9

The sentence as written has suspicious modify walked in an attributive fashion—somewhat unusually, since it's being used (syntactically) adverbially rather than adjectivally. Suspicious, unlike the actual adverb suspiciously, is a noun, but, in this syntax, it's still modifying the nature of how Marlon is walking. (Even though it shouldn't be. Any ...


9

The question is, how much of the story turns on the fact that the protagonist is an android. Perhaps, a human detective would not have thrived or even survived. Also, how important is his(?) identity in the legal, economic, social, and religious contexts. From what you wrote, I could envision several different stories. In one, the underlying story is ...


3

To answer your questions quickly; Not sure if there's a certain term, it's perfectly fine, if you want a complicated series then yes, depends on what you want. In more detail; Not sure if there's a certain term or something for this type of writing but it's what I do and it's been fine so far. Maybe spontaneous writing? Improvised writing? I certainly don't ...


3

The answer to your question depends heavily on how you learn. There are hundreds of books on how to write fiction. Podcasts, blogs, and YouTube videos round out the resources. As a retired engineer, I like lots of structure and, thus, focus on outlining, planning, and world building. Others, and from the contents of your question you might be one of them, ...


3

There are a number of different frameworks for writing stories. You'll have to try as many as you can to find what works for you. This is but one method. Yes, but / No, and Any time your characters try to overcome a problem, it will have one of two outcomes: "Yes they succeed, but a complication arises", or "No they don't succeed, and the consequences ...


2

It's targetted at people who won't read the thing. Given that you read the thing, you aren't its target audience, so all it needs to do for you is stay out of the way, which putting it at the end does (whereas putting it at the start might lead to you not reading the thing when you otherwise would do, which is a negative for the author). The target is ...


2

Look for the difference between pantser and plotter, it should teach you a lot. Is this a method others use? Yes! As I understand it, you are a pantser. You're basically planting seeds and watching them grow into a beautiful story. Some planning won't hurt your writing, but since it's your first attempt I wouldn't recommend it yet. Changing your habits ...


2

A collection of episodic stories is not a novel, nor should you try to make it into one. Publishing these as individual stories is definitely the right way to go. The short story market can be easier to break into as an unknown, and it's a good way to build a fan base and a resume. In addition, Fantasy and Science Fiction is one of the healthier short story ...


2

Would it be better to have her meeting the guys in a flashback? Yes. Or if it's possible, mention the meeting in at most two or three sentences. All stories revolve around events in a character's life. And while a character may have experienced many life-shaping firsts - the first meeting with a vampire, the first kiss, the first Tae-Kwon-Do lesson - not ...


2

As JonStonecash noted, this depends on the kind of story you want to build. I would consider that it is appropriate to reveal this at the beginning of the first chapter. I expect you wanted to write a story about an android detective, and you want your readers to know he is an android. This is the kind of thing that would be shown in the backcover: "Our ...


2

You want the drama to build. And the bigger a reveal, the more dramatic it is, so they should be withheld for later. However, there is the question of whether this is as big a reveal as this reader thinks. You mention that only one of the group said that. Did the others say nothing? You might explicitly ask them if you have doubts, but if only one of a ...


2

It's up to you, but I would say yes, it is a plot distraction. Personally, that would throw me off. I would be asking, "Could the dogs have significance? Should I remember them? When really I should be focused on the actual story. But, like Alexander pointed out in a comment, it kind of depends on the rules of your science fiction world. If talking ...


2

I'd advise you to proceed with caution. First, how likely is your audience to recognize the cameo or easter egg? If you expect the audience of the two works to overlap almost completely, then this might be fine. They'll either read your current story first and get a kick out of recognizing the character (although they might still expect her to play a bigger ...


1

Short answer; probably should be okay Slightly longer answer; ask betas if unsure Long answer; If you already have several red herrings in your book, then this is a gamble. Maybe the reader will just nudge it aside as meaning nothing or maybe chase down every possible vague reference to them to try and figure out what they mean. It sounds like this would be ...


1

A few Ideas: This is slightly borderline asking what to write, but I'll assume you want broad strokes. A choice: believe there is no God or higher power (abandoning a lifetime of faith) or embracing that the real answers aren't found in physics. Eventually, there would be a realization that physics is a window into the creative process of God, bringing ...


1

I would probably use the time for the characters to talk about your character narrating the story. This gives the reader time to prepare for bigger narration. You can also try and mention this earlier on, which tells the reader that this large narration within a narration is coming. Another method might also be your character doing preparatory things, such ...


1

Either works, but I think what you might be going for is: Graphic designer and inaugural graduate in 2019 of the Honours Bachelor of Graphic Design program from Harvard University. or perhaps Graphic designer and inaugural graduate (2019) of the Honours Bachelor of Graphic Design program from Harvard University.


1

Scenes should break when the action is done so that we do not have the dull interconnection between two dynamic pieces of actions that move the story forward. Chapters should be a unit of story. This can be one scene, this can be many scenes. The important thing is it forms a complete part of the story. Mastering the art of breaking takes a lot of practice ...


1

What I think you are asking about are chapter breaks (or scene breaks) and how to use them. Chapter breaks are gaps in the middle of a chapter that are used, broadly speaking, to gloss over any unnecessary parts of your story. Mind you, that doesn't just cover the everyday details of being human that nobody wants to read about. What is unnecessary to a story ...


1

Yes, it is still a dependent clause. Nothing has transformed its structure.


1

Overuse of any technique is undesirable, whether it's alliteration, personification, exaggeration or whatever. Overuse of short sentences or long sentences or compound ones or complex ones is unwanted. Questions can be very useful. You can pose the question the readers themselves have. You can plant ideas and create ownership of those ideas. However, if the ...


1

These blocks of text that highlight additional or important information are called admonitions in writing. A good readup is presented here. Hope this helps.


1

Short chapters in the literary world are like bite-sized snacks in the world of food. They are less intimidating and easier to digest, and they can be surprisingly addicting, because you finish one and want to immediately go on to the next one. They also provide an author the opportunity for rapid changes of mood, setting and viewpoint. They've become ...


1

Personally, it's easiest to understand as a reader when the conflict grows from the very beginning. Each chapter should give a little teaser, but get gradually worse. This is the way my favorite authors do it, and now I write this way!


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