83

What is "the right way"? Why do you consider it better than some other way to write a story? What do you consider "mistakes"? You can ask your son about why he has made certain stylistic choices or plot choices, but at the end of the day, those are his choices to make. You can criticise aspects of the story that you feel are unoriginal, or have unfortunate ...


79

You don't have to do anything special at all. First you will seek an agent, with a query letter. Look up on the Internet or in writing books on Amazon how to write a query letter. Do not mention your age. If you get a response of somebody willing to read a sample, send it. Before you sign any contract or agreement, you will need to tell the other party you ...


33

There are no age restrictions on publishing - you may need to get someone else to sign contracts for you, but that's a minor detail. That said, it's pretty hard to get a book published, even for adults who've been working at writing for a long time. It's probably best if you focus on writing because it's fun, and give yourself a chance to explore without ...


24

Assuming this isn't a school assignment, subject to a grade, I think your most effective approach right now is just to encourage him in his writing rather than trying to improve it. This is a good time and age to explore his creativity. When he becomes older and starts to have ambitions for his work, he will become more open to suggestions for making it ...


12

Don't discount yourself because you're young. That's great that you're starting off so early. Keep at it! Though I don't believe anyone will have a problem with it, there are different scenarios depending on how you want to be published (self-pub vs traditional pub). For traditional, no one is going to ask your age when you're submitting queries, so if ...


9

Writing 'soppy prose' is an entirely separate issue from writing accurately about intoxication. If your examiners are primarily interested in your writing skills and language use you should focus on the soppiness rather than the accuracy. I don't know what marking schema they work to in your area but it would be incredibly harsh if they were to mark down ...


9

Try giving him some books to read about the subject he wrote about. You will soon find out if he is really interested in the stories or if it was just something he used to try and get your attention. Reading about how other authors handle these stories might give him some learning experience. And maybe when he tries to write again he will keep this other ...


8

Your readers won't care about your age Sometimes an author will write a little autobiographic blurb that is printed at the end of the book. If you do this and you mention your age in there your readers might realize how old you were when you wrote your book. At least those readers that care about the author biography. Your readers will care about the ...


7

No, there is no limit, other than how fast she can type. To get published, she would need a parent or guardian to sign publishing contracts on her behalf.


6

Authors have to write about things they haven't experienced all the time. Just look at crime authors writing for TV or Movies: They must show characters being raped, murdered, burned alive, mugged and shot. They must show characters committing those crimes against others. They must show children being kidnapped and forced into child sex and porn rings, they ...


6

Remember that researching an issue or experience you don't have experience with doesn't just mean "reading up" on it. A time-honoured research approach is to find people with the experience you're lacking, and interview them. Is there a family member who might have experience with alcohol or marijuana (two of the most common intoxicants)? Or, if not, is ...


6

One of the other answers might have been a bit harsh and would lead more established writers to mutter sarcastically "wish I'd thought of that", but there's something useful in it - it sounds like you're thinking ahead to publication before the book is finished. While you'll want to consider your intended audience during writing and editing, an important ...


6

Though he looks forward to my praise, which I surely do, he gets bored every time I try to outline his flaws in the story. That's pretty standard 11-year-old-boy behavior. I peeked at their handbook recently and there's a whole section on how to keep your parents from bugging you about stuff you don't want to do. I bet you'd get the same bored look if you ...


6

Amazon allows your parent to publish your book for you 4.1 Eligibility. You must have an active Program account in order to participate in the Program. You represent that you are at least 18 years old (or the age of majority where you reside, whichever is older) and that you are able to form a legally binding contract. A parent or guardian of a ...


6

Adapted from my answer to Can I self-publish a book on the Kindle store when I'm under 18? Absolutely, whenever you publish something with multiple authors—whether it's a collaboration or a work where a primary author(s) uses someone else's material—you want a written contract. My suggestion in your case is that one of you (probably you) is the primary ...


6

You say that in your head there are pauses in the dialogue, but in the text they just aren't there. Well then, insert the pauses. ‘How terrifying!’ said Frodo. There was another long silence. The sound of Sam Gamgee cutting the lawn came in from the garden. ‘How long have you known this?’ asked Frodo at length. ‘And how much did Bilbo know?’ J.R.R. ...


5

Well, it may seem obvious, but you need research. From your point of view it may seem really difficult, since you didn't have any experience of schools after first grade, but don't worry. Most of us writers don't have direct experience with dragons, wars, swordfights, eldritch horrors, torture, espionage, terrorism, distopian dictatorships, and so on. ...


5

This is a classic problem for writers. I once heard a lecture by Isaac Asimov, a well-known science fiction writer, where he said that his first attempt at writing fiction was set in a small town, and people told him that was a bad idea because he had, at that point in his life, never been outside New York City. But, he said, he went on to write stories set ...


5

Read something you wrote a year or more ago. It is entirely possible that the reason your recently written dialog is racing by so fast is that you are very familiar with its content. When your eyes touch the first few words of a sentence, you already know how the sentence will end, so you skip the tedious reading time and just dump the content from ...


4

Yes, you can. There are absolutely no age restrictions when writing a book. A very famous author named Gordon Korman published his first book when he was 12. I also believe that if you are younger you have a better imagination. But make sure to tell your parents you are very serious about it because they will have to sign contracts. Another bad thing is that ...


4

I thought I would throw my two cents into the mix. I wrote my first book(non-fiction) when I was about 16-17 (I am 20 now.) and decided to self-publish it with the help of a few friends and family members. Short answer: Yes. You can publish your book. Long answer: Take your first book as the biggest experience of your writing career. It's unlikely that ...


4

Leave the corrections to his teachers, that's what they're for. The best you can do as his parent is encourage creative habits. Talking from personal experience; around his age I wrote my first short story. It was horrible: no plot, plenty of spelling and grammatical errors, etc. But it ignited my love for writing. I honestly believe it was because ...


3

It depends what kind of publishing we are talking about. I think it's actually better to pursue traditional publishing at a young age, provided you understand you are probably in for a long road of rejection and revision. There is a big push for exclusivity in publishing and that will certainly include new voices for new generations. So I think pursuing ...


3

Proof-read and ask for constructive criticism. Your age won't matter to the readers, the content does however the content is still subjective to the experience (or lack thereof) associated with one's age. You should ensure your story contains sufficient amount of details to be compelling while not wandering over to the land of toxic complexity and length. ...


3

If the novel is good enough to get published, it won't matter how old you are. You'll just be that much cooler. I've been trying to get published since 12, like you—well actually 11—and I'm 17 now, still sans dice, as they say. I hope you have more luck. Don't ever give up. And maybe brush up on your homonyms ("too" vs "to"—though that's minutiae).


3

Yes, you can write a book even though you're young. No, there is no guarantee that it will become widely read, or that it will sell a lot of copies. There are two ways to learn something: 1) Learn from someone who has done it before (and achieved the result you want to have). Usually you end of with similar results to your mentor. 2) Do it (...


3

I think whether or not you can get the book “published” is irrelevant. I recommend you don’t even concern yourself with that. In the first place, you can publish it yourself, on your own website, or through iBookstore or Amazon. But perhaps even more important, the process of writing the book and expressing yourself and growing as a writer is the key thing. ...


3

Quick answer: Nancy Yi Fan started writing her first book at age seven. At 10, she got it published. It was called, "Sword Bird". I never read it myself, but it got good reviews and was fairly popular. Now she has two more Sword Books published. Three books published before you're twenty is a pretty sweet accomplishment. Yes it's quite possible.


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