19

I don't think this is the right way to go about it. I have to say I'm not a fan of explanatory footnotes in fiction, it's far too much of an immersion breaker. In fact I'd go so far as to say they are flat-out awful and should be avoided wherever possible. It's a mental load having to go down to the foot of the page, read something that necessarily breaks ...


11

You don’t say what age of children you want to address and I’m not sure whether your use of the young-adult tag indicates older children or if that is intended to cover your ’adult’ audience. If you are talking about children who have a minimum 4-5 years of schooling, I’d suggest considering a glossary as a section either at the front of the back of the ...


10

I feel like advice that was given to me about writing characters of the opposite gender also applies here. Just write it as if it were a regular kiss with individuals of separate genders. Of course you may need to make exceptions for anatomy, but I think what would be more important in this is the build up to the scene, rather than the scene itself. ...


9

If you're writing for an American audience, with an American publisher, then use an American dialect for your narration. But... your character is living in England. Whether she's British or an immigrant or a visitor, she's going to be exposed to the local dialect. She will use local terms when appropriate. If she's in Year 8 in school, she'll say that. ...


8

You haven't really provided enough details to make definitive calls for these, and to be honest you'd probably struggle to do that in the context of an SE question anyway. What I can do is give you some guidance on how you might be able to work out the classifications for yourself and see what we can do: Reader Age: As a rough guide you're talking 8-12 for ...


6

You say that in your head there are pauses in the dialogue, but in the text they just aren't there. Well then, insert the pauses. ‘How terrifying!’ said Frodo. There was another long silence. The sound of Sam Gamgee cutting the lawn came in from the garden. ‘How long have you known this?’ asked Frodo at length. ‘And how much did Bilbo know?’ J.R.R. ...


5

Read something you wrote a year or more ago. It is entirely possible that the reason your recently written dialog is racing by so fast is that you are very familiar with its content. When your eyes touch the first few words of a sentence, you already know how the sentence will end, so you skip the tedious reading time and just dump the content from ...


4

Should I story board/outline the novel and hand it over to a ghost writer directly to write from scratch? Or should I write a "bad" first draft and hire an editor to rewrite it, ideally in a more compelling manner. That rumble in the distance is the sound of a thousand plotters and pantsers, marching towards this thread to wage war on each other. ...


4

A kiss is just a kiss. It's not a gay kiss as far as writing is concerned. Lips are lips. Maybe they both have beards or something but...the same feelings and actions you would have in a hetero kiss, you would have in what you are calling a gay kiss. The real issue is this: Now if I write it I might be afraid people won't approve it. Thing is, there ...


3

Thinking about it. This bit expands on Chris Sunami's suggestion, one way to extend the dialogue is to describe the thoughts and feelings of the POV character as the dialogue progresses, or as the scene progresses. We are presumably following some character, or several characters, that are not wooden posts, and care about and think about what is being ...


3

This has been an issue for me as well. As the writer, you bring a wealth of context to each word that isn't present for the reader, unless you put it on the page. If all you're writing is dialogue, you'll end up with a script, not a book --something that will be incomplete unless some actor puts in the work to bring it to life. With that said, the answer isn'...


3

Grab a friend or family member and print out the scene so you each have it on paper. Ask the other person to read it out loud, acting it out to some degree. Was there a pause in your head that your reader just missed? Circle it on your copy. Have your partner take one character while you take the other (add people or double up on characters if you need ...


3

When I was a kid, I had the Walking With Dinosaurs and Walking With Beasts companion books, and I read them over and over. I didn't know a lot of the more technical terms, but I could either look them up in the dictionary, or just guess what they meant based on context. It didn't affect my enjoyment of, or engrossment in, the stories in the slightest. I ...


3

My advice? Take the plunge, and do the best that you can. Don't assume that because you're used to writing scripts that you can't layer in the description. Just picture in your head the scene and describe it. Then, higher a developmental or someone else to help fix it. Don't send it to a ghost writer. I've written with quite a bit of economy of description, ...


2

Writing for the screen is not the same as writing a novel. However, there are many similarities. For example, you have to be prepared actually write rather than just talk about it, you have to edit what you have written, dialogue has to sound realistic, characters have to be three-dimensional, there has to be conflict, etc. If I was you, I would start with ...


2

Whenever I see a book cover that's anime looking I'll think that's it's a manga/graphic novel or a light novel. But if you want to cater to the general young adult audience I think you should try using a more traditional approach for you book cover.


1

It sounds like you are in draft mode either pick the most compelling one that moves the plot along in a way you prefer most or rewrite it until there is no other options left for them to go and one way or bust is the solution. If you are in draft and your mind really wants to chase rabbit holes on these what if scenarios then pick one and go down as far ...


1

Consider this article. To paraphrase, according to this article middle-grade books should have no profanity, typically have protagonists aged 10-13, have no sexual content and no graphic violence, and tend to have shallow plots. Young Adult novels meanwhile can have profanity and tend to have older, teenaged protagonists, and often grapple with more ...


1

If you need footnotes, you're not doing it right. It never hurts to be redundant, especially in children's books. E.g. Johnny was a roughneck. He did whatever jobs the driller asked him to do. But Bill was only a roustabout. He had to do whatever work anyone asked of him. Having a glossary provides even more redundancy, and makes it easy to look up ...


1

By far the most successful young-adult novels in history, Harry Potter, use British spellings, terminology, idioms, and slang—and they did nothing to stop those novels from being more successful than any other. References to prefects and so on, slang like “snogging” etc., caused no problems. For that matter, few Americans had ever even heard the name “...


1

Use English English except where doing so would cause confusion, in which case use neutral words. If you can't do that, maybe clarify with extra information, (e.g. for "Year 8", you could also add in the age of the character, which makes it clear what grade that year represents) or if you absolutely have to, a footnote or have the narrator explain or ...


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