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26

Different people get different things from a story If you think of the audience (or potential audience) for a story like a crowd of people sitting and watching as a tv show is being filmed, not every person in that audience is there for the same reason. Some people are a fan of the star actor, some people are there because their kid is into this sort of ...


17

God Syndrome: What does Superman from the 1950's look like today? No hero or villain can stop him. He's invincible. So what do you do if you're a bad guy, and have to deal with that? What happens when lily-white conservative Ultra-gal, who's 200 years old and doesn't look a day over 20, starts beating up ethnic minorities and the LGBTQ+ community for their '...


11

Check out the superhero franchise One Punch Man, so named because the main character could defeat all his opponents in one punch. He is clearly overpowered. But many people still found the series interesting, with the consensus on Rotten Tomatoes given as "With its state-of-the-art animation, unorthodox hero, and gut-bustlingly funny jabs at the shounen ...


7

I suspect your question will be closed as it leans to asking what to write (I'm not completely sure though, so no close vote from me yet), but I'll give you some of my ideas anyway. The GIF shows the reader not really comprehending what the book is saying (unless they are incredibly fast at reading), rather they are jumping across pages, perhaps to find a ...


6

As a huge Superman fanboy, I hear this alot, especially with Batman fans, but I always have my counter ready. In all stories (canon or else-world) the villains will always use Superman's greatest weakness against him. Few villains rarely go for this weakness intentionally, and even fewer are aware of it, but it's been part of Superman lore from the very ...


5

It's very rare that a movie does what you're describing, as I cannot think of a single movie doing what you describe. Each film uses the strengths of film to express internal dialogue, rather than explicitly saying what is said in the book. In all cases I can think of, the fourth wall is broken to an extent. High Fidelity (2000) did a fantastic job at this, ...


5

The media of cinema and literature are different enough that it's almost impossible to convert one into the other - hence the term "adaptation". Many of the strengths of one medium are weaknesses in the other. There's a good reason for the adage "Show, don't tell" when it comes to screenwriting; in addition, the script is one of many ...


3

Here are a couple of examples of possible problems a strong or magical person might face: There is a question: https://scifi.stackexchange.com/questions/131328/has-a-klingon-ever-been-head-butted-to-any-effect-by-a-non-klingon[1] One answer mentions a scene where a Klingon head butts Data and hurts his head on Data's super strong head. And my answer mentions ...


3

The big problem with the "Dead All Along" trope is that, if not handled well, it has the potential to lose audience investment. For example in your story you've established the main goal of the protagonist is to find the friend she was separated from as a child. This creates a desire in the audience to see them reunited, and that desire will grow ...


2

The reader doesn't know what the character's personality is like until the character does, says, feels, or thinks something. After the character does, says, feels, or thinks enough things, the reader may have a fairly complete idea of their character. But neighter the writer nor the reader will have a totally complete knowledge of the personality of the ...


2

Characters may change in some situations As already said, it depends a lot on the situation and what you want to go through. But a very important thing to be aware of is: the character is two people, the person he appears to be, and the person he really is. This applies to everyone. It is in moments like this, in moments of pressure, that the characters show ...


2

The comics have covered this a number of times over the past eighty years. The "simple" solution is to make the overpowered condition the protagonist's main problem. Superman can't have a girlfriend/wife (no matter how lonely he is, as the last living member of his people), because physical intimacy between a Kryptonian (with Superman's powers) ...


2

I would describe the action in the gif as riffling. Riffle - gerund or present participle: riffling turn over something, especially the pages of a book, quickly and casually. "he riffled through the pages" This implies a casual action, if you want a similar process but implied urgency then you could use the similarly spelled rifling Rifle - ...


2

There are many different ways in which an overpowered main character can be interesting. Just of the top of my head: He could struggle with his powers, not knowing how to use them, which purposes to use them for, face ethical dilemmas and questions of "I could, but should I?". His powers could be a burden as much as a gift, especially if he cannot ...


