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How to describe someone whose eyes sparkle mischievously?

Show it elsewhere: There's nothing wrong, in my opinion, with having some tell in your show. It is, in fact, very difficult to eliminate all together. To carry off the show with less tell, you'd need ...
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3 votes

How to describe someone whose eyes sparkle mischievously?

Eyes that sparkle with humor, mischief, or ja ne se qua are already ‘showing.’ The phrase is so well-worn that it is not recognized as a deeply internalized observation of one person’s attraction ...
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2 votes

Is there a word for something that is structured like a parody, but utilizes an idealized or improved version of the original context?

There is a word for a sort of parody which doesn't mock the work but borrows its style, namely pastiche. According to the Wikipedia, "[u]nlike parody, pastiche celebrates the work it imitates, ...
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3 votes

Is there a word for something that is structured like a parody, but utilizes an idealized or improved version of the original context?

I think you were right with Utopian. The real world political problems that would come with much of the West Wing stories was just left out, or glossed over. We've had charismatic leaders that could ...
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10 votes
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Is there a word for something that is structured like a parody, but utilizes an idealized or improved version of the original context?

I would argue that a parody is not always a negative imitation of something, nor is it always intended to mock. What it is is something that imitates another thing in order to comment on it. For ...
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1 vote

How do you describe the sound of a body being dragged through the snow?

How is it being dragged? The other question is, what kind of snow? From Minnesota and Wisconsin, I've dragged plenty of stuff through snow - including bodies (okay, DEER bodies). The most distinctive ...
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4 votes

Can "splooge" be considered a form of onomatopoeia?

It's not necessarily onomatopoeic. If whatever is being talked about using splooge (as any part of speech) made a noise that sounded like "splooge" (or could be described that way, whatever ...
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