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72

I can type at about 5K words per hour, but I can't write nearly that fast. I need to think of what's going on. I need to keep some sort of consistency, and I can't remember all the details. I need to do some planning. My creativity seems to burn out somewhere around 5K words each day. Putting words on the computer screen is one thing; knowing which ...


28

In theory this could be possible, but such an author would burn themselves out after a couple of days with such an intense schedule. A novel is more than just 100,000 words thrown together. There needs to be a story and characters. You need to engage the audience, ensure there are no accidental contradictions. This requires planning and revisions and this is ...


25

You are under the misguided assumption that writing is just the act of putting words on paper. The verb itself certainly has that meaning, but when applied to the writing of books, there is also conceptualizing, planning, outlining. Many works of fiction have at least the same number of words in notes and ideas. And then there is the word that I'll only ...


18

this seems to mean that they wouldn't have to spend too much time on revision or editing other than correcting a few minor mistakes here and there You seem to consider revision as error fixing, but fixing the story is another major part of revising. This is unrelated to how someone created the text (dictation, typing, ...) and involves a lot of cut/pasting ...


16

I'm used to calling the person who converts handwritten documents into (digital or ink on paper) typed manuscript a typist. They used to be a lot more common; large offices would have a "typing pool" from which, in rotation, typists would be summoned to type a job (such as producing a fair copy of a revised document, making a first draft from a handwritten ...


9

As other answers have explained, it takes time to devise engaging characters, plots, backgrounds, worlds, &c.  But some genres and styles need more of that than others; and it probably depends upon the length and quality level you're aiming for. The world record for the number of novels written in one year is 23, held by romantic novelist Barbara ...


8

I switched to Dvorak about 4 years ago due to some pain in my wrists. It took me less than a month to regain my old speed, maybe three weeks. This was the same for everyone I knew who switched cold turkey; people who went back and forth with QWERTY during the transition period took two or three months to become proficient (or gave up). After less than six ...


7

It seems to me you are looking for a scribe or scrivener. Historically, this job description was for copying from hand to hand, but it mostly has been replaced by digital formats. Currently, hand-to-hand transcriptions are performed by rabbinical students in producing a new Torah. (The clever ones memorize the Pentateuch in doing so.) Scribe: a person who ...


5

I could probably write a book every week or two by dictation. IF that book consisted of me rambling about any subject or no subject as thoughts popped into my head. But if you want an actual book, a book that would be coherent, well thought out, and interesting to read, that's an entirely different question. Maybe in ancient times when it took considerable ...


5

This is one of those questions where everybody just has to go with their own personal preferences. My last choice would be trying to dictate. I tried Dragon Diction as well, but as you have already noticed, the pauses and the less than stellar word conversion rate make it too tedious. I have done almost all of my writing by hand and then transferred to ...


4

Just keep on writing! The more you write, the more used to it you'll get :) I'm also a gamer, and English isn't my first language, so writing in English was a big struggle for me a few years back. I was generally slow to type, even in my first language. But as they say, practice makes perfect. If you're writing a relatively large story, you'll notice that, ...


4

I'm personally fond of the term amanuensis, and while I hardly ever get to use it, this sounds like the perfect legitimate need: A person employed to write or type what another dictates or to copy what has been written by another


3

It is not impossible to write something like that. I even wrote short story's on a daily basis and released a chapter every day. But the most essential part in that is a simple, but very underestimated principle: Quality needs time If you write a whole novel in 3-4 days, you can be certain, that it lacks the quality it should have. Lets take a japanese ...


3

I'm going to suggest a writing exercise! You do need to practice a new habit and I would encourage you to research alternative keyboards or keyboard layouts (strange breaks habit: learn to type in Dvorak so that you no longer know where the keys are). The others are right: otherwise you need to type a lot. But writing a lot can be hard, so make it ...


3

I oscillate between handwriting and typing. I find handwriting preferable for first drafts or for getting ideas out, as I can simply scribble on the nearest piece of paper or notebook, have arrows going everywhere - it's beautifully unstructured. I like it for first drafts as well for the same reason as Steven - it slows down my thought processes, which I ...


