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0

Write. Write like nobody is watching. Write the story you want. Write for yourself. Write like nobody will ever read it And Read. Read a lot and widely. Reread what you have written. And rewrite what you don't like. Get honest feedback from honest people, people who read a lot and with a decent sense of artistic appreciation.


7

I will disagree with everyone! The best way to improve as a writer is to analyze how writers you really like, of books you really like, accomplished what they did. Don't just read them, that quickly descends into story immersion and entertainment, you aren't really learning anything. You have to read analytically, you need to pick apart those conversations ...


5

I had this same dilemma recently. I've been writing for over twenty years, sometimes professionally, and I have some areas in writing I really excel at. But I also have some big weaknesses, and those weren't getting any better. I don't have the availability to enroll in an MFA program, and I'm not big on online courses. So what to do? Instead I checked ...


8

Other answers have already covered rather well the benefits you can get from both writing and reading so I won't rehash those but rather to add another - get feedback. Join a local writers group or an online one where you can get regular feedback from others on your work. If you keep writing the same way over and over without this all you'll do is keep ...


6

The best way to improve as a writer is to write. Just write. Then write some more. Then look at what you've written critically, ask others to read and comment, then rewrite and write some more. Courses are a systematised way of doing the above. If having someone tell you "write!" helps you, go ahead. But you have to understand that at the core of them all ...


11

Reading! Read for pleasure, and in the field you want to write in. Sometimes, read strategically, analyzing a paragraph/sentence/section you really like or dislike. Sometimes, try to paraphrase an interesting section several times, to observe what different choices might have led to. (The textbook I got this from, Writing Analytically, suggested doing ...


18

The first thing that comes to mind is probably something you've heard a thousand times already: PRACTICE. Pretty self-explanatory. Try to write something every day, be it a sentence or a short story, anything goes. Your practice time is a good time to experiment with things like figurative language or sentence structure, master concepts like dialogue ...


4

Writing to friends and family, you can dispose with formality. You don't need a "structure". "Stream of consciousness" is how such letters were written before computers, before you could rearrange what you have already written. That's how informal letters are written still. I would start a letter with asking about the other person - that's just being polite....


2

Finish what you start. Your instincts are correct. The more weight you give an element, any element, the more readers are going to understand it as something that will be important later on. But, that doesn't necessarily mean that if an element is important, then you're required to build a whole subplot around it and keep bringing it up again and again! ...


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