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20

It's not that it's always a bad thing - and to directly answer your question it can be appropriate to use it. Where it's bad is when it is over-used, specifically when the writer relies on it to place the emphasis they "hear" on the words but without actually conveying the particulars of that emphasis to the reader. Imagine you're trying to show a ...


8

Item #1: Words are just tools First, writing is ultimately about conveying something. If your words convey to the reader what you want them to, they're good by definition. It's just a question of: is there a better way to get your message across? If not... then keep it how you have it! Item #2: You're relying on a (possibly inaccurate) proxy. You're ...


4

I would say for me, my style would be a hard no, but I use italicized letters to denote a shift in my two narrators. Italicized letters are the thoughts of the main character while reflecting on events that they would be aware of at that moment. For me, I do capitilizations of non-proper nouns I wish emphasize, and even then I try not to do it in dialog. ...


4

I think this is perfectly fine, just so long as you aren't abusing it. I myself don't do this much anymore, but that's less because of me thinking it's bad and more because of me writing on a platform that doesn't support italics. There are also plenty of published books out there that use italics for emphasis, although I can't remember them at the moment. I ...


4

While its certainly easy to overuse both italization and bolding, if you take extra care to use it quite sparingly and certainly NOT multiple times with a sentence it can be ok. Oh, right that also applies to all caps which is bad vs While its certainly easy to overuse both italization and bolding, if you take extra care to use it quite sparingly and ...


4

I'd recommend trying to switch narration style - it will give your book a better "immersion" in character's POV. Your British (half-British, but Britain-raised, I assume?) character would view America through the prism of her British experience, it would only be natural for her to think to herself like: "There's about a litre of water in this ...


3

These days, this is probably acceptable. But is it effective? Not for me. What value do you think it adds? And how does this relate to you and your personal essay? If this is a lead-in to something that actually relates to you, then I would focus it and make it tighter.


3

Simplicity is better It is inherently better to write in the simplest possible manner required to communicate your ideas. As someone who reads a lot of older prose (I recently finished McCauley's History of England), I'm definitely aware of the differences you tend to see in older works. The most extreme example I can recall was some years ago as I ...


3

Although this is an older post, I thought I'd add information in case others are still looking for answers to this question. I work as an editor on different journals published by different publishers, and the answer varies according to house style, often based on which style manual they prefer, but house style may also vary from the preferred style manual. ...


3

According to the APA style guide, "A subtitle should be separated using a colon or em dash (i.e., — and not the shorter - en dash) and then a single space (i.e., Title: Subtitle OR Title — Subtitle)." Personally, I find the Oxford Style Guide recommendation of an en-dash far more aesthetically pleasing.


2

Practice pastiches. Pick examples of the style you want to emulate, and then write something like that. For instance, take a newspaper article about the opening of a library and write something in its style about the opening of an imaginary school. Pick a blog entry about visiting parents for the Fourth of July and write one like it about visiting ...


2

How will knowing the technical labels for different modes of achieving rhythm in prose help you to accomplish it in practice? Rhythm comes, technically, from things like phrase length, stress groups, and so on, but I find the process of actually perceiving and/or generating rhythm is much more intuitive. Observing poetry and music is also excellent practice, ...


2

Let me tell you what happened from someone who's tried it. I was once writing a series with the intent to make it seem like an abridged series but in written form. The characters were in a stereotypical fantasy plot but snarked at each other and poked fun at the (intentionally constructed) plot holes in their setting. They would make stupid banter with the ...


2

There is nothing wrong per-se in using italics for emphasis, though relying on it is thin ice. Here's a suggestion: Use whatever you like in your draft, then when editing take it as a prompt to try to paint the picture of the conversation in more detail so the reader is in the same mindset as you. Draft: "I will never let you..." Edit: John ...


2

I find italics to be quite helpful in both emphases on words in dialogue, and internal dialogue. I second the others that you just need to be aware of how much you're using it - don't want it to lose meaning, right? Same goes for internal dialogue. Like, if you have a paragraph of thought, and it's all in italics, that's hard to read sometimes. Overall, ...


1

Publishers sometimes have a standard and recommendations on how to write an article for them, as freelance writers submit articles and need to know in what style to write for them. As there are a myriad of possible styles, I recommend searching for them yourself, (rather than me providing a bunch of links). This is especially true for news articles, academic ...


1

Depends on your definition of "serious." If you mean will people be engaged with the plot and have emotional reactions to the characters, that's a bit difficult to say. It really depends on what conflict you're creating to layer over the source material's narrative and how you write the characters. If you're going for the feel of the web-video ...


1

I can't speak to the grading standards of your target college, but I'd assume it's acceptable as a creative choice. If you happen to have any kind of college advisor with your current school, I'd definitely consult them before submitting, just in case. Good luck on your application!


1

Your character thinks and speaks in British English, go with that. Use the idioms the character knows and would use, otherwise it will seem hollow. If you have a third person omniscient point of view, you could play with the different spellings to show an American character as opposed to your MC. Do what is natural for your MC and relax into that. Let it ...


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