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0

A thought. None of these rules are in stone. Generally, they're great to follow and won't let you down but now and then BOOM..."It has the Reaction of the POVC, but the Dilemma and Decision of another, non-POV character." If it can be done, for instance, you're writing in the subjective third person, you could go into another POV and give that character his/...


1

Can it be effective instead to move the Inciting incident to the very beginning? No. Obviously that is my opinion, and you may find some decent writing that has done that; good writers have broken just about every rule in writing. So instead of "rules" maybe we call them "guidelines" and common characteristics of what we usually see in best selling writing....


6

You can definitely start a three-act story with an in media res opening. A story having three acts is more about the number of plot points and their location. Here's a good primer on the three-act structure. However, should you start a story with an in media res opening? You'd be surprised how fast you get from the first word to the inciting event (that ...


1

This may sound wishy-washy but it comes from having my own understanding of poetry continue to grow over the years. I think if the writer intends what they are writing to be a poem, and lacking any strong evidence that it is something else (like a script), then it can probably be considered a poem. There are prose poems and many styles (including ones ...


7

To add a bullet point to Liquid's excellent list: Creating an appendix permanently locks your worldbuilding As long as your worldbuilding only exists in your mind and your notes, you are free to change and adjust it however much you need to. As soon as you publish it it becomes locked in stone, and altering it will come with costs in reader confusion and ...


2

I have a technique I call the "Scruffy Nerf Herder Test". If I'm using something totally not real, I need to make sure that the context in the dialog makes the meaning of the word perfectly clear. The name of course comes from the dialog between Princess Leia and Han Solo in Star Wars where Leia hurls the line "Why you stuck up, half-witted, scruffy ...


4

An appendix such as a glossary, a geographic map, or a timeline is especially helpful when you have a collection of work in the same world. In the ideal, it is a quick way for a reader to see the relationship between works. Although each of your works can stand alone, it may be helpful for an avid follower of your world to know how things fit together. If ...


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My question is, for the sake of satisfying reader interest, would it be worthwhile writing an appendix summarising certain inessential worldbuilding entities that's entirely optional for a reader to peruse? It can be worthwhile. Some readers are "hungry" after a story ends, and will devour any appendix you provide. It can be argued that since you have that ...


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A simple answer for a simple question. Yes, at the end. That's how mysteries work. Edit: I'll elaborate. Mystery, as a genre, revolves around building suspense around an unknown factor, and the plot is about uncovering said unknown factor through ingenuity/conflict. Resolving the mystery is paramount to the payoff. I thought this was self-explanatory, but ...


4

Have you tried TV Tropes? It is a wiki which describes story "tropes" (i.e. the various narrative elements, tricks and occasional fails of the storytelling art). It is vast and has a loose but fairly well defined structure; tropes are organised by category and are extensively hyperlinked. Works, creators and genres are also given, with lots of links ...


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You are asking if there is a database where scholars are turning art, which is subjective in it's very nature, into a science. You do realize what you're asking is probably in some back corner of the net, if at all. As libli had said, there are furious debate on many different works of art, and especially writing, because it can be as complicated or as ...


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