a folder that will likely never see the light of day again. Every so often, I re-open them and see what was in there. Sometimes I am greatly surprised and pleased with what I find. Other times, ...


56

It is most likely anecdotal evidence. There are always breakout successes where this worked - people published their story somewhere and it got big. 50 Shades of Grey comes to mind, which came out of a fanfic community and was already successful in that community and had a following before the marketing was cranked up. It's also a good example why I doubt ...


41

You do not. Nowhere in Green Eggs and Ham does Dr. Seuss tell you that the whole thing is written using exactly 50 different words. It's an "Easter Egg" as @Alexander points out in a comment. It's for readers to notice, or learn about from others having noticed. An Easter egg is fun because the reader has a moment of "oh cool, it really is only 50 ...


32

You certainly can --someone will always be willing to take your money --but there are multiple reasons this is a bad idea: 1) You're putting the cart before the horse: You're managing a writing career before you've produced much at all in the way of writing. Until you've done some more writing, gotten some feedback, and attempted some sales on your own, ...


30

TL;DR: No I'm not really versed in the world of writing, but I do know things about software engineering and delivering content. If you are just writing for fun and the royalties are a bonus, you can just leave it at that. If you want it to be more than a hobby, I think that's critically misunderstanding what these platforms are. Amazon, YouTube, Steam, ...


26

This is literary science-fiction. I identified it by taking the genre it definitely must fit in, and then looking for a commonly used, readily understood modifier that subtracts the "gee whiz" elements of the genre, and adds in what for-lack-of-a-better-word we might call more "literary" qualities. It is a well-known, critically acclaimed, and reasonably ...


22

Yes...but... Yes, of course you can use your pen name. Your audiences need never hear anything different. None of your marketing materials need give your real name. The issue comes when you need to do things officially. Say, you get booked for a lecture and they set up transportation or a hotel for you. You need ID for those, so they'll need to be in ...


19

I think right now some publishers are looking for diversity, especially small presses. Li Ang Chang might get a little farther than Susan Brown, and probably quite a bit farther than Joe Brown. I also think you have a good point about being a positive representation of an Asian writer, particularly if you aren't writing about Asian culture. Make the point ...


19

My first published book was the eighth one I had written. I don't know that the other seven were stinkers--they earned me literary representation, and four of them climbed quite high on the ladder at publishers before ultimately being turned down--but for sure, I learned a lot and improved between books one and eight. I share this to say--not only is there ...


18

Your novel has a major supernatural element in it: people come back from the dead. No matter how you spin it, the central premise of your novel is supernatural. Correct me if I am wrong, but if you remove this element the story is not at all the same. This supernatural occurrence is a major plot device which the characters discuss in-world. Even if it's ...


17

Technically, you own all of the content you post on Facebook; therefore, you can copyright it. HOWEVER, by posting something on Facebook you: ...grant [Facebook] a non-exclusive, transferable, sub-licensable, royalty-free, worldwide license to use any IP content that you post on... Facebook. and while this license ends when you delete the content from ...


17

I've no idea how experienced you are or what your writing ideology is. I can tell my method and my view of my own work. Rather than read books on how other people do things - I simply wrote. The idea was that I needed to discover what type of writer I was, what I was good at etc. My stories are not my babies. There are many half-written novels which will ...


17

To be honest, I think what he says is fairly ignorant. He has a big audience already, mainly due to putting in a LOT of effort and dedication for years to grow his online image and brand. When you've already got an audience, you've already got quite a network of potential customers. Without an existing audience and without marketing (i.e. letting other ...


16

Probably Thinking of a Literary Agent The role you are describing is really that of a Literary Agent. Part of the question is, "Would a Literary Agent take on an unknown and begin representing her/him?" Great Resource For Leaning About Literary Agents Expectations That is where the Writer's Market (Writer's Digest Books) will come in very handy. It lists ...


15

Keep in mind, genre isn't an exact science, it's a marketing tool, and cross-genre books can actually do very well. Neuromancer is science-fiction noir. Star Wars is science-fiction fairy tale. Harry Potter is fantasy/mystery/teen-series. Books fall outside the lines all the time, that just gets glossed over in the marketing materials! What reader is ...


15

You need a website As a fiction author you should buy a web domain (URL) as close to your nom de plume as possible. Include contact info, and a professional bio. If you want a blog or some personal pages that's ok too, but primarily treat this webpage as a professional address, as if it's your booth at a writer's expo – a little more advertising and splash, ...


13

People adopt pen names for all sorts of reasons. George Orwell, Mark Twain, and John Cougar Melloncamp all had pen names for different reasons. Realistically, there's no one that can answer this for you. And as you point out, this is a business decision. As such, you should probably be in contact with your publisher, agent, or business manager as the case ...


13

My advice is to ignore the people that advocate writing a book in one month, or two, or three. Even with no other duties, it takes me at least six months to finish my fifth draft of a book, and I may spend another three months doing more drafts. I don't expect anybody else to follow my formula, it is based on my personal sensibilities and what I have found ...


12

I'm afraid I've never seen any statistics on this. As the comments have noted, this is a very difficult estimate to make - there are many different definitions of "getting published" (does self-publishing count? e-Publishing? Vanity? Short stories? Posthumously?), and it's practically impossible to track the many, many writers who never got past the ...


12

I feel like publishers would regard trilogies as a safer bet than a long-winded series. But then again, publishers regard works from well-known authors as a safer bet, too. To paraphrase Brandon Sanderson (as talking of his latest series, The Stormlight Archives), once you start getting fame (and some sales below your belt) you will have more leeway, since ...


11

I highly suggest you do nothing. A) is a very bad idea - it will tarnish your reputation as argumentative and rude. C) could easily be construed as doing A) -- even with the best intentions, someone could take it out of context -- so it's also best to avoid that. As for if my answer would change for a different type of novel, definitely no. This is good ...


11

The reference is to buying out of a publisher's exclusivity clause, in order to regain the rights required to republish your own work elsewhere. Writers often refer to "getting your rights back" for the time frame for this clause to expire (it's commonly a year from date of publication). There is sometimes (often?) a "penalty clause" that effectively ...


11

First of all, I think that that kind of serious constraint is mostly a stunt. It can be interesting, once. Usually an introduction or blurb for that sort of work explains the constraint, and why the author adopted it. Sometiems, particularly with a milder constrant, the reader is just left to figure it out. For example, "Uncleftish Beholding" (1989) by Poul ...


11

I think this is a total myth. Even if the book is well written: If no one knows, that it exists, no one will buy it. Promotion is the way to tell the people "Hey, here I have a good novel and it might be exactly what you want". Normally people don't go through several dozens of books, to find anything that suits them well. Just think about yourself. If ...


11

Author talking points and author background might give a reviewer or journalist something to write about. 1st-time fiction authors are – publicity wise – a dime-a-dozen. If there is a way to talk about the book and it's author, some "angle" that suggests the main character is unique and authentic because it comes from a unique and authentic experience, that'...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible