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Most first person stories, as well as many third person stories, stay in a single character's perspective. In some point of view strategies, however, you can shift perspective. For example: ... Changing perspective also demands the reader readjust after being so invested in the character whose perspective came before.


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Is there a way to frame the first person narrative within the third person narrative? For instance, Person A is in prison. He can write outgoing letters, but not receive them. So the frame story is the third person narrative on the outside, and the first-person narrative is contained within the letters. Or, the whole story is being told, after the fact, by ...


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Take a look at The Martian by Andy Weir. It's told mainly as first-person log entries of the main character, but also with third-person narratives following other people, and even some secondary out-of-band snippets following inanimate objects that become important later (e.g. the manufacturing and shipping process of a part that fails in a big way for the ...


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I assume you're talking about the author, while revising their work, making that change. And that's perfectly fine. It's a good idea, in fact, to try out different points of view. Try writing a section in first person just to see how it makes the story sound. Or read the whole thing to yourself as if it were first person. It might improve it or not. There's ...


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I've definitely seen it done and enjoyed those books. Done right, it's not confusing but you need to separate by chapters and label by name. If people aren't paying attention, they may not realize who is the subject of the chapter until a little while in but that's something you can't help.


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