52

There is no real grammatical rule for this and the very fact that you are using emoji shows that grammar probably isn't very important. That being said, from what I see on social media, most people use emojis sort of like punctuation, not text, putting it at the end of a sentence instead of a period/exclamation point. Example: Today was a great day 😀 I ...


34

I have an insight that might or not help you : I once had the very same question, but for my native language: French. I sent a mail to the "Académie française", which is the french official language institute. After some days I got a very pedantic response telling me that I should not use emojis in any sentence as they were a display of my lack of ability ...


28

It isn't science fiction, it is just Contemporary fiction, aka Realistic fiction. A Science Fiction story must rely heavily on some non-existing tech or some reasonably plausible guess at a futuristic development; like being visited by aliens, or discovering them. In some scenarios (about the future, or space operas, etc) there is a lot of this; in others ...


15

In general, to convey poetic line breaks in "continuous text", replace the line break with a slash. "I've never seen a purple cow./I never hope to see one./But I can tell you anyhow,/I'd rather see than be one." I don't use Twitter so I can't say if this convention is commonly used there, but it's the normal convention in other contexts.


15

Social media is no longer sci-fi In years gone past concepts like the internet would be considered sci-fi. Many book exist which use digital communication on a global scale as part of a sci-fi setting. Oxford Living Dictionary defines science fiction as: fiction based on imagined future scientific or technological advances and major social or environmental ...


15

Emoji is new and I believe there haven't any grammar rules related to emojis. You can put it before, after, or even as a full-stop. If you ask me, I prefer to put it as a substitute of punctuation marks. However, I sometimes put it before punctuation marks, indicating that the emoji is still part of the sentence (describing that sentence). Example: I didn't ...


14

A sentence is made up of words, hence Emoji should have no place in them. Putting them after a full stop is the most sensible option. Writing out a sentence, then inserting an Emoji, then the full stop interferes with grammar rules, there will be an ugly space between the last word and the full stop. An Emoji at the end of a sentence should not be seen as ...


10

At a bare minimum, you need a central landing place to direct people to in your marketing. The important items you want to cover are: Title and brief description (genre, audience) of your book. Your name. Where to buy it. This can be for just your book/series or for all your works. If you only have one work now, you can set it up for that and decided ...


6

If you aren't yet published with an established fan base: post everything you feel comfortable with publishing Your goal should be to build up a fan base so that people know your name and know what you are working on. That way you can build up a reputation while working on the finished product and at the same time get a lot of feedback. How useful that ...


6

If what you seek is a measure of anonymity, but not to actually hide who you are, you can use your first name and initial. You can be Lois L. or Clark K. Even if your name is highly unique, it is very unlikely you will be recognised by your first name alone. But when you do want to be recognised, you're right there. No trouble introducing yourself. Another ...


5

User interaction is a commitment. Moderation, as Galastel discusses, is one important component of it (use software such as Wordpress that emails you all new comments and allows you to set moderation parameters). Remember, your website is your private domain and you do not have to allow "free speech" (this has no meaning in private forums). On my personal ...


5

If your website allows interaction - leaving comments etc., there is the hidden implication that someone on your behalf keeps an eye on those interaction, at least to the extent of keeping things civil, if not to the extent of answering questions like "when is the next book coming out" and "why did you write X instead of Y). If somebody is called a moron in ...


5

I would suggest using a non-descriptive social site, which may work as stand in for the top social networks as needed. Anyway, on your question... On using real tweets The author of the messages is the author of the messages and has all the rights any other author would have (unless they took them from somewhere else, in which case they are not the ...


5

Why not just give yourself an alternate identity altogether? You can go register a DBA (Doing Business As, also called an "Assumed Name"), it becomes a legal name you can use, you can have separate email, web page, FB page, whatever. Google "filing a DBA in [state]". It would probably cost you less than $50, if you go directly to your Secretary of State ...


4

I eagerly await the answers to your question. There are several levels of information to include. You'll want to include the meat of what you are creating: Through IRL groups and feedback, I've been asked to include character sketches, maps, short stories, and real science that forms the basis of the story. You'll want to include a real person 'persona': ...


4

If you hold down the Shift key and press Enter it adds a line break. Apparently it won't work in some clients, but I just tried it on a tweet and it seems to work.


4

The biggest limitation of most modern chatbots is only replying to the last message stated. They can give great responses, that seem funny or clever, but only to the last sentence said. So when you write your AI don't look at the conversation as a whole. Look at the last sentence ignoring the conversation and reply to just that. Also don't forget that your ...


4

Inspired by MattOnyx who found the answer for the French language I decided to look at advice for the Dutch language. Luckily the answer was easy to find: the "Nederlandse Taalunie" (Dutch language union) who develops and stimulates the policies for the Dutch language has a website called "taaladvies" (language advice). Here you can find the following ...


3

If it's present day, we're still a long way from anything that would pass a Turing Test, so ANNIE is likely to be defined as much by mistakes and overly generic answers as by anything that would normally be recognised as a character - something more like Siri/Alexa/Cortana than Scarlett Johansson. If ANNIE is commercially backed, you could also work in ...


3

I wouldn't really consider a story science fiction if the science and technology in the story exists entirely within the confines of reality today. For it to count, some aspect of the technology in the story would need to be more advanced or significantly different compared to what currently exists today. Tom Scott actually has a lot of videos outlining sci-...


3

As someone who used emoticons and kaomoji before emoji became widely used, I tend to put emojis where I would put an emoticon or kaomoji. For me, that tends to be either after punctuation or in place of punctuation, and I've seen many people who did/do the same :D But I've also seen many people who put an emoticon or text face before punctuation. ^^; I ...


2

As someone who also writes on a variety of topics, I can tell you unequivocally --it's a nightmare for "brand identity." Readers want to be able to come to you with consistent expectations. DEFINITELY get one pseudonym/platform for your adult work, AND a different one for your family-oriented work. Those are two entirely separate niches with no expected ...


2

You might want to consider using a pseudonym for either the adult content ones or the children’s ones. You are trying to establish a brand. People expect a certain consistency in an author’s works. You have two very different niches and it might be worthwhile to set up a separate site for one or the other. Established authors who venture into a different ...


2

It varies. Some publishers really require you to be "social". Some don't. But having social presence helps. It attracts a specific audience that may or may not be reachable through traditional means. It also garners feedback that usually is absent in traditional one-way communication. But for certain categories, not being "social" kills sales. It doesn't ...


2

Here are some of the qualities I came up with: Flow. The two words have to flow together smoothly. Brangelina is an easy combination of Brad and Angelina. It helps when the two words share letters or sounds. Syllables. Swapping out the same number of syllables keeps the rhythm of the original word. This is why Snowmageddon works. Snowpocalypse has the same ...


2

I have no experience but here's what I came up with: 1: make it flow. In your examples above, Brangelina and Snowmageddon both flow much better than BeyonZ. Make it catchy. Snowmageddon is very catchy. So is Bennifer. Blizzard2016 isn't catchy. Make it relevant. Calling a snowstorm Jones had no relevancy towards the subject. Keep it short. If someone ...


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