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1

It's not always necessary to match the weather and general atmosphere to the mood of your main characters. In many books, scenes where the character is upset often are bright and sunny. The contrast effect gives you a lot of opportunities to talk about your character's feelings. And it's also not wrong to have gloomy weather during sad scenes. Just make sure ...


8

The secret behind this is that we never perceive things neutrally, but always through the lens of our mood, our experiences, and our emotions. Coloring the descriptions can be powerful way to put the reader in the head of the POV character, and to make a more immersive experience. With that said, your moods aren't actually affecting the weather unless you're ...


3

This technique can feel cliché when it's used clumsily for effect rather than fitting the story. In a solid, working story, everything should fit together seamlessly, the story, the characters, the setting, the dialogue, almost as if the reader is watching you piece together a puzzle right in front of their eyes and when they see the final picture, ...


1

Just don't. The weather (or other elements of the setting) can have an effect on the characters, but the character's mood has no effect on the weather. A gray, overcast day might pull your character's mood down but the depression your character feels can't make clouds appear. Look at real life, for Pete's sake. Funerals happen on bright, sunny days and ...


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