12

Writing SE often gets a lot of questions in this vein: "Should I include [thing] in my story, since so many other books in my genre have it?" "I don't feel super comfortable writing [thing] but I feel obligated to write it, should I?" "Will readers expect [thing] in my story and be disappointed if it's not there?" The answer ...


6

Instead of looking at this as an arbitrary hoop to jump through, consider the reasons behind it. Publishers are looking for books with LBGTQ+ characters because book buyers are seeking those out. Why? Either because they are LBGTQ+ themselves and would like to see their own experience reflected, or because they want fictional worlds that better reflect the ...


6

So far, no LGBT character has 'organically' come up in the story. Speaking as someone who is Bi and in a homosexual relationship, The above quote from you is all I care about. If, in the creative process, you come up with a cool character who fits your story and is fun to read... and happens to be gay... then by all means write about the character. If you'...


4

Should I story board/outline the novel and hand it over to a ghost writer directly to write from scratch? Or should I write a "bad" first draft and hire an editor to rewrite it, ideally in a more compelling manner. That rumble in the distance is the sound of a thousand plotters and pantsers, marching towards this thread to wage war on each other. ...


3

Don't worry about your lack of experience in that area You're saying that this is a YA book, so presumably, your characters are not really all that old. Which - on the one hand - means that your lack of experience and awkwardness might actually be a lot more fitting than you might imagine, but also that it is very unlikely that your book will become more ...


3

My advice? Take the plunge, and do the best that you can. Don't assume that because you're used to writing scripts that you can't layer in the description. Just picture in your head the scene and describe it. Then, higher a developmental or someone else to help fix it. Don't send it to a ghost writer. I've written with quite a bit of economy of description, ...


3

"Young Adult" is not a genre, but a fiction category for the target age of the readers (which may not be the age of your characters). A genre you may consider may be 'Historical Fiction'. This is when a fictional story is set in a real historic setting. Historical accuracy is important in this genre. Some YA Historical Fiction book examples would ...


2

Writing for the screen is not the same as writing a novel. However, there are many similarities. For example, you have to be prepared actually write rather than just talk about it, you have to edit what you have written, dialogue has to sound realistic, characters have to be three-dimensional, there has to be conflict, etc. If I was you, I would start with ...


2

My advice purely as a reader, unless you plan on exploring a love triangle in an in-depth, nuanced and mature way (not from a superficial "Becky the high school popular girl has feelings for Brett but Brett's dating Brenda" perspective), then no. Do not explore a love triangle. They are hackneyed, melodramatic, overused, and nearly always poorly ...


2

My advice: explore ways that this subplot could contribute to the existing, main, central plot of the storyline. If this love-triangle subplot will strengthen the main plot, add it in! But don't add it just for "extra plot". It will distract and make the whole story weaker. Specifically, consider how this subplot will affect your protagonist's ...


2

It depends. I think that first, you need to decide your audience. You said you were writing a YA novel, and profanity is one of the things that makes YA. Even if your characters are older, if it’s kid-friendly it’s technically not YA. I’m writing a series where my characters are older teens, but my audience is still middle school age and it wouldn’t be YA. ...


1

As far as I know, there is no legal requirement to include LGBT characters in YA novels in the USA. And in a few countries there might be official censorship decreeing that no LGBT characters appear in YA novels. Anyway, stories vary greatly in how many characters they have and how much information about various characters is given. A story could involve a ...


1

I think you should try to consider all of your options. You're trying to provide extra layers to make the plot more interesting, and romance is a way to do that (though you shouldn't feel obligated to have one just because of the genre) But it isn't the only way. You could avoid the issue of romantic inexperience if you instead chose to spice up your story ...


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