10

You don't have to explain much in sociopathy. Read Understanding the Sociopath: Cause, Motivation, Relationship, in "Psychology Today." An excerpt: In the media, I'm often asked what causes sociopathy. "Are they born this way?" is one of the most frequently asked questions. The truth is that we don't know. Stout (2005) sums up the research well, ...


8

The antagonist clearly has some deep rooted connection with your MC. If he goes as far as hacking, stalking and trying to seduce your MC. He probably has been fantasizing about her or someone very similar to her for a very long long time. People don't go sociopath overnight after all. I guess he got everything he wanted when he was young too. Getting all ...


6

I think it is not necessary to read about writing thrillers to write them. Insted, I'd read thrillers directly, so you can see how they're written. However, you can also check these links with some advices: http://www.wikihow.com/Write-a-Thriller-Novel http://www.creative-writing-now.com/how-to-write-a-thriller.html http://davidmorrell.net/on-writing/...


6

Drawing your reader into the emotions of the moment is the trick to writing horror. No creature or situation is inherently scary unless the reader already relates to and cares about the character who is facing it. Even then, it is not the details of the creature or situation which makes it scary. It is the character's response which draws the reader into ...


6

Can you do it? Sure. As opposed to what? Do you think the Mystery Novel Police will arrest you for breaking the rules of the genre? The question is not, "Am I allowed to do this?", but "Does it make a good story?" If the answer to the second question is "yes", then do it. If as you write this story you discover that it's not working, that the story is ...


5

The defining characteristic of the thriller genre is suspense. That is, the audience expects something bad to happen. Suspense can be created if the audience knows more than the main character. For example, when Little Red Riding Hood starts talking to the wolf, we expect her to be eaten, while she is blissfully unaware of any danger. Suspense can also be ...


5

Being frank, older teens, sixteen-plus, as you said, can handle a lot, and likely will feel insulted/not challenged if there isn't any convincing peril in your story. While your prose certainly shouldn't relish in carnage and violence on the level of A Clockwork Orange or delve into the utterly depressing and pessimistic like 1984, a little bit of 'edginess' ...


5

Amadeus has a great answer about narcissistic sociopaths. I do think it might be valuable to consider an answer wrapped around a question though: What kind of story do you intend to write? It seems that you are going for a contemporary genre fiction type story where it is a really good idea to give the antagonist some motivations and try to highlight ...


4

I think you can have both in the story. I think the reader won't feel cheated as long as you don't make a big geographical mistake. What you can do is to add little details to add some familiarity, and use the rest to produce something fresh (the unique way in which the character sees the world). For instance, in the novels I read, authors describe the ...


4

Make the atmosphere and the perspective serve the story, not vice versa. It's a different story if your own home - the place you know in and out - transforms into a battle arena and either serves as your weapon, its nooks and crannies providing an advantage over the oppressor, or a traitor - a years-old companion turning on you and places you knew to be ...


4

Hell, the Animorphs series could get very frank at times with the themes of war and the moral implications of a guerilla war on children... There was a point in my reading where the ploy of having one of the heroes lose a limb (in an animal morph) was kind of something the series had desensitized me too. In the 13th Book, they have an alien essentially ...


4

At 16, the books our school recommended included 1984 and All Quiet on the Western Front. Crime and Punishment was part of the matriculation exam at 17. Also at 17, we were visiting Auschwitz. You don't get more horror than that. Which is to say, you can put any amount of horror in a novel for 16+ audience. By this point, teenagers are adults enough to ...


4

Most mysteries don't exist in isolation, but rather they are manifold, take one of my favourites, Roanoke, there are several mysteries within the mystery of the Roanoke disaster: where did the colonists try to go? where did they actually end up? when did they leave? and most "interestingly" what on Earth does "CROATOAN" mean? So multiple related mysteries ...


