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0

To be honest, it depends on if any character arcs are being explored through the fight. If the result is all that matters, then eh, skip to it. But if there's layers of doubt being overcome, grief being felt, self-discovery occurring through percussive maintenance, et cetera, then be sure to focus on that aspect of the fight rather than a play-by-play.


0

Overlap. People interrupt each other. Characters will have certain 'trigger issues' that they just can't keep quiet about and wait for the other character to finish their dialogue.


1

What you need to do is put the emotional condition of the viewpoint character front and center, not the gore of the scene. Hannibal Lecter would have a very different emotional response to a gory sequence than, say, Buddy the Elf. Write from the viewpoint character's reaction. Also, consider that what the reader will feel is not gore, but fascination, or ...


1

Not a style guide, but for adding nuance to this discussion I'd like to suggest the talk "Linguistics, Style and Writing in the 21st Century" by Steven Pinker, held at the Royal Institution. Summary: Does writing well matter in an age of instant communication? Drawing on the latest research in linguistics and cognitive science, Steven Pinker replaces the ...


0

I'm not at all sure what you mean with "a perverse pit of debauchery". Apocalyptic Mad Max/Dark Angel, or what a school teacher from 1850 would say about the sexual habits of millennials–or pretty much anyone from the 21st century? But I hope my answer will be applicable regardless! Even if society gets really bad, chances are your characters won't ...


0

So I'm sure you've read the first Harry Potter book, where Harry is absolutely convinced Snape is the villain of the piece and all evidence seems to point to this. Snape is muttering an incantation as Harry's broom goes haywire during a Quidditch Match, only to stop when Hermione sets his robes on fire and he breaks contact. Later Harry overhears Snape ...


0

Given that is this a serial, you may be misinterpreting the reader comments. From what you've reported, you've done exactly what you planned to. You've introduced a cliffhanger where the hero acts out of character. And you've successfully established that character to the point that people recognize that fact. More importantly, you've made them care. ...


0

If you use a first-person narrator, no problem. Readers expect a first person narrator to reflect the knowledge and opinions of that person. If I was reading someone's diary and read, "I met the boss", and then later he says, "Oh, that wasn't really the boss, they fooled me", I wouldn't say he lied, just that he was mistaken. A third person narrator can be ...


1

In a third-person limited (or first-person) narrative, deceiving the MC and deceiving the reader are pretty much the same thing, since the reader only knows as much as the protagonist. In this case, there's nothing wrong with a little deception. One of my favourite adventure games, Another Code: Two Memories, actually does exactly what you describe: I didn'...


-1

You mentioned that you think the differences within genders are larger than the differences between genders. Women, men, and non-binary people span the entire gamut of personalities, so what actually separates the genders? As long as the characters exist in a society with genders (not raised by wolves or agender aliens or something) they will have ...


3

This is a fascinating question and I agree with the main response: to explain something like that, you probably need to introduce the mechanism earlier rather than later. You left it ambiguous whether you were talking about a serial that’s already published, or a draft sent out to test-readers. The advice to revise the draft is extremely good if you are in ...


1

Generally I write female characters as "softer" and male characters as "harder." I have no idea what that means and some how intuitively, when I write, it makes sense. I've never had anyone read my writing and say "no woman would ever say that" or accuse me of having written a feminine man...unless I wanted them to. When I'm writing a female character or ...


11

+1 colmde. I'd say you can just be careful with your wording, so technically you did not lie to the reader. Don't have the narrator call him "the boss". I will add an example: The fat man listened to the piece in his ear, then said, "The boss will be here in a minute. Show some respect." MC said nothing, he just took his seat. A gray-haired man ...


3

SHOW, DON'T TELL. Don't name the guy, don't say he's a boss or a fake boss. Describe the encounter in sufficient detail, in such a way that the reader is convinced (wrongly) that the guy is the boss, same as the MC.


1

Don't have the narrator mention the word "Boss" at all. The meeting was likely scheduled by someone, they can be the one to deceive the MC telling them, "You'll meet the boss at 123 Fake St. at 2:00", as well as maybe the fake boss themselves (by acting as if they are the boss, etc.) Other clues that this guy is the real boss can be in the mind of the MC ...


5

Agree with the readers Very recently, I came upon a bit of storytelling that almost made me lose interest in the story because I honestly thought it was a logical mistake that would have really taken me out of it. Basically, an action the main character made changed the action of a different character, even though they were completely sealed off from one ...


14

The problem you're describing is one that happens within third-person omniscient narrative, and therefore isn't a problem within your third-person (limited) POV. But I will tackle the problem as if you are writing omniscient. It is really just a case of whether you want to deceive the reader of the MC. Deceiving the MC is quite easy, in theory, as the ...


18

When the narrator is wrong about something in the book's world, it's called an unreliable narrator. When a narrator has a single point of view (sees through one character's eyes) then it's inevitable that some information is unreliable. Readers understand that. With a 3rd person narrator you're also doing some factual description based on what the ...


