33

What sort of time period are we looking at? Hours? Days? Weeks? Months? Over a period of hours, it's going to be things like the angle of shadows (how high in the sky the sun is), the temperature, et cetera. At days, it comes down to water breaks: a dead slave is worth no money, so they need to be given something to drink occasionally. Are the ...


20

What does the time spend hiding do to your character? Pick things that start off easy to manage, but becomes hard to maintain (especially under stress or pressure), and talk about those. For example, if they are squeezed into a wardrobe, staying as still as possible: As the villain paced the room, she shivered in her hiding spot. Every time he walked out ...


16

One possibility is to just say that time has passed. "The two men sat staring at each other, neither saying a word, for fifteen minutes." Another possibility is to fill the time with action. If the point is that it was a tense standoff, "action" here probably doesn't mean people running and fighting, but events appropriate to the situation. "Bob locked the ...


10

Changes of light, of temperature, of weather, of season. Unremembered wear in clothing, the healing of wounds, loss of physical condition. Hair longer than ever before. Sudden brutal grooming from the captors and subsequent regrowth. Being let out to push a wagon out of mud. Sickness in the camp. Raiders, fended off. Capture by the raiders, and subsequent ...


8

My favorite way to pass time to to make the characters get lost in their thoughts. What was that? A floorboard creeking? It must just be a mouse. At least Jim hoped it was. It wasn't supposed to end this way... ever since he sold the doughnuts to Sally, she had begun to suspect that they were running an underground operation. Doughnuts. How could he have ...


7

I think George R. R. Martin does this quite well in his various novels. A good few characters in A Song of Ice and Fire are locked up at some point, and GRRM always dedicated a good couple of pages at least to hammering home how long they've been in captivity. These chapters often deal with the mental toll of being confined to a place with no brain ...


5

It's done all the time: I wouldn't worry too much about this. Characters leave the main story all the time and pop up later - sometimes whole books later. At that point, you need to be sure they are tied back in (especially if they had a mysterious death or the like). But readers accept it. That's not your question, though. If you want to emphasize that the ...


4

This is really a POV question. Are the updates to character B's life known and important to character A, the current POV character? If "yes," you report on them, if "no," you don't. If character A is self-centered, or if character B is not a significant person in their life, then they might not care. If character B is very important to ...


4

There are some great answers to this question already. I could see many scenarios where one could use a mix of the suggestions in the answers. Another idea is to use visual cues, such as sunlight, to suggest that time has passed; Tom pulled the door from inside the cabinet, leaving it just open enough to see the table in the room across the hall, where the ...


4

Set the scene: To make a time gap pass, you need to set the stage for your reader. In visual arts, you can LITERALLY set the stage, but for a book, you need to use words. First, create a cliffhanger moment. There is a clear moment you define exactly what will happen. Then, when you stop the action for your gap, the reader can easily fill in the missing time -...


4

In addition to @Chronocidal's answer, you can also use nature to show the passage of time. Even within the confines of a wagon with no outside view, you could have mice that are breeding. They can have up to 10 litters a year, so plenty of generations to be born, grow up and leave. And if you can cast a glance outside through a slit in the wagon or ...


3

If it were a film, you might likely see a montage of the prisoner waking and each time either falling back into a stupor, being drugged, or beaten, or fed. They might get progressively more dirty and unkempt. You might see this overlaid with the wagon constantly riding through the countryside. In written medium you must convey this explicitly but you can. ...


3

Some suggestions that aren't 'meanwhile' "At the time (that x was happening), our hero awoke at the first turn of a plot twist." "While...." "Several light years away on planet X..." "At the exact point where john was standing, but 15,000 years before that moment..." "Much earlier -- almost 4,00 generations before ...


2

It depends a lot on the content and detail level. Based just off of the numbers you've given, it definitely seems like a lot of paper for one day. Doing a quick guestimation on some of my works, a day in which stuff happens(ie fighting, working, etc, not sick and in bed all day) will range from 3-6 thousand words, mostly in the same chapter but sometimes ...


2

Two things you should know about time travel; 1- it's confusing sometimes. 2- its really really confusing the rest of the time. I wouldn't use meanwhile between time jumps, or at least not to follow the time machine because where the time machine is going is probably not happening around the same time the time machine exited time. I would use 'X years before,...


2

If your character is a man (in the sense "not a boy anymore"), you could use his beard growing as an indication of time passing.


2

Are you using first-person perspective or do just want to show instead of telling? Do you want the character to be aware of the time passing or just the reader? Do they need to notice time passing as it passes or would it be an option to have the character realize sometime after the arrival that the time has passed? If it is first-person and you want to ...


2

Your choice! The most common grammatically correct ones are: p.m./a.m. or PM/AM I personally use the first one, but both are correct. Hope this helps!


2

It depends. How well do you hide it? If it's obvious, then the reader may possibly feel cheated. It also depends on the reader. Some will notice, some will not. Some will feel cheated, some will not. I honestly wouldn't care, as long as the story was good, but I'm not everyone. Just make sure it's hidden well and written well.


2

Is your villain searching for the main character? Or is it a standoff? You could perhaps briefly elaborate on what the villain is doing in the room and how the main character (if hidden) can see the villain's every move. Possibly explain what the main character is going through at that moment(elevated heart rate, sweaty palms, fast breaths, and so on) or ...


1

The MC glanced at his watch/mobile phone. A whole hour had passed already and he was beginning to get ...


1

1: "Every second was one second too much." 2: "Every second was passed in agony."


1

You might like to use dialogue between the slavers to imply the passage of time. They might reference how long the journey has been going, how long is left, meal-times, etc. Dialogue can be a natural way to push information you want the reader to have.


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