73

Clickbait isn't like news where you tell someone the headline so they'll click for more information. Eggplant linked to lower cancer rates. Clickbait is where they have to click just to find out the headline. This one vegetable stops cancer! There's no nuance in clickbait. Not like medical articles where you use caution about overselling things. ...


26

You have the legal right to reuse elsewhere what you post on Stack Exchange. It's your content. When posting to SE, you give SE a nonexclusive license to use it, and doing so requires that it's your content to license in the first place; see the terms of use for the details, it's referred to as Subscriber Content. So nothing legal would prevent you from ...


21

Personally, I think that's a crock. It's understandable why someone would think having a website would be a benefit, but if you have it too early-on, it will come across as amateurish at best or becomes an unnecessary financial cost at worst. As for content, if you do make a website, it doesn't have to require constant content updates, but it should be a ...


20

Click bait works by pushing psychological buttons. Most of those buttons are in the form of tangible curiosity and fear. Fear: If you don't know this hinted secret you will die Tangible Curiosity: List. "10 secrets of the incredibly famous" (your test, rewritten) Also, promises and calls to action tend to trigger people's BS reflex. So, avoid those ...


14

A common trend between your clickbait titles (and clickbait in general) is that they're promising to give you something, but only if you click in and read the article/watch the video/signup for the newsletter. As @Cyn's answer mentions, this "something" that they give is Sometimes [...] about making money, achieving fame, or curing disease. But other ...


13

Don't ever use the word if. It is a sign of lack of conviction. If you want to impose your clickbait on the audience, don't give them an opportunity to make a choice. Look at your own examples. They are affirmative. The audience feels like making a choice, but they really aren't. There are a few things I would like to add. Probably I couldn't make my point ...


12

Bloggers and vloggers by definition have an online platform on which they've built their success. Their input on the necessity of having an online platform is biased. They cannot speak for all writers. At best, they can speak for vloggers/bloggers. Think of it this way: I'm trying to become a bodybuilder. With that goal in mind, I exercise daily, tell my ...


12

If you want to be really famous you only have to click here. "you only have to click here" - you can remove that. Your audience knows how the internet works. They know that in order to receive more information, they have to click. It's obvious. "If you want to be" What do you mean, if you want? Your audience must know about your amazing secret. There is no ...


12

All of those examples imply there is some specific kind of secret knowledge you can learn quickly that will change your life. In your example, "really famous" is not specific enough. First, in writing, "really" is an intensifier without meaning. What exactly is the difference between being "famous" and "really famous"? Or "mad" and "really mad"? Even then, ...


9

What is the main topic? As algorithms change, one of the best things to do is consistently "write like a human." Just talk about Your Topic, and do it frequently. More words = more chances for the Right Words to ping. Since I'm doing a podcast, for the one where I'm fully scripting it, I'm including that script/transcript as a chance for Google and other ...


8

There are two key parts to this, and it is important to distinguish between them to help decide what steps to take and when. Domain Names vs Websites A domain name is an address, it is where people look to find a website, because it is far easier to remember www.google.com than it is to remember the string of numbers for a server hosting google's search ...


7

I have done this on my own website, more than once. Before I did it, I checked the SE license, which states that work here can be freely used and modified, but must be attributed. Personally, I did the following: I only reused my own content, I rewrote it fairly substantially, and I linked back to the original post. I don't think any of that is strictly ...


7

Every non-fiction writer should have a blog covering the topics they write about. You are trying to establish yourself as an authority on the subject, an influencer of ideas and opinions, or a curator of taste. If you write about historical subjects (or tea, or cocker spaniels), a blog about your topic/research is a great idea. People may discover your ...


6

Short answer: You can't. It takes time to create longer works. Even experienced writers will go back and edit earlier chapters, move things around, etc. If you're not experienced, you may do this even more as you learn your craft. To publish a novel, including self-publishing, it needs to be complete. You might only put out a chapter at a time, but all ...


5

As requested, I'll try to write more about my comment regarding https://www.kalaage.net First of all, I DON'T work for this site. So this is NOT an advertisement. I have used it for just a few weeks, I can say it is safe and it shouldn't be a scam. (But since I've never earned because I never qualified to get the minimum number of "Views" and "Nice reads" ...


