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Preface: What the Snowflake method [SFM] doesn't provide. I have added this after my main post, to make this explicit. In SFM Step 3, you decide upon your main characters motivation, goal, conflict, and epiphany. You provide a one-sentence story line. Clearly these notes do not determine your character's personality, if they are good or bad, if they are ...


6

You pick one version and test it. A test says more than a thousand theories, so just keep going. The Snowflake Method is an iterative method where you're allowed/encouraged to go back and "fix" things after each step. You're even encouraged to go back and adjust the Snowflake after you've written about halfway into the actual first draft. Pick the one ...


5

According to the linked website you provided, the points are pretty self-explanatory. Copy-pasting from the site: The character’s name A one-sentence summary of the character’s storyline The character’s motivation (what does he/she want abstractly?) The character’s goal (what does he/she want concretely?) The character’s conflict (what prevents him/her from ...


5

I never used the snowflake method myself, even if I gave it a look sometime ago. The problem with your abstract and concrete goals is that one is the specialization of the other. After all "killing X because it did Y" is just a particular instance of "vengeance". So they are basically the same goal. Another problem with this is that the abstract goal ...


3

Since we lack a snowflake expert on writing.se, I went to the source and bought the book. That book is an experience, one which I don't want to regurgitate in full here, so to elucidate the material on the published article here's what the step 3 paragraph summary is asking for (and the elements you should figure out prior to writing it). Step 3) The ...


3

It appears that while there are echoing themes in both plots, they are still unrelated with the exception of a common deity. In that sense all stories set in a world of Christianity have something in common. The traditional relationship between a plot and subplot is usually more intertwined: detective John Doe is searching for a serial killer, finds him and ...


2

I adore the snowflake method and don't see any reason you can't use it to write your story. First point - What is dual plot? I'm not sure there is such a thing as 'dual plot'. The plot is the main storyline - where the key character starts, the trials they go through, and the resolution. It's common for stories to have more than one of these, often applying ...


2

I have never heard the term "dual novel" before (do you mean a novel with a dual timeline?) I'm currently using the Snowflake method to outline several books in a series, so perhaps I can be of help! I'm making one "snowflake" per book, but when characters are reappearing, I can reuse steps that deal with their backstory, psychology and the like. The key ...


2

I don't know anything about any software, so this will focus on the Snowflake Method part of the question. This site is my favorite description of the Snowflake Method. Here's what it says on step three: For each of your major characters, take an hour and write a one-page summary sheet that tells: The character’s name A one-sentence summary of ...


2

There is no rule, set in stone, that a novel must have a single coherent plot; nor any law that demands that one thread be "the plot" and another only "the subplot". Indeed, there is something to be said for an artist taking conventions and breaking them quite deliberately. That said having two plots, either side-by-side or one-after-the-other, already has ...


2

I think an abstract goal needs to be more useful as a life philosophy than you can make "vengeance." If that is my life goal, what do I do on idle Sundays, ask neighbors if I can take some vengeance on their behalf? I'd come up with an abstract goal of a hero that allows them to do good for others even if there is no vengeance that needs taking. Something ...


1

The example you give in your question is all about age and gender. And age is the one category you need to be mindful of while you write. Most people know in advance the age group they are writing for, others narrow it down as they write. Now, the example is about older adults vs younger adults vs kids. In terms of labeling your writing, the important ...


1

I haven't read the Snowflake Method in-depth, but my intuition is that your concrete goal is too abstract it you haven't figured out the justification yet. Why does this character specifically care so much about this specific act? Why would they continue to focus on revenge for this act for an extended period of time? If they found out that the perpetrator ...


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