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23

I am going to agree with Surtsey here. I do not think single word titles are the prevalent. I still think I can answer the question of what are the benefits of using a single word title. I am also going to focus on "Climb" and not "Superhot", as I think the second is just 2 words. Titles of things are there for the first time impact. You want to hear the ...


13

As with others, I think your assertion is incorrect. Based on an analysis of the 342 film title given in this list of film releases in 2019, I find that 26% of films have 1 word titles, 32% have 2 word titles, 19% have 3 word titles, 13% have 4 word titles, and the remaining 10% have 5 or more. The longest was 9 words. This shows a strong preference for ...


10

I think your assertion is incorrect. My collection of movies surpasses 400. More titles begin with the word 'the' than are a single world in their entirety. Single word titles promote the noun (part of our celebrity obsession): Superman, Batman, Alien. This encourages franchise and series. Single titles tend to be about noun - verb - noun, how one thing ...


10

The reason, as you guessed, is marketing. One word that sums up something memorable about a movie is a mental handle, it can appear in far larger type on a billboard, it eats up only 1 second in a 15 second commercial, it is very easy for people to recognize and associate a single word; psychologically that happens faster. If I say "Avatar" you know exactly ...


8

The following is a VERY naive piece of research. I've downloaded the IMDB titles dataset (available here: https://datasets.imdbws.com/title.basics.tsv.gz), and took the 3rd column - primaryTitle. I then created a histogram of the number of titles containing each count of words. One very probable problem is I'm not taking language into consideration; ...


5

Because sometimes expressive isn't what the intent is. Sometimes a creator wants something succinct and punchy, while actually still giving enough away about the setting or premise to be intriguing. Longer titles contrary to your belief are popular, but are not necessarily any more clear, even if they are more expressive. You also have to remember that the ...


2

Inspired by @Ran Locar's answer, I had a look at all films that came out by year and the (naive) word count of each title. The dataset I used was this Kaggle set, so if the original question specifically thinks this trend changed in the past two years then this won't help. However, it looks to me like there is at best a slow trend upwards for shorter titles....


2

I think it's about aspiration, about claim-staking, and about self-importance — and, in some cases, ultimately about denying the competition. The number of one-word titles is far smaller than the number of multiple-word titles; and for a given subject, there are only a few relevant single-word titles.  So there's a certain cachet about using one of them.  (...


1

Your assertion, as others have pointed out, is incorrect. That's okay, though. I thought it might be more helpful to you to address your "disdain for one-word titles." I would say this is an unfortunate disdain you've developed, though it is borne by an astute and fortunate observation you've had. There is nothing wrong with one-word titles. On the ...


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