5

In my experience, the content sites were sinking fast years ago. I honestly stopped looking. However, if you want to write quality content, it's not hard to find people looking for it. Back in the day, getting 4¢ per word was not unreasonable, but today, it probably won't happen at your typical site. Sites that pay per-word have to hire people just to ...


5

Absolutely! The Creative Commons page is here: https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ It says all the information is available to everyone, to build on and remix, and even charge money for. You are required to attribute it and link to the same CC page. The restriction is that you cannot prevent anyone else from doing the same, so if you later ...


5

If you want to publish a shorter work AND get paid for it, then it almost certainly needs to be a complete stand-alone short story, not the first chapter of a longer work. If you can successfully rewrite your chapter into a stand-alone story, then there are actually plenty of both print and online outlets that buy stories in the fantasy genre. The most ...


5

User interaction is a commitment. Moderation, as Galastel discusses, is one important component of it (use software such as Wordpress that emails you all new comments and allows you to set moderation parameters). Remember, your website is your private domain and you do not have to allow "free speech" (this has no meaning in private forums). On my personal ...


5

If your website allows interaction - leaving comments etc., there is the hidden implication that someone on your behalf keeps an eye on those interaction, at least to the extent of keeping things civil, if not to the extent of answering questions like "when is the next book coming out" and "why did you write X instead of Y). If somebody is called a moron in ...


4

At the very least, I would try to reserve the URL for your real name (or pen name), and any others that may be relevant - such as the book's name, if that's coming soon. Get a dot-com if it is available. Also reserve your name on gMail if you can. It will be easy to link a free blogger blog to that URL, or to create something from scratch later on. But ...


4

You don't need a website straightaway. But it's a good idea to begin building an online presence as a writer. Two of the best sites for doing this are: http://medium.com/ https://quora.com Forgive me if you already know about them. Medium is a communal blogging platform whereas Quora is a question and answer site. Building up a following on either of ...


4

Although I don't have experience working with a publisher, “co-brand,” and author, I did work on the flip side of this as part of the publishing company/co-brand. We reprinted seven or eight books by an author who had previously printed them thirty years ago with a different publisher. He still owned the copyright and was able to work with us, without ...


3

So, while I am in general agreement with the other answers that are saying "You Can't", let's see if we can create a situation where "You can." First, let's take a look at what your work is. Oh, it's a fantasy? Well, good for you that Fantasy is currently one of the most popular genres amongst young adult readers in many parts of the world. Let me explain: ...


3

I agree with the fact that spreading the good work is also needed escpecailly in quality writing. If you start publishing your content from an early stage on your webpage, it will on long run de-motivate you unless you are very famous in your field wiz. writer/well-Known Author. Initial days should be utilized for Quality content only. Why? well reasons are ...


3

I would like to break down your description into parts while answering this question. I've heard and read from many vlogger and blogger authors that an aspiring writer should have his own webpage as early as possible. Being published or not doesn't come to it. This completely depends on you. But your audience is limited. Today, in the world of the ...


3

This could almost be code golf -- how many clickbait elements in the fewest words (or keystrokes). CIA Officials are furious that this money-making trick has been revealed by a famous actor.


2

Why you might want to So, you don’t absolutely need it, but many published authors will recommend it. Their reasons for recommending it come down to two primary considerations: It provides a stable point of contact, a stable place where others can learn about you. For example you can put it on a business card and then hand it to a publisher and then later ...


2

https://www.asstr.org/ the Alt Sex Stories Text Repository accepts erotic stories of any type or content. It has many such stories on file, dating back many years. It is most ly oriented to disply of stories, not to critical comment from readers. Caution, image on the opening page is Not-safe-for-work. The ASSTR FAQ, under "Inappropriate Material" says: ...


2

An author website supposedly has a lot of functions, such as: Promoting one's latest book; Keeping one's audience engaged with weekly updates; Keeping track of events or conventions where the author will be; Presenting additional materials, such as cut drafts, character descriptions and whatnot; Serving as a contact point for ...


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