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23

I am going to agree with Surtsey here. I do not think single word titles are the prevalent. I still think I can answer the question of what are the benefits of using a single word title. I am also going to focus on "Climb" and not "Superhot", as I think the second is just 2 words. Titles of things are there for the first time impact. You want to hear the ...


14

As with others, I think your assertion is incorrect. Based on an analysis of the 342 film title given in this list of film releases in 2019, I find that 26% of films have 1 word titles, 32% have 2 word titles, 19% have 3 word titles, 13% have 4 word titles, and the remaining 10% have 5 or more. The longest was 9 words. This shows a strong preference for ...


12

It's fine to shorten but only when the reader can fill in the blank. So far, you have: Managing a lot of people is a very difficult problem to Lot of people, difficult problem In this example, you have 3 concepts: It's about managing people There are a lot of people It's hard The most important of these is the first, that your article is about ...


10

The reason, as you guessed, is marketing. One word that sums up something memorable about a movie is a mental handle, it can appear in far larger type on a billboard, it eats up only 1 second in a 15 second commercial, it is very easy for people to recognize and associate a single word; psychologically that happens faster. If I say "Avatar" you know exactly ...


9

I think you need either a more general title for your book, or a more specific title for your first chapter. The main thing I see wrong with that is it will make it seem like the whole story is about Chapter 1, and then Chapter 2 is about ... another story? After the story? But many stories are named after the crucial event in the story. The title "When ...


9

There are 3573 entries on Goodreads with the word "f***" in the title (I only splat it for this site, not for my own sensibility). The titles contain the full word, spelled out. 2744 entries with the word s*** in the title. And so on. It's just not an issue with many publishers. It may be for others but those others likely wouldn't publish your book ...


9

The following is a VERY naive piece of research. I've downloaded the IMDB titles dataset (available here: https://datasets.imdbws.com/title.basics.tsv.gz), and took the 3rd column - primaryTitle. I then created a histogram of the number of titles containing each count of words. One very probable problem is I'm not taking language into consideration; ...


8

The Word "Legend" Evokes an Expectation Putting Legend into a title is fine, but it's a promise to your audience of something a bit larger-than-life. Given a title like "The Legend of [Protagonist]", I would personally expect something medieval, with a light touch of magic - like the Arthurian legends, with knights and quests, etc. But it would depend on ...


8

As the other answers have stated, I don't believe re-using the story's name for the first chapter is a particularly good idea, especially if it means something different later on in your story. However... Would the answer be any different if it were the last, or any other chapter? Yes. It's not unknown for anime to name their final episode after the ...


7

How about... "Crowd Management Challenges" Where "Crowd" encapsulates "lot of people" and "Challenges" implies "is a difficult problem".


7

I don't think the tag conveys the fact that there is violence, as Cyn's comment says, it sounds "old fashioned". From "Gentleman" and "Never Tells" my mind jumps to sexual trysts some woman must keep secret. It doesn't jump to informing on a client (if that is even what you meant). And because it is tag line, I assume the story is about these sexual trysts....


6

Management Difficulties Scale with Headcount Titles follow the same rule as billboard advertisements: no more than 7 words; no matter what their size. Scientifically speaking, billboard comprehension rates drop off a cliff after 7 words. Apply the same rule to your titles.


6

Chapter names serve many purposes so, as long as your choice is one that fits with other chapter names, it's fine. If you always named the chapter after the POV character then you had one named after a non-POV character, it would be confusing. But if you regularly named other chapters after events or happenings in the chapter, then naming it after a ...


5

'Primus' means 'first' in Latin. Just as you cannot copyright the word 'first', you cannot copyright 'primus'. Same goes for 'prime'. Or any other common word. If in some fantasy universe, the entity that creates whatevers is called 'The King', I can still have kings and queens in my literature, and Jordan can continue having a very real king sitting on the ...


5

Your first title is a complete sentence, which is unusual. Your second title completely drops the concept of management. Ask yourself what the core of the title is and use that. If it were me, I might distill it down to Management Difficulties or Problems in Management. You can also add a subtitle if the main title is not enough. Management Difficulties: ...


5

Every good story title is a come hither word or phrase. Phrases are usually better because they can impact more of an idea than a single word. Yes it should encapsulate an important aspect of the story, but it should intrigue the potential reader to want to read the story. Since your story, all 1600 words of it, are about someone who goes through a process ...


5

Because sometimes expressive isn't what the intent is. Sometimes a creator wants something succinct and punchy, while actually still giving enough away about the setting or premise to be intriguing. Longer titles contrary to your belief are popular, but are not necessarily any more clear, even if they are more expressive. You also have to remember that the ...


4

A tag line can work, if it is so worded as to pique interest. But one must be careful. If the tag line suggests a different type of story than the actual work is, those attracted by it may well dislike the book, review it poorly, and fail to buy anything else by the author, while those who would have liked the book might be put off by the tag, and not buy ...


3

Legends can be told in first person. Some myths from Ancient Greece, sections of the Christian Bible, Biblical Psalms, The Story of Sinuhe (from Middle Kingdom Egypt), and many others are first person narratives. But you're asking specifically about a first person narrative by the character who is the one who is legendary. The answer is still yes. ...


3

No drawbacks, except for quoting trademarks, and for setting expectations. Quoting trademarked sentences may be bad "I'm lovin' it." may have the drawback of a fast-food chain sending their lawyers knocking at your door. Quoting may just happen, make it obvious On the other hand, the number of possible quotes from the existing wealth of literature ...


3

What is it about? What will entice a reader to read it without deceiving them about the content? Is there a sentence in the text that will intrigue? What is your message? Is any one of these the title?


3

Inspired by @Ran Locar's answer, I had a look at all films that came out by year and the (naive) word count of each title. The dataset I used was this Kaggle set, so if the original question specifically thinks this trend changed in the past two years then this won't help. However, it looks to me like there is at best a slow trend upwards for shorter titles....


2

I'm not sure about this specific tag line, but tag lines in general definitely appeal to me as a reader. Even if the tag line catches my eye because I think it's ridiculous, it still catches my eye. And usually I end up reading the back of the book or inside description at a minimum. So I would say that tag lines definitely work, and are usually way more ...


2

You likely need to do a trademark search, and see if the title is trademarked. Go to The USPTO (United States Patent and Trademark Office). Select "Basic Word Mark Search", the first option in the list. For the Search Term, put in your title: For example, "Dead Like Me" (without the quotes). This is the name of a sci-fi show. You will find it WAS ...


2

I recently finished reading a novel in translation to English from Russian. The title was in Latin (in the original edition, the title was transliterated to Russian, but the English edition was in English transliteration.). In this case, the authors (a duo) used a Latin phrase because it had meaning within the book. None of the characters spoke Latin (or ...


2

I don't think the "unauthenticated" part is necessary, but a legend is a story told about somebody else, a traditional story, and it can't be a "tradition" if it is being told for the first time by the MC. In fiction, an original story titled a "legend" is fine, but the pretense would have to be this was done long ago by the MC and is being told once again.


2

I think it's about aspiration, about claim-staking, and about self-importance — and, in some cases, ultimately about denying the competition. The number of one-word titles is far smaller than the number of multiple-word titles; and for a given subject, there are only a few relevant single-word titles.  So there's a certain cachet about using one of them.  (...


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