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According to this article and other sources, there are four defined stages of culture shock that you could have your character experience. You could write them in any order, but this is typically the order in which they occur in the real world. 1: The Honeymoon Stage The character falls in love with the culture. She becomes infatuated with the language, ...


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I’m a Korean person and I think I might be able to help answer the second question, regarding the name of the love interest. One thing that really stands out to me is that Koreans tend to have a somewhat negative feeling towards the Japanese, ever since the Japanese took over our country for a bit. We also are pretty bitter about the fact that they are ...


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I'm not Korean; I'm a white minority culture inside wider white society in North America. This makes me conscious of cultural differences and sensitivity about these differences. Not that I can speak with regards to the Korean language or religion at all. However, in my culture we speak a different language and have a different religion, both of which draw ...


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This is done all the time, especially for fantasy worlds but also for other books. It also depends on what you mean by using a real world. If you mean setting a story in a particular city, that's done all the time as well. Laurell K. Hamilton's books are set in New Orleans (as so many are). There should be no legal consequences so long as you're not being ...


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This type of borrowing is done all the time. In regular fiction, the setting is still a "real" world, only it is borrowed from some some other place (or places) on Earth, with necessary renaming. In fantasy, the fictionalized world is often borrowed from some real historic setting, like medieval England, sometimes with a great level of detail. ...


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Western movies and television shows are set in the wild west of imagination, which is more or less based on the real western half or two thirds of the USA usually between about 1850 and 1900. So westerns are based on a real time and a real vast region, and thus might be supposed to happen in that real time and real region. But many westerns change so many ...


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People habitually base worlds on real-life setting, whether historical or contemporary. Legal consequences are something that arise when an individual person or business could be deduced despite the change of the name. (If someone can work out from details that your "Scarlet Fowl" is really the "Red Hen" restaurant, you had best be ...


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