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I disagree with what's comment. There are certain techniques used in these speeches that help convey meaning. I'm going to use Martin Luther King's I had a dream speech in my answer. What kinds of techniques are used which make a speech powerful? If you look at a few of these speeches you can see a few common literary techniques or devices that are used. ...


6

I would begin with a story, about somebody you are memorializing. I'd expect it to be tragic, obviously, but the point of the memorial is to remember what was taken from so many. To prevent that from being a faceless crowd, we do what writers do: Focus on an individual. Photojournalists do the same: I'll never forget this photo. (NSFW, naked napalm girl). ...


4

Congratulations on being asked to give this speech! Not everyone gets to welcome a graduation ceremony. I'll try to help by giving you a general structure that you can use when you write it. Start by thanking everyone for attending and for spending their time honoring the seniors who worked hard to get to the point they're at now. Then comes your success ...


3

When I taught Presentations in Tech Writing, one of my biggest tools was "ROPES" - review/rapport, overview/objective, present, exercise, summary. In more social settings, you're using the comedy opening to establish rapport with the audience. Here, you want to instead connect with them by explaining your connection to the memorialized people and to ...


2

To answer that, you've got to learn to read like a writer. (Or, in this case, like an orator.) You can study these speeches that impress you to find the answer to that question and to improve your own speeches. Don't just listen to them and be impressed, but analyse them. Take them apart. What are the orators saying? How are they saying it? How can you do ...


1

I wrote this before the poster indicated that this was a speech. My advice still applies, it just needs to be on a shorter timeline. Write what you want, show it to people you trust, revise, then show (or read) it to a more diverse group of listeners, especially those similar to your expected audience. I'd say your question applies to every word you ...


1

"I am a roll of toilet paper on the inside third." I honestly have no idea what this means. If it was in context, I would hazard to make a guess. If it was still cryptic in context, I would probably assume it is a colloquialism, some sort of military jargon, or an inside joke. As a reader, I wouldn't lose sleep over it. I would probably expect this ...


1

Hi Gunny and it's nice to meet you. Standard exercises--I'd suggest a couple. Join a writing group that shares excerpts. Share your excerpts. You can ask for feedback specifically on your metaphors, if you like, asking what the group thought. Find a list (or other resource) of metaphors such as those linked to here. Read a metaphor, decide what you think ...


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