3

As long as both mysteries are resolved, I don't see a problem with it. +1 Ash for Columbo. Also, there was recently some miniseries on TV about a woman, a young mother. In the opening, she inexplicably attacks a man and murders him in front of many people. The mystery is not who did it, or how to prove it, but why: Even she does not know why she did it, and ...


3

The tricks to writing gore-free, short, chilling stories in the nature of hunter and prey are: Think about what scares you. This will be different for everyone, but if you can get a handle on your own personal fears and write about them then you will find that this experience comes over more realistically in your writing. Writing about your own fears in ...


2

It's the same kind of silent/non-immediate terror that happens when a virus epidemic strikes. There is fear of the future even if the person doesn't have the disease or doesn't know anybody who has it. With cyber attacks, you could definitely play up the tension of "What will happen next? Could he break in? Is he willing to hurt people?" and while it's ...


2

You can create tension by saying it is dangerous. Like 'The terrorist has hacked our computers, only God knows what is next! He could do anything!' and stuff similar to these. You can also have one of your characters say what was on the computers and why the terrorist getting his hands on that info is harmful. Also, in popular culture, it is shown that ...


2

The classic antagonist against a white hat hacker is black ice, but that is still fictional. Black ice is computer countermeasures which can literally kill the attacker despite their distance from the scene of the crime. Grey ice, identity discovering countermeasures can also be great sources of tension for the hacker. However, to make this question and ...


2

Learning to write any genre of fiction is mostly the same set of skills - character exposition, scene setting, pacing, and so on. Start with the general and then move on to the specifics would be my suggestion. I don't follow the thriller genre much, but in my chosen genre (science fiction) there are a lot of popular authors who write blogs where they ...


2

Focus on the protagonists' emotional state, their panic and despair as they're hunted down by whatever is chasing them. You need never show or tell the reader what is actually after the runners, it's enough to know that they're scared half to death by the situation. Also remember the hierarchy of awful things, in increasing order; monsters you can see/hear (...


2

Thrillers are about nearly constant conflict and keeping the reader constantly wondering how something will turn out in the next few minutes / pages. I say "nearly" because you need some "story" scenes in there, pauses for the reader to catch their breath and learn what happened, but more so than any other movie, the thriller is a ...


2

Love the question! IMO It is very distinct from the gore fest that makes a good horror. A good thriller will grab your interest - you won't be able to put it down. It will sometimes leave you breathless. It will leave you wanting more every time you have to turn the page. And you will feel a sense of loss when the book is done, not because the ending was ...


1

This is really long, so there is a tldr at the bottom in case you want to skip to how its applied to your genre. So I think there are basically three main principles for great horror of any type. And I don't think it is specific to natural settings. The first two apply specifically to horror and basically boil down to this: the key to horror is not in what ...


1

"... the event that triggered his sociopathy and what could motivate him to do what he does ..." Questions to ask yourself: Do you have sociopaths in your life? (if so talk to them) Do you have sociopathic tendencies? (if so have a word with yourself) Do you have an interest in sociopaths? (if not why are you writing about one?) Do you see the benefits of ...


1

Goosebumps would probably be your closest bet to what you are looking for. It is children/teen series that does a PG horror/thriller story. I use to read them a ton growing up and I hate horror or thrillers for that matter.


1

That depends on the size of the page, the margins, and the font. Print a page or two in the format you want, or find a book in that format, and count the number of characters per page. Then divide your total number of characters by that number and you'll have your answer.


1

Make them care about the people affected by the attack in the same way as they would care if it happened to them or to a friend or family member. Fictional situations that do not put anyone's life at threat can actually be more tense than life-threatening situations because (a) there is less reassurance to the reader from the conventions of fiction, and (b) ...


1

these kind of attacks aren't as exciting as direct terror attacks Au contraire, they are as exciting as you write them to be. Your job, as the author, is to convey the emotion you want your reader to feel. Whether excitement, fear, abandonment, ecstasy; no matter. My simplest advice to you is that if you can't make it exciting, then you're not excited by ...


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