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6

The biggest pitfall I find with third person present tense is that it can start to sound like a movie script. Like stage directions. He goes to the fridge and opens it. It's empty. So he closes the fridge and walks to the cupboard. Feels kind of stale, doesn't it? It's just action beat after action beat. My advice, therefore, would be to bear this in mind ...


3

Correct them, no. But a tool like AutoCrit can highlight all verbs written in a specific tense. I've never actually used this tool before so I can't speak to its quality, but you might find it helpful. Keep in mind no fancy proofreading program actually understands your writing. While a program might detect a verb's tense, it can't detect whether your slip ...


2

It depends on the time you pick for your narrator to tell the story. If he's reminiscing of his youth in his old age, the physical description probably doesn't apply anymore, and women no longer react to him the same way they used to when he was younger. In that case, he would tell of his experiences in the past tense. Similarly, even if only a comparatively ...


2

Depends on the voice! You want the character to sound consistent. First, you want it to be the voice to be consistent with the character, and then you want to be consistent with the manner in which the character is telling the tale. You have some flexibility here, because readers will accept first-person narrators who are not recounting a tale to their ...


1

I'm currently writing a sci-fi fantasy in third person limited using present tense. If you use an action beat (which in present tense is the default) you can write it plainly. This approach will sound like a play-by-play; my advice for this, use it sparingly and when you want the flow to be quick. You can cover a battle like this. Now for the rest of the ...


1

A moment in time: I'm not a travel guide or an English major. Feel free to do what you like, I don't think there are absolute rules. It really only matters if you think it sounds right. There are statements that will sound totally valid in present tense. If I were writing this for the future, I'd use past tense as much as seemed practical. Think of a ...


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