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I recommend not asking rhetorical questions like this at all. You already know the answer, so asking runs the risk of reminding the listener/viewer that this is not a spontaneous conversation between friends, but is in fact a planned lecture. This is especially true of phrasing like "tell me" which they cannot do because they are watching a pre-...


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Unless the particular combination of bank notes is some how important to the story, you'd just write "she stole 328000 won from the till." You normally wouldn't even be that exact about it: "she stole over three hundred thousand won."


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Oxford's style guide tells that: “In non-technical contexts, Oxford style is to use words for numbers below 100.” (New Hart's Rules, 2nd, ed., p. 186) Although the style guide explains that there are exceptions to the rule, in your case, you have to use words rather than figures for six, two, and eight. Things are different for 1,000, 10,000, and 50,000. As ...


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Codeless Code Case 196 has some very pithy and wise advice on this subject. “You speak to your peers as if they were empty registers waiting to be filled with the bits of your wisdom. Ours may be a dry digital world, but it is built atop wetware, which is squishy and irrational and prone to overheating. You cannot flip a brain from zero to one simply by ...


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'We' is a better choice. 'You' places you on a teaching pedestal, with the watchers being placed at a distance. It is almost as if you want to remind them of their ignorance: they don't know the answer while you do. 'I' is narcissistic. You already know the answer, why would you ask yourself such a trivial question when making a video to help someone else? '...


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