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It may add an amusing undercurrent if the friend was actually not a jealous idiot, and only the primary protagonist knows this - the jealousy is a public front used in an attempt to determine who the protagonist's friends really are. His acts of evil in "helping" the bad guys always fail in such a way as the blame points to one of the evildoer's ...


1

Let your characters write the story for you. What is your MC's weakness? What could happen in your world that would force them to face that weakness head-on? What decisions would your MC make at key points? Were the decisions difficult to make? Keep a loose vision of where your story must go, but let your characters breathe and the plot between those points ...


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Given I've written about a quarter of my story so far, which defines my characters and world and sets them up for their journey, what is the best way to proceed? Ask your characters what happens next. You know where your foreground characters are. You know them well enough to know how they'd react to certain situations. So: set up the characters who haven't ...


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I have been having the same problem, so the amount of help I can give is limited. I will say this, on a more constructive note. Originality means little, writing is 99% execution and 1% original thought. As some might sarcastically say, "copying from one source is plagiarism, copying from a whole bunch is inspiration". As an example, take a look at ...


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Sciborg's excellent answer tells the truth plain and simple. I'd like to add a few psychological tricks to make the process hurt a little less. If you are a parent to a young child or know someone who is, you might have noticed young children can and will rewatch the same episode of the same show over and over again. Why? Because their brains are still ...


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As somebody who has lots of story ideas but really struggles to get them written to completion, I can personally relate to this, and I would love to offer some advice that helped me to get through this problem. Hopefully it will help you too! What happened to me Over the past few months, I've been writing a cyberpunk detective story. It's a new genre venture ...


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At the center of every story that really is a story, there is a character who changes. If none of your characters change, you have no story, just a sequence of related events. (For an example, compare the two films Cars and Cars 2. Two characters change in the first movie. Nobody changes in the second, and so the second film is forgettable.) Look over these ...


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In my opinion, you've already done a lot of the hard work. Creating the characters and well-constructed world-building leaves you open to follow endless avenues of plot. This is why fan-fiction is so popular because once you have the characters and the world, the plot can start writing itself. That said, as @JonStonecash has said, finishing the first draft ...


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First of all, there are only so many plots. It is unlikely that you will come up with a new heretofore unseen plot. It is not the newness of the plot but the telling of the tale that is important. Second, I think that your priorities are askew. Your first priority should be to finish your first draft. Then, and only then, should you worry about the issues ...


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Not all advice is equally helpful to all writers. Some pieces of advice aren't even equally helpful to the same writer during different stages of the writing process. Like using a satnav, always exercise judgment before blindly yanking the wheel and driving into the nearest lake because a disembodied voice told you to. That said, I think both bullet points ...


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If someone else did it well, I shouldn't write it This statement is very easily disproven - by looking at pretty much any mainstream genre. For example, the fantasy genre contains many different good books - LOTR, Mistborn, etc. Some people might begin writing a fantasy novel and then say "Tolkien and Sanderson did it well - what's the point?" I ...


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