New answers tagged

0

Undoubtedly, no structures are banned, so to speak, from the English lanuage. It is all a matter of convenience and desired outcome. Sure, as a general rule, to quote @Zan700 from the comments, one tends to avoid repeating words with similar roots within a paragraph, let alone one sentence. This is to avoid sounding monotonous, of course, and unintelligible -...


5

I don't think this would be a problem, personally. If you do find that your beta readers are struggling to pronounce "Thibodaux", or a publisher advises that the name may be an issue, a simple solution would be to include a sequence in the book where another character pronounces it wrong and Thibodaux corrects them. As an example, Harry Potter and ...


1

That usually relies on the writer's style and skill… Look how Iris Murdoch introduces great and irrelevant details of menus and cooking, when it wasn't in any way necessary even to mention that anyone was eating. Notice when Robert A Heinlein lists every move in a game of mental chess which has no real effect on the story or - more than once - describes ...


0

Pick your idea first. What is it? And how do you want to approach it? All styles are fine as long as the target audience is satisfied. You don't want to bore airport novel readers with a lot of detail, and you don't want to ruffle feathers by writing an outline for a research paper. Indiana Jones was an entertaining swashbuckler flick - to develop its ...


Top 50 recent answers are included