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In life, it is considered important to provide feedback to others effectively and constructively without offending another person (Osmond. P and Merry S 2011) Many researchers consider effective feedback as constituting clear steps. Proving feedback to my peers was quite challenging as I was scared on how they will react. I was caught between two worlds of ...


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There are many ways to do this. The POV character can just not mention something. The problem is the reader will feel cheated. I am going to focus my answer on how not to make this feel like a cheat. Make the story editorialized. Make it clear from the beginning that the story is being told in some sort of scope, like a confession, a novel,an interview, or ...


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My advice is to set your scene(s) up so that your group is split into two (or more as needed) subsets which each have an action scene that is out of view of the other group. Consider the Star Wars film "Return of the Jedi" which, at the end, had three different action elements in the destruction of the Death Star: A.) Han, Leia, Chewie, Droids, and ...


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I don't know that there is a single answer to this dilemma; the most common advice you'll likely hear tossed about for rapid POV switches is 'don't, unless you really need to.' That said, one can make just about anything work with enough skill, so if it's necessary for your story, there are a few things that can help. Hard Breaks: Horizontal rules, extra ...


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I'd recommend that you write your chapters as if you're writing a screenplay. You have to blend the best of third-person narration with the best of first-person narration. In that, you have to try to picture a movie screen and your characters on it, and just add little introspection throughout for that first-person effect. This is what I do and it works.


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