72

I can type at about 5K words per hour, but I can't write nearly that fast. I need to think of what's going on. I need to keep some sort of consistency, and I can't remember all the details. I need to do some planning. My creativity seems to burn out somewhere around 5K words each day. Putting words on the computer screen is one thing; knowing which ...


28

In theory this could be possible, but such an author would burn themselves out after a couple of days with such an intense schedule. A novel is more than just 100,000 words thrown together. There needs to be a story and characters. You need to engage the audience, ensure there are no accidental contradictions. This requires planning and revisions and this is ...


25

You are under the misguided assumption that writing is just the act of putting words on paper. The verb itself certainly has that meaning, but when applied to the writing of books, there is also conceptualizing, planning, outlining. Many works of fiction have at least the same number of words in notes and ideas. And then there is the word that I'll only ...


23

Just do the math. Although it varies by genre, from about 80,000 to 120,000 (epic fantasy with lots of world-building), 1000 a day means 80 to 120 days. So about three or four months for a first draft. About the time I take myself. Personally, I set aside 90 minutes every morning (my best time to write) to write, and use Orson Scott Card's advice: You don't ...


17

this seems to mean that they wouldn't have to spend too much time on revision or editing other than correcting a few minor mistakes here and there You seem to consider revision as error fixing, but fixing the story is another major part of revising. This is unrelated to how someone created the text (dictation, typing, ...) and involves a lot of cut/pasting ...


10

A standard manuscript page has about 250 words on average. Standard manuscript format is this (or a minor variation): 8.5" x 11" 1" margins top and bottom, left and right. 12 point Courier font. Double spaced. If you have significantly more or fewer than that on average, your document is likely not formatted in the standard manuscript form. Here are a few ...


10

There's no hard and fast rule for when to end or start a new chapter. Like word choice or sentence length, it's a matter of feel, of craftsmanship. Still, there ought to be a good reason for beginning and ending a chapter. Given this, being aware of some of the reasons why you might end/start a chapter is helpful. Among the more common reasons for ...


10

There is no single answer that can be given for this, since books can be typeset in a variety of different ways, and different font faces and sizes will produce a varying number of words per page. However, a generally accepted formatting for manuscripts is double-spaced, 12-point Times New Roman, with one-inch page margins. Based on that, it's assumed that ...


9

I think I read this in the Sell Your Novel Toolkit, but I may have seen it elsewhere: Retail stores have limited space. Debut authors (except for a very limited few) have very limited shelf space. You might get 3 books on a shelf (300k words of paper). But you're only selling 2 books with 150k words, not 3. So all of a sudden the risk just went up for the ...


9

As other answers have explained, it takes time to devise engaging characters, plots, backgrounds, worlds, &c.  But some genres and styles need more of that than others; and it probably depends upon the length and quality level you're aiming for. The world record for the number of novels written in one year is 23, held by romantic novelist Barbara ...


9

Very short and incredibly rough estimate: 10.000 words are around 1 hour play time. After some research I've found that the answer is... even more difficult than I had first imagined... First of all some statistics that I have found about the visual novel Fate/Stay Night, one of the longest visual novels and one of the more widely known ones in the ...


8

What are the sources for these numbers[?] These are "best guess" averages by people familiar with the industry. These numbers are based on rough estimates of what a variety of publishers typically seem to want. [A]re there more I am not aware of[?] Likely. These estimates tend to break down into two dovetailing categories - basic word counts and ...


7

55K words is a novella; your teacher is wrong there. 80K to 85K is a good book length. If your story will require two books (or however many), finish them all before shopping the first one to an agent. Explain in the cover letter that it's a completed series. Agents may balk at an open-ended cliffhanger from a novice, but if you say that the two/three/etc. ...


7

Although it is unclear from your question I'm going to assume you've surpassed 1000 words and are looking to reduce your word count. Unlike other forms of writing, they key good fiction writing is 'voice'. If you read a good story you can 'hear' the narrator. In contrast if you read newspaper article or cookery book there's no voice - just clear and succinct ...


7

In a group context such as this I think emulating the behavior of the group is best. Use similar word counts. Detail similar aspects. If the people of the group don't typically describe certain features or characteristics then omit those. Once you get a feel for the group dynamic then you can start to bend the rules. Start small and work from there. Don't ...


7

There are many factors that would affect whether 1000 words a day is realistic for you or not. E.g.: Do you do overtime? How long is your commute to/from work? Can you use the commute time for writing? What else do you have to do other than working? Do you have a spouse? Children? Must you do the grocery shopping, the cooking, the cleaning? How long does ...


6

I just popped into my office and pulled a few books off the shelf. It's easy to estimate: Count up the total number of words on 10 random (full) lines from different places and divide by 10 to get the average words-per-line. Count the number of lines on each page to get the lines-per-page. Check that the book actually starts on page 1 - sometimes the stuff ...


6

Different versions of Word count words slightly differently. For files that are just text, this isn't generally a problem, it's things like text in graphics and footnotes that throw this off. There's more information in this related question on SuperUser: What is MS Word counting or ignoring when it counts words in an open vs. closed file? It's worth noting ...


6

Everything else aside, if the writing style you use is going to make the piece exceed the maximum length, then I would change your writing style. The writing style you used to compose this question is succinct but also conveys all necessary information and flows well. It's a remarkably different style from the example that you quoted. I suspect that when ...


6

I don't think it is too long, I write chapters nearly that long. Some readers (even my own) complain that they use chapters to gauge their progress through the story and as stopping points, and very long chapters mess them up on that. You don't have to break yours up, but in response to that I have broken a chapter somewhere in the 40% to 60% area, by ...


6

I put a paragraph break in your question as an edit, but it's still a huge block of text (now two huge blocks). Chapter dividers are a grander version of that. They give your reader a chance to catch her/his breath. Don't make it hard for them to take a break. A lot of people like to stop at the end of a chapter. Some books don't have any chapters at ...


6

It is not that simple. Do you want a very rough draft or a finished novel? And it will depend on your experience and your process. So what is your writing background and knowledge of methods to do a novel? Writing will not be able to be predicted in exact amounts as 'X' words/week. It is much harder to write all day than for an hour or two at a time. And ...


5

There's no standard number of "saids per page." Use it when you need to let the user know who's talking. Not on every quote, but whenever clarity is needed. (Less often when two people are speaking, more often when more than two are speaking.) Have your readers mark the spots where they get confused about who's saying what. Don't be shy with them. Readers ...


5

The answer to this question is simple: there is no minimum recommended length. Write the best damn story you can possibly write, regardless of length. Put every ounce of blood, sweat and tears into it. Forget to eat, lose sleep, neglect your family — truly immerse yourself into the book. Then you edit, re-edit and maybe edit some more until you are left ...


5

Instead of focusing on whether you should lengthen the story, try to work out whether that will happen naturally as a result of whatever improvements your redraft mandates. For example: Are there characters or plot points that, if you're being honest, aren't nearly developed enough in the first draft? Is there a structural or format change that, although it ...


5

I've been mulling this too. Short stories serve a different purpose, like a poem is different than a novel. One idea is that a short story is: A Character, In A Situation, With A Problem ... This idea is to structure the story differently than a novel. The story could be simply the resolution of a relationship between a dying man and his estranged wife. ...


5

You need to be very sparse when writing short stories. Whereas a novel needs to answer every* reasonable* question or a reader gets frustrated, a short story needs to leave a lot more up to the reader's imagination. Not only that, you need to pick a small enough objective that you can achieve it in the word count. This is true of every story you'll ever ...


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