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9

The sentence as written has suspicious modify walked in an attributive fashion—somewhat unusually, since it's being used (syntactically) adverbially rather than adjectivally. Suspicious, unlike the actual adverb suspiciously, is a noun, but, in this syntax, it's still modifying the nature of how Marlon is walking. (Even though it shouldn't be. Any ...


6

Show, don't tell. I get that it sounds trite and unhelpful given how common the advice is, but in this case it's true. The way you get such a message across is to show it in the context of your narrative rather than having one or more characters act as mouthpieces. Show a male character who is a father and show that they can be as nurturing and loving to ...


3

It honestly doesn't matter, as long as you keep all the "multiple-choice"/"multiple choice" and "multiple-response"/"multiple response" consitistant. I have seen both being used with or without hyphens on tests and these really no difference. As long as each one is consistant with itself, there is no issue. That being said, I would probably use "multiple ...


3

There is no best way, at least not a best way for all possible readers. Trying to be excellent for the broadest selection of readers is an impossible task. So don't go down that path. I do not know anything about anime, but I assume that, like other subjects, there are subsets of the topic. I assume that that audiences can be divided based upon their ...


3

It wouldn't make it unique. Now that self-publishing has really taken off, people get really wild with POVs... The main risk is that of confusing your reader. If your reader thinks you don't know how POVs work, or they can't tell whose POV they're in, they might just quit the novel. I can't remember the name of it, but I was listening to an epic fantasy ...


2

On the one hand, this will depend on which usage of "first" you are employing. On the other hand, you have provided us with an example sentence. Initially, you could say "to start with", or "to begin". Working from the assumption that you are listing steps in a process or algorithm, you can commence by deciding if it is even necessary to use full ...


2

'On Writing Well' by William Zinsser has some good advice about improving your writing. 'Elements of Style' is dated but has some good ideas. (I picked up a second-hand copy for a couple of pounds.) However, you might find it more useful to use digital tools to check your work. Look at the recommendations they make and see if you agree. You could try ...


2

It's not clear from the question if you've literally used quotation marks and a hyphen or not. You should not use both. Stylistically, it's more common than not to use a hyphen. But some people choose to use quotation marks instead, especially if there are many words being used adjectivally: It was a once-in-a-lifetime moment. It was a "once in a ...


1

According to the Chicago Manual of Style (You should check your own style guide), hyphens help to improve readability when you're using adjective phrases. In general, you'd hyphenate a phrase like "multiple response" when it appears before the word it modifies, but not afterward. So: "multiple-response questions" and "questions that are multiple response." ...


1

Forgive the vulgarity, but perhaps the "blank-ass blank" test may be helpful: If someone told you they bought a "big ass car" (intentionally unhyphenated), and you aren't sure what the person means, you have two choices: Did they buy an "ass car" that's big? or Did they buy a "car" that's "big-ass"? Obviously, the adjectival phrase in the second ...


1

Adding to the good suggestions mentioned before. Consider regularly referring to style guide. Microsoft style guide for technical writing is good for formal writing. It has a lot of guidance on cutting out fluff and writing in action-oriented sentences, framed in active voice, and in shorter sentences from readability perspective. As suggested before, the ...


1

Aie, so, contra-intuitively, I found a way to remove that little space. I am still left wondering how it landed up in there. In any case, to solve this, or add stuffs in there, go to the view tab, then select print layout and draft, then in the reference tab, make sure the show notes is on, then in the dropdown list, select footnote separator. I found the ...


1

I posted a comment an answer commented on, so I decided to post an answer... My answer concerns novels, for technical writing most don't care about style and even legibility if you are an expert in your field A side note for the OP, you also asked about bilingual play of words and linguistic puns...it is a bad idea and most likely would require your ...


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