54

Add spices and Mix: I think the problem is you are thinking of your writing as infodump. Not all infodump is always bad, but no one really likes it. What you should do, however, is figure out what the scene adds to the story and integrate the details into a cohesive whole. The content that makes it essential should be visible in the paragraph, and convey the ...


19

Compare your paragraph to He went and bought a bread and yoghurt for the homeless guy. This is omitting a little bit of information compared to your paragraph: I don't specify that the grocery store is located back where the protagonist came from, and nearby. This may vary from place to place, but I'd expect a grocery store to be nearby in an urban setting ...


14

The reader must understand what happened, which is why I mentioned every action the character made I want to question this, because I think it's a big driver of bad writing. Why are the actions important? Are they interesting actions? No. Do they explore the character? Well, not the way you've written them. DWKraus has explored how you can address those, ...


8

If it's a drudge to write it, it is a drudge to read it. I (as a reader) don't want to read this: He turned around and started walking to the nearby store. He bought a bread and a yoghurt. Then he came back and gave the groceries to the homeless guy. That is a drudge to read. It tells me unneeded details of mundane things - and honestly, it leaves out ...


4

There are two sides of writing. First, is the glorious act of creation, thinking up plots, fleshing out characters, and building worlds. Then there is the mundane, blue-color work of making all of those dreams make some kind of sense (also known as revisions). I think that you are asking about the second and less glamorous part of the job. I will tell you ...


2

Skip[p]ing any of the actions may confuse reader as it would sound as hero conjured something out of nowhere. The reader can probably guess where the groceries came from, but if you want to make it more explicit, discussing things that happened in the past for which the focus is how they relate to the current situation is what perfect tenses are for: He ...


2

He turned around and started walking to the nearby store. He bought a bread and a yoghurt. Then he came back and gave the groceries to the homeless guy. That's a great act of kindness, but why did he do it? Adding the "why" can make a large difference between "drudge" and "character building". Clark noticed Jessie up ahead, ...


1

I had this problem for years. In fact, I think all writers do. You can't experience your writing the way other people do, because you bring so much personal context to each word and scene. I think you're actually asking two separate questions here. In terms of structure, there's a lot of good books that can help you learn how to bring order to your writing. ...


1

If your goal is to attract scholars, or serious readers of non-fiction, avoid the word "often". It's a word used to brush over something that may not be true, and to, as you noticed, weasel your way out of things. Specific arguments require specific data. "Often, if a country decides to go to war, few actual people are in agreement about it.&...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible