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25

Firstly, it's certainly not going to be a 'waste of time' to write the story you want to tell, regardless of which genre it might end up being described as. Fantasy is a very broad genre; any story recognizably set in a world other than our own can easily be described as fantasy if it doesn't focus strongly on themes that would suggest another (the effects ...


12

Low vs High Fantasy: A sliding definition Humans love to makeup labels and group things, but some [many? Most?] subjects don't actually play as nice as we might like the deeper we dive into them. When it comes to grouping and classifying in literature we have some rather awkward issues in drawing lines in the sand and settling on what goes where. If you ...


7

I believe low fantasy can encompass stories which have no magic. In some examples I've seen of low fantasy there is no magic but the setting in which it takes place is an entirely fictional world complete with fictional religious and belief systems. For example one of my favorite authors David Gemmell in his book Legend, the book takes place in an ...


6

There is also a genre called "Science Fantasy", also "Hard Fantasy" (borrowing from "Hard Science Fiction", which doesn't break any laws of physics) and of course just plain "Science Fiction". The genres with "Fantasy" in the name, even without magic, may have for example Dragons, not as magical creatures but just creatures. They may have other species ...


5

Fantasy isn't defined only by magic. I was a fan of fantasy literature for many years before coming across anyone trying to define "fantasy" as "stuff involving magic", which I've never really understood. For me, being set in an alternate world (including a fictional world-within-a-world like Harry Potter or Artemis Fowl) was always a bigger fantasy ...


5

Perhaps if you need a term, try "magical realism"? 98% like our world, but that little difference is what makes it fantasy... whether it's if subways will sometimes take you sideways to a different realm or unexpected country, or the Byzantine Empire stayed pagan, or if whenever Bob reads a book, all other copies of it are forever deleted, but he ...


4

Is it "permissable", for purposes of my novel, to create a second daughter? Yes, that is called historical fiction. Given the time, the daughter could be an illegitimate child of Grand Duke Vladimir; it was not unusual in the 1870-ish time frame for royalty to have affairs with multiple women, including servants of their own house or in the houses they ...


3

I don't know if it exists in your country, but as a graduate student in the USA, I once researched 3 years worth of newspaper headlines in four "national" papers (e.g. The New York Times), and I found those all in free online archives. My goal was different (looking for major news stories headlined in all four on the same day), but the idea is just to see if ...


2

So, you want to create a fictional order in a fictional settings that uses the name of the Templars as well as other historical organisations? So, kinda like the Templar Order in the Dragon Age video game? If nothing happened to Bioware for that decision (and nothing did), then you're safe. It's not like this is the first time a historical person or group ...


2

Nailing down the type of event you're looking for may help, just by defining what role you need it to play in the narrative. Do the characters need to be able to have a long conversation? Rock concert probably not an option, but a museum, art show, gallery or restaurant opening may be good. Larger cities also often have yearly events like film festivals that ...


1

It's just for fun. I copy/pasted a large chunk of my writing, and it told me I write like Arthur Clark. Then I copy/pasted a different large chunk from the same work (from the same scene actually), and it told me I write like Dan Brown. It uses a very simple machine learning algorithm (I guess you could say an AI, but that is a stretch) comparable to a ...


1

While clickbait are psychological tricks that are good but very well known nowadays, one option should be to take a strong position on one important topic that make people debate or disagree strongly. As a caricature I would give the example of any Tweet with Trump is this or that will trigger many reactions. Otherwise for me the way to do this in a ...


1

One might characterize most fiction in which people find true love or amazing success and live happily ever after as "fantasy" without the plot having "magic."


1

Your question seems to be a style issue. Personally I cannot recall ever using a scene break within a novel. More often than not the end of a scene is also the end of a chapter. Where the end of a scene is not the end of a chapter I simply insert a blank line between paragraphs. I use a blank line where the next scene involves a change in time or location. ...


1

Here is how I dealt with Lissien, the language in my dragon book. Pick a few root words and use them a lot. This gives readers an idea of what you mean, through repetition and similarity. Thus the dragons are Lissai, their language Lissien, an adolescent dragon is a glissond, an adult female an olissair, a clan leader is a hlissak, the king is hlissosak, ...


1

I am not a lawyer, but in general words are copyrighted; ideas are not. The context doesn't really matter too much, if the words are unique and convey the same idea for a different topic (which these almost definitely do), then you do not have the right to copy them! There is no excuse like "I was talking about horse breeding, and they were talking about ...


1

The only time I use exclamation points is in dialogue, thought, or in describing a thought process or feeling that is not put into worded thought by the character. My narrator (3rd person limited) never uses an exclamation point. I don't think of my narrators as a personality, they do not get themselves excited, confused, or have any emotions. My ...


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