8 votes
Accepted

Is there an industry term for a letter inquiring if a publisher is interested in a work?

The term you're looking for is "query letter." Reedsy gives several tips for writing one: https://blog.reedsy.com/guide/how-to-write-a-query-letter/query-letter-examples/
Steve's user avatar
  • 316
6 votes
Accepted

As a first time wannabe writer, should I consider going in for Traditional publishing or Self Publishing?

Traditional publishing will only hurt your pride (but that's not a bad thing): The discipline, focus, and work quality to publish in the traditional market are all things that you will want to have to ...
DWKraus's user avatar
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3 votes

As a first time wannabe writer, should I consider going in for Traditional publishing or Self Publishing?

Every successful writer was an unpublished unknown "wannabe" at one point. I've done both trad and self-publishing, so here's my advice. Self-publishing: Success is based 90% on ...
Chris Sunami's user avatar
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2 votes

How is the process of finding a company to publish your book like? How much does it averagely cost to publish your book? How do you promote your book?

Unless you are self-publishing or working with a hybrid publisher, publishing doesn't cost the author anything. While there are legitimate hybrid publishers -- writer and publisher share costs for ...
EDL's user avatar
  • 12.2k
2 votes
Accepted

Should I mention the number of books I'm planning to have in my novel series?

No, you should not mention it. Near the end, you can mention you believe there is the potential to create a book series with your character, but I'd leave it that. Just focus on selling the one book, ...
Amadeus's user avatar
  • 101k
2 votes

Should I mention the number of books I'm planning to have in my novel series?

1 When querying agents or publishers, you should display your skills and competence as a writer. It is part of a writer's ability to know what they are writing: a standalone novel, a multi-volume work,...
Ben's user avatar
  • 7,388
2 votes

As a first time wannabe writer, should I consider going in for Traditional publishing or Self Publishing?

Short answer: yes! Longer answer: Start by honing your writing skills. Here are some suggestions: Write. A lot and every day. Capture ideas. The better reception you give them, the more of them you ...
Erk's user avatar
  • 6,100
2 votes

As a first time wannabe writer, should I consider going in for Traditional publishing or Self Publishing?

Research what you have to do to publish traditionally. For instance, many publishing houses are simply closed to unagented authors. Can you get an agent? Then compare pros and cons. I will note that ...
Mary's user avatar
  • 8,964
2 votes

How do you reduce a 5-page book proposal down to 1 page?

Start by compressing the book proposal into a single sentence with at most 25-35 words. Yes, you heard me. One sentence, at most 35 words. See step 1 in "The Snowflake Method For Designing A ...
Erk's user avatar
  • 6,100
1 vote

Publishing copyright with regard to novels and comics

When you "sell" your novel to a publisher, you are settling the rights to publish that text, in specific language, into a specific market, like English language rights in North America. ...
EDL's user avatar
  • 12.2k
1 vote
Accepted

Asking editors to elaborate on their response

Asking for feedback with positivity and politely is always good. So well, the short answer is a bug Yes. However, I would rephrase your following sentence: "Out of a desire to learn, may I ask, ...
Himanshu Jain's user avatar
1 vote

As a first time wannabe writer, should I consider going in for Traditional publishing or Self Publishing?

First off, as others have advised: Start writing. Write well. Hone your craft. Decide what kind of a writer you are and what style(s) you want to develop. Writing is a discipline - some use it as ...
Leon Conrad's user avatar
1 vote

Does publishing book chapters as standalone short stories hurt recruiting an agent for the books?

Publishers (and therefore agents) will usually only publish previously unpublished works. There are two reasons for this: If your work has been available online, a portion of your audience have ...
Ben's user avatar
  • 7,388
1 vote

Does publishing book chapters as standalone short stories hurt recruiting an agent for the books?

Almost always publishers are paying authors for First Rights. If the work has already been available to the public then selling anyone the First Right would be fraud. There are circumstances where ...
EDL's user avatar
  • 12.2k
1 vote

Should I mention in my query letter to agents and/or publishers that I'm a minor?

Many agents recommend that you do not mention your age in your query letter because it might unfavourably bias the agent against you. The common suggestion is that you mention your age only when the ...
Ben's user avatar
  • 7,388
1 vote

Can a minor traditionally publish their novel?

I’m pretty certain Christopher Paolini was only 15 when his first novel, Eragon, was published, and Clare North/Kate Griffin/Catherine Webb was only 14 when Mirror Dreams came out. In my albeit ...
user60594's user avatar
1 vote
Accepted

Can a minor traditionally publish their novel?

With the exception of works for hire, copyright is owned by the author, until and unless the author assigns it to someone else. There is hardly ever a good reason to do this, so don't do it. If a ...
EDL's user avatar
  • 12.2k

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