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1

One of those people: Such condescending expressions have gone out of favor in more recent history, so finding anything modern will be difficult. A lot depends on who is saying it, and to whom. It could be racist, political, or class-conscious, all of which would require different answers. I also don't know what limits you might have trying to provide a ...


0

I don't know if this fits the tone of your writing, or your characters. It's more P.G. Wodehouse, and it does happen to fit my style. I love inverting cliches, e.g. Churchill referring to a Parliamentary opponent as a "sheep in sheep's clothing." So: "casting swine before Pearl" (in fact, I would name a minor character "Pearl" ...


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I suggest the phrase casting swine before pearls where the word pearls is used ironically.


3

The style guide for Transcribe.com recommends putting "[phonetic]" next to names the transcriber doesn't know how to spell. I think that would work here too (paralleling "[sic]"). You may be able to get a better spelling, however: Get help from someone familiar with the name's language of origin if it's not your own. A native (or even ...


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One way of conveying the sound of a word in print is to use the International Phonetic Alphabet (IPA). It is an internationally recognised system which matches a character to a sound. The characters are conventionally set between two forward slashes: / /. Where in Standard English, we use a single letter 'a' for a number of sounds, the IPA gives the option ...


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