3

Consider whether you're likely to do a lot of typing on other people's or public computers where you won't be able to switch the layout--if that's a common occurrence, then the hassle of switching back and forth may make it not worth it. More importantly, is your typing speed currently a limiting factor to your writing? Do you compose sentences ...


3

If you require a human to type your work, then I'd say a scribe, though that may be archaic. Nowadays, a computer paired with a particular software may be faster and cheaper. These are called Optical Character Recognition, or OCR for short. Simply upload scanned images of your work, and the program will do the rest. There are plenty of free software that ...


2

I'm not sure if there is an official rule for this, but in all the examples I found online, a dash was used. On a side note, a section of terminology and definitions is often referred to as a glossary.


2

The simple approach is to give all of your subsection text a left indent, and possibly a right indent, to set it off slightly from the main section text. Any text starting at the normal left margin would then be identifiable as belonging to the main section.


2

Brains Do What Is Easiest The challenge is that our brains tend to want to do what is easy. Over the years, you've built neural pathways which fire very easily. Now those pathways fire much more quickly and cause you to continue the old behavior/habit. What you need to do is figure out some way to not allow yourself to cheat. Since it is likely you are ...


1

I don't think so. You need to first research stuff to make your content seem believable, then for everything you write you read your stuff over and over and revise and scrap and rework and struggle quite a bit to get something so good you are happy with the result. If you get happy with results too fast you are probably not having high enough standards for ...


1

I've been keyboarding for so many years that my handwriting has deteriorated past "chicken-scratch" into "hieroglyphics." If I write out a thank-you for a birthday gift, it's usually illegible by the third sentence. I literally couldn't write without a word processor. The flexibility and ease of editing, error correction, and brain-to-page is immeasurable ...


1

You could label the section Conclusions add a divider that separates it from other sections. See this question on long underscore to divide sections of text on different options. This should sufficiently differentiate from the other \subsections:


1

I am always curious about efficiency, so I tried switching to Dvorak about four years ago. Here are some notes: I didn't switch the keys since I knew I would be working on multiple keyboards; instead I printed out a cheat sheet. It took me about 3-4 weeks to get up to Qwerty speed (60-65 wpm for me). The first week I was a painful 10 wpm. Then I surpassed ...


1

I just made the switch a couple of weeks ago. I am typing a bit faster now. I avereged 69 wpm on QWERTZ and I am at about 57 on Dvorak. Switching to Dvorak can be challeging but it gets easy pretty fast. One thing that helped me switch was getting stickers for my keyboard s. They were about 3$ per sticker set and went on top of the normal qwerty layout but ...


1

Having grown up with piano lessons and computer games, I used to be able to type 110-130WPM on a QWERTY keyboard. Now, after 4 months of DVORAK, I'm at about 60WPM DVORAK and down to 90WPM QWERTY. Thus, so far it has definitely cost me tremendously in terms of speed. However, the novelty of it and knowing I'm the only one who can use my laptop more than ...


1

I used to finger pick all the time. I also use to stare at the keyboard trying to type. Now, I touch type almost as fast as the thoughts enter my mind. Sometimes, I need to stop and edit the words because I screw up; but having spent 90% of my time at a PC for the last 10 years, I have learned how to type really really well. As Some pointed out, speed ...


1

This is a late answer and completely against the current but, for me, touch typing is not important at all. When I'm typing, I'm not looking at the screen, I'm looking at the keyboard. When I press the keys quickly (using an average of 3 fingers from each hand), I'm almost forming the words inside my mind. Sometimes, I can even tell when I've misspelt ...


1

This is related to both touch typing and the Dvorak keyboard. This is not an attempt at an answer, but a testimony of my experiences. This is linked to Is touch typing skill important for being a good writer?, and How important is typing speed to a successful writing career?, and Is it worth learning to touch type, and also Is it worth switching to Dvorak? ...


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