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The other answers have covered software numbering thoroughly, so I'll skip right to spacecraft. You get a wide variety of naming patterns for spacecraft, but generally not the 1.2.3.1234 style numbers currently popular with software. Here's some examples: SpaceX: Falcon 1 - the 1st Falcon model, and has 1 engine in its first stage. Falcon 9 - the 2nd ...


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Just to add to this list, a common method is "semantic versioning". There's a Wikipedia article explaining it which is worth reading. It's widely used where multiple components and dependencies are involved. Another method (used by Microsoft) is Major.Minor.dateA.dateB. The build date and time is encoded in the last two fields. When a new version is built ...


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Typically, if we are going to introduce any shorthand for a long name (including initializing it), the first time we use it in full and then note the shorter name we will use throughout: This can just be the shortened name in parentheses if no worded explanation is needed; (xxx) implies "hereinafter xxxx". Or it can be an actual sentence to introduce it. ...


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Software numbering There are lots of schemes in use, and sometimes software vendors even switched between schemes. The most important feature of numbered schemes (as opposed to pure naming schemes like "Windows ME, XP, Vista") is that the version numbers always increase, that is, later versions get greater version numbers (what "greater version number" ...


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Software version numbers tend to be company or endeavor specific as @JonStonecash covers nicely. A few examples: Ubuntu releases their Linux distribution twice a year in April and October and uses a date format of YY.MM, but they also use fanciful names going up the alphabet such as Bionic Beaver for 18.04. I have a tiny project of my own which is ...


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I developed software for many decades for several organizations. The standards for versioning were varied, but there are some general guidelines that most of them followed. I will call the leftmost number in the version identifier, the Version. The releasing organization will change this number when there are major changes in the feature set of the ...


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Generally you indent every paragraph that follows another paragraph. So in your example, you'd indent the paragraph before the list, but not the paragraph after the list. Agreed that it can look a little odd when the explainer paragraph is short, but you do it for consistency of approach. If it is way too distracting, you can try introducing a sub-subhead: ...


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Robert Lauriston is correct. <> is the proper way to document user input in code in Microsoft Documentation. Many folks are suggesting using % signs to document user input in documentation, That would be incorrect in Microsoft Documentation. % signs are used as system environment variables in Microsoft. i.e. %SystemRoot% refers to the installation ...


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Screenshots can also come to the right or left of text that references them. Using columns can improve readability and keep illustrations from being separated across pages from the text that references them.


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All instructions writers wrestle with these terms. Just remember that instructions should be absolutely clear, without ambiguity. "Preferred" can be ambiguous. Does a "preferred" printer stay that way? Are you referring to a "preferred" printer, or just a printer to use now? Select the printer to use (for whatever you are doing). Avoid "desired" and ...


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One possibility is to not use the adjective: "Select a printer". Another is to use the adjective appropriate to the action: Sometimes you mean "Select a disk", sometimes (like for formatting) you mean "Select the target disk", sometimes (for installing an OS) "Select the desired boot disk", etc. I wouldn't look for just one word. "Preferred" is sometimes ...


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