6

Given the phrase "After releasing an issue", I get the impression that you are releasing this story serially. I think is a significant part of the problem. If you essentially ended this release of your story with this event, then the problem basically boils down to this. You had the main character do something wholly and completely out-of-character. By ...


2

If the narrator is clearly non-omniscient, from the main character's perspective, then you describe things as the main character would describe them. The audience will not feel lied to in the reveal, so long as they know that the narration is from that perspective. Just think of any story involving a mystery, where the narrator character thinks that X is ...


4

There must be logic I believe it is important to always let the readers understand the logic of your character's actions. Even if the character is super evil, his motivation should be one the readers can sympathize with. Rather his methods are what could be despicable. For instance, a villain wanting to save the world... by destroying society and starting ...


28

What you should have done, and should do in rewrite, is make it clear to the reader a traitor exists, perhaps make it clear a poison that does exactly that exists, etc. You can do that early in your book, in a story or fable. The readers already believe the MC would never do this thing. So you need to hang a lantern on this behavior during the battle. Say ...


0

You can associate your character with something else, thats easier to remember. For 7 you could use the 7 colours of the rainbow or the 7 weekdays. This is only appropriate for some storys though ,probably fantasy. Because the characters are either linked by destiny or some organization or a preordained plan, or because they all found connected artifacts... ...


1

Most readers don't care so much about names. Same as any other word in speed reading they look at the first letter, last letter and length, and then guess what the word is. When they come to a complex name they will just nickname the character and move on. Petyr Baelish instantly becomes Peter. For those readers that may obsess over pronunciation you can ...


3

A story is usually ordinary, believable, interesting only to the extent you care about the characters or the happenings in it. A legend is bigger than that. It lasts, it is passed down, and as it passes from mouth to mouth it shifts a little. "This chair was made by my great grandfather for his first child and has been with us ever since" is a story. "This ...


10

Legends are defined by the cultures who created them Legends reflect the values of their culture. Sacred hospitality and the inevitability of fate were popular themes for the Greeks. The Norse Eddas focus on personal sacrifice for power and knowledge several times. Russian fairy tales celebrate kind fools. Some cultures revere tricksters, other demonize ...


5

Apart from Campbell's "The Hero's Journey", another source of archetypal knowledge is folktales. You could take a look at the work of Vladimir Propp and his analysis of Russian folktales. Both Campbell's and Propp's works describe a structure common to many stories of each category: the repetition of three, leaving the normal world, the appearance of a ...


3

I think of legends and mythology (I took a college elective on it) as being about black-and-white extremes, like writing for children too young to process nuance, too young to appreciate flawed heroes or sympathetic villains. Hercules is the good guy. Heaven and Hell, Mount Olympus or the Underworld, are polar opposites, it is either 100% good or 100% bad. ...


0

You ask two questions. 1) Yes. 2) Ask yourself "What do I know about writing?" and then write down your thoughts. When you're done squeezing that out, research, by yourself, additional things about writing that are objectively true. Now we're going to imagine that's done. Ask yourself "What is good writing, or at least something a person would read ...


7

Firstly, don't get disheartened. Writing is a skill that takes practice and the more you do it, the better you will get. You may have a longer road that some if your ADHD makes it difficult to concentrate on complete sentences? But even if that's so, don't let that discourage you. It's not a race, you may just take a bit longer to complete a project. If I ...


2

What strikes me is the lack of detail. I'm having trouble picturing the scene with what's given. There's more to a scene than just action. A character who's in danger shouldn't notice much besides the threat - you have the right idea there. But even then, there are other details he should notice - both about the threat itself and how he can deal with it. ...


2

First off, having played around with many different "ways" to write stories for many years I've come to the conclusion that if I don't pick and choose what works and do my best with it my writing career will only consist of having read how-to-books on writing... So, in general, focus more on writing a story your readers like than how you write it. A few ...


3

When structuring your branching narrative, try to separate your character arcs from "stuff that happens". Allow your heroes to retain their moral character, and give the reader control over the action. Decisions should not be easily lumped into morally "good" and morally "bad". Instead they should be compromises, both good and bad. The player attains a ...


1

Humour can ease tension and lighten the mood when things get dark, but that line seems better omitted. The line you mention in the situation you describe seems to undercut the tension of the scene. Watching a building, preparing to rescue a friend and that line runs the risk of making light of the entire situation. Why should the reader care if the author ...


4

If the scene is supposed to be dramatic, a joke is out of place. Personally I did not find it funny, I thought it cliché. As a professional author and teacher, I am NOT in favor of the idea that "one should not hold back from any good ideas, regardless of how it impacts the current end result". If it negatively impacts the end result, it isn't a good ...


6

Your question is a bit all over the map but, ultimately, it's about tone. Your silly example would be fine for a first person narrator who loves puns and can never be completely serious. If it's the only time s/he ever said anything like that, it would be very out of place and jarring. If your example is a character's dialogue, then it depends on the ...


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