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12

Where to put the a tl;dr or summary is going to vary depending on the piece. For example, an email from I.T. warning about a change will include the most important information and what users need to do upfront, and then may include further details beneath that for those who are curious. Having the tl;dr at the beginning means people are more likely to see ...


9

Your query is meant to introduce the book and make clear why it's compelling. That doesn't require you to explain its plot in detail, particularly if the plot isn't the compelling aspect of it. On the other hand, you can't just write "My novel is called [TITLE HERE], it's very funny, you should totally check it out." So you need a core aspect of your novel - ...


7

So what is the highlight? Is it a character study of lunatics? A farce? A satire of a particular genre? A giddy romp across space and time? A surreal exploration of the absurdities inherent in our classist political system? A synopsis for a cover letter is really your elevator pitch — boil your book down into the fewest words which describe it, not ...


6

What is your book about, really? Not "a Devon village". Is it about relationships? Is it about the skeletons in people's closets? Is it about the tiny day-to-day bits of kindness people do for each other? Answer to yourself what your book is really about, then structure your synopsis around that. For example, if your book is about the skeletons in people's ...


6

You pick one version and test it. A test says more than a thousand theories, so just keep going. The Snowflake Method is an iterative method where you're allowed/encouraged to go back and "fix" things after each step. You're even encouraged to go back and adjust the Snowflake after you've written about halfway into the actual first draft. Pick the one ...


5

I think you are focussing too much on introducing the characters in the synopsis too much. You are telling a mystery tale. Let a reader discover who are the characters later, it is not important to an agent. Focus instead on the situation and the atmosphere of the story. Leave a veil of mystery on the characters and their motives. You want to pitch your ...


3

The tl;dr at the end is often the result of an unthinking or lazy writer. For example on a Q&A-site like this, someone reads a question, feels an inclination to reply, and begins to write an answer before they think their answer through. As a result, they think while they write and only understand what they want to say when they come to the end of what ...


3

Quote from the linked source, which pretty much summarizes the article: ...if you ever send me five page synopsis for every 15K words I'll toss it unread. 3-5 is the MAX no matter how long your novel is. And no cheating by using 5pt fonts and .25 inch margins. Synopsis are not a blow for blow recitation of the plot. It's major points, turning points, ...


3

I've usually seen it posted at the bottom, end of post, usually quoted or bolded to stand out. It could be placed in the top of the post, but I think the purpose (whether stated or not) is there to summarize what the author posted. At the front doesn't have the same impact. It seems more like an intro/ summary. They are hoping you read their post, or ...


3

Your description has to be about the setup — the 5% that isn't about the discovery. Or maybe the first 10%, after the initial discovery which gets your protagonist over the threshold of the adventure. The rest will have to be vague puffery about the wonders of discovery, adventure, fantasy, thrills and chills, etc.


2

Unless you already have a completed manuscript, you are putting the cart before the horse. If you intend to use an agent, you'll need to see what that agent requires, which is usually a query--outline, sample chapter, synopsis, and so on. Most agents (and publishers) no longer need or want the manuscript in paper format. Each has differing requirements (...


2

1) Would seven mentioned characters in a synopsis be too much/too difficult to track? Is there another way to avoid this confusion other than simply labeling some of them as "the group"? The length of a synopsis can be one full single-spaced page to four full pages depending on the agent and genre. 600 words is on the short end. On the other hand, seven ...


1

I'd be inclined to put a summary at the beginning, similar to an abstract in an academic paper. That way people would see it first, those who were interested could read further, and those who were not would still see the summary. Putting it at the end might lead those who weren't particularly interested to feel they had wasted time getting there, and those ...


1

I have used www.scribophile.com in the past to get critiques for short stories and other pieces of writing with decent success. A quick search through the site's Groups area and I found the www.scribophile.com/groups/query-and-synopsis-crit-trades/ group, but the forums on the site are also a good place to ask. Hope this helps and happy writing :)


1

Randy Ingermanson ("the Snowflake guy") writes about this in his June 2012 E-zine, taking The Hunger Games as example, mostly for writing character synopses. Introduce the main character and her main story arc. Add the second character and his story arc, etcetera. In your case perhaps you can describe the main character and her time period. Same for the ...


1

As I see it from here, your question itself looks like a potential solution. Yes, I mean, if you could reword it and include bits from your work itself, in a creative way, that should really impress any literary agent. Look at it this way: giving away much in a summary/ abstract has never been a good idea anyway. Even as it serves to arouse curiosity, it ...


1

For fiction it is present tense, because that's the way we summarize stories naturally. You say: The story is about a kind of dwarf who has to destroy a powerful ring. You do not say: The story was about a kind of dwarf who had to destroy a powerful ring. But you have written a memoir, not fiction. There it is natural to tell it in past tense, no ...


1

Sounds right to me. The pitch is a letter which you write to the publisher, and since the book is about you, the pitch should be from your perspective. Today, those events happened in the past, but they happened to you. So first person, past tense. When summarizing a memoir for something like Wikipedia, the summary is not from you (even if it is, the ...


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