2

Generally speaking, it doesn't matter whether you use British English or American English in a story, so long as you keep it consistent: If you use "sceptical", you will need to ensure you use British English throughout ("colour", "car park", "realise", etc). If you use "skeptical", you will need to ensure ...


2

Because you're self-publishing, there is no "house" style. Let's take a look at your example, "skeptical vs sceptical" on GoogleNgram: You can see that the American version is much preferred. Most of the time, it is best to use American or British English rather than Canadian or Australian because they are the most popular. Other English ...


2

There are two sides of writing. First, is the glorious act of creation, thinking up plots, fleshing out characters, and building worlds. Then there is the mundane, blue-color work of making all of those dreams make some kind of sense (also known as revisions). I think that you are asking about the second and less glamorous part of the job. I will tell you ...


2

The Christopher Reeves Superman was, perhaps, the most powerful presentation of a super being in cinematic history. He effortlessly lifts a tectonic plate, for instance and brushes off nuclear weapons like so many water balloons. He has, in addition to his regularly recognized powers, the ability to turn invisible, to use high-level telekinesis, and to ...


1

Whilst it lies on a spectrum, I would say that there are two main types of story with an "overpowered" character, those in which their power solves the storys main problems and those in which it does not. In a story where a characters power does not solve their issues it is arguable if they even qualify as overpowered. In One Punch Man, there is no ...


1

Being Overpowered Is Just Another Character Trait Simply because their problems don't stem from being unable to overpower someone doesn't mean they stop encountering problems, only that their problems aren't the same as people for whom the ability to overpower their opposition is a limiting factor. Without knowing specifics, the stories you are reading may ...


1

Typically these superheroes fight their inner demons. Struggles of loyalty, character, loneliness. Depression. Perhaps also a deteriorating relation to the world they are supposed to help. Assume that a super-man has helped the government in good faith only to discover it was corrupt all the time and he was helping essentially the wrong side. Imagine they ...


1

The "Meritocratic" Power Fantasy These kind of stories are most popular in Korea, Japan and especially China where they play into the extremely competitive "meritocratic" education system where being successful through virtue, hard work, etc. makes the protagonist deserving of even more success. It is quite close to the American Dream in ...


1

There is one recurring theme of the "overpowered main character" (OMC) I've noticed. The OMC tends to be so foreign or alien to the people or world around them, that they don't understand how to apply their power to get the outcomes they desire. So the story ends up focusing less on "will OMC be strong enough to make this happen?" and ...


1

You can do it explicitly like you stated or .... Another method is to incorporate a unique setting and event in both. For instance, the Prologue happens on Bilbo's One Hundred and Eleventeenth birthday and in the first chapter they are planning Bilbo's One Hundred and Eleventeenth birthday party. The benefit of this method is it builds engagement bevause ...


1

Taking advantage of film as a medium shouldn’t be at the cost of staying true to the source material but that says nothing about handling voice-over. Don’t you think it would be a very rare film that narrated any of the given example, action or thought of either kind? After Jill is shown arriving early and visiting the flats, why would she not then step in a ...


1

I think the standard trick is to invent a character and a reason for her to tell this stuff to. Say you add a guy selling tacos: Taco guy: Two fish tacos, extra cilantro? [Jill nods yes, glad to see him] Taco guy: You're going to miss these after you move Jill [dumping on condiments]: Yeah, but I won't miss the stench of the ocean Taco guy: I've been saying ...


1

I know this question was asked 2 years ago but on the off chance anyone is reading this... Have Eris feel immense guilt and sorrow and just general intense emotion with regards their killing. Have it haunt her, have her only kill out of blind panic and then feel instant remorse, or have her exhaust every other option before killing a person. And give her a ...


1

Suffering is Drama (and transformation): Unfortunately, I think this might fall into the "Asking what to write" category of questions. Answering "what should I do?" isn't something we can say. So I'll try to address this in a general way, keeping away from specifics. If you are asking more generally about how humans behave in high-stress ...


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