New answers tagged

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I have seen some books where the solution used was to add a "In <language> in the original" editor footnote for each of those instances. I wouldn't recommend that, though. There was a "distraction" factor for jumping from the story to the footnote, and it didn't seem worth, for a secondary character saying a few basic words in their ...


8

Your story must fulfill the promises it makes, or readers will not enjoy it Every book begins by creating expectations for the reader. The expectations start with the cover and title, and are built throughout the beginning of the book. If readers do not feel that the book satisfied their expectations, they will find it disappointing. To illustrate why your ...


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I don't think that I would be "angry", but I might well be annoyed. If I'm in the mood to read, say, an action/adventure story, and I pick up this book thinking it's going to be a lot of violence and action, and then after the first chapter it turns into a sweet and pleasant romance ... well, that's not what I wanted to read. Even if I like romance ...


9

Genre is a contract you make with the audience. If the genre is action/adventure, you're promising the audience that there will be an action sequence to resolve the plot. If its horror, you're promising that the ending will be terrifying. If it's romance, you're promising love. Comedy...laughs. If you change the genre partway through a story, you're breaking ...


1

I would expect "operando" (no "in") to be the correct form. My Latin is a bit rusty, and this technical use of operando is new to me, but we can break down the grammar. (Magistri, please correct any dubious details in the comments!) Operando is a gerund, i.e., a verbal noun, recognizable by its form. Gerunds often get translated into ...


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Give yourself inspiration. Now, I already gave an answer on the question "I can't write without an inspiration" that explained why you must give yourself inspiration. But I'll write it here. Now, of course I'm going to rewrite it, but this is what I mean by "Give youyrself inspiration": Many writers face writer's block (including me). A ...


-3

I personally am not into romance. I prefer horror over it. Others feel the same way; others feel the opposite. Some like both. As long as you do a smooth transition and it works well, you should be fine. Also, if you want more readers, I suggest keeping down the romance some. Women prefer romance over men a huge amount. Men prefer horror over women. Just ...


9

I think that without proper foreshadowing - even through the title or the cover - a story that changes genre in the middle will confuse, and probably anger most readers. If I was reading about the romantic conclusion of Charlie and Julia, and then suddenly a killer clown dropped through the window and killed Charlie, severely disfiguring Julia - I would ...


0

I feel drop hints, like when you write a scene imagine how both characters will act and make note of the difference between them. If for example a character switches part way then show a distinct difference based on their personalities. As you said Suoti is a gaming personality so I am assuming they are more of the teasing type I would say not have Niar/...


0

You could imply that some of her appearance changes; for example: "My name is Eben - who are you?" Inquired the older man. A mystic gloom surrounded Nair. Her smile was vicious, and her eyes became serious. "I am Suoti." You could also imply a change of scenery, like: The light dimmed, and a mystical aurora gleamed from Niar. "I'm ...


0

I'm writing a similar story, and I deal with it by giving the two personalities the same last name. When transitioning, it's always "Ms. Smith."


2

Write the switch-over, and then refer to the individual by the name of the active personality. That, or assign a group noun that all the personalities will respond to (e.g. if they treat each other as sisters, then the surname may be a common factor, "Miss Watevachezcauwd") If this is a Third Person narrative (either omniscient or limited but with ...


2

I would write... "My name is Eben - who are you?" inquired the old man. "I'm Suoti," the younger girl replied. You can dodge the question of identity by referring to the body's physical characteristics until it's apparent that the one body hosts multiple personalities.


0

First, you certainly have a level of competency that exceeds most native English speakers. If you want more training, consider copywriting. https://www.artofmanliness.com/articles/want-to-become-a-better-writer-copy-the-work-of-others/ Mine the writing of decades for the gems of prose. Chew on style and tone, digest it, make it part of you.


0

I think you should write in your voice. If you write/speak Australian, the spelling should reflect that. (Of course, if it is based in the US, you would not use Australian terminology foreign to the US.) By sticking to your native spelling you, a) identify yourself as having a specific origin. The reader will register this, but it will not detract from the ...


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Your question had been answered already. I just want to tell you that you focus on language that you and your targeted audience know. Let say you want to write American English, and you know not much about it, so will you continue with it? Let say you understand it very well what about your targeted audience? You look around your audience and consider them ...


2

Ray Bradbury recommended reading poetry. Every day. It does help.


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Paying attention to rhythm (i.e., caring about it) is the first step. After that, I recommend reading some instructional material on the subject. A book that has helped me greatly in many areas of writing (not just rhythm) is On Writing Well by William F. Zinsser. It is probably out of print, but if you can get hold of a copy, I highly recommend it. One ...


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Different self-publishing tools have different formatting software. So, it depends entirely on what tool you use and what size you want your finished book to be. If you are planning for your short book to be 8.5 x 11, then consider using a more standard font that you would use for another kind of document. However, if you are planning on having your ...


3

A lot of people mentioned this in the comments to your question, but the easiest answer to this question is to write in the style that your audience will understand it best. If you are writing for Americans, you should write it in American English. If you are writing for people who are reading British English, use British English. This includes yourself. ...


2

Write your book that feels natural for you, and the differences between American and British English is really trivial, like the use of the "u" in certain words. Just tell a really compelling story and your audience will forget that it's written in British English.


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