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Bottom up. Don't try and write the whole world into one story. Write it as many stories. Zoom in on a small part of the world. One or two conflicts and a dozen or so characters. Decide what that story is about. Only explore the world insofar as it benefits that story (Don't worry, not mentioning something doesn't stop it existing.) Then zoom in on another ...


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How much of that belongs in the same story? If you've had a bunch of neat ideas, they don't necessarily all belong together. One of my favourite authors, Charles Stross, has had two major series running at the same time (one a take on the old "parallel worlds" thing, and another a grimdark Lovecraftian magic/spy series), plus a future-humans ...


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Write the First one, then see if it's really a problem: Before you start to panic, I'd actually sit down and start writing. As you do, figure out what the central theme of the story is, then ruthlessly eliminate everything that doesn't support that. If it's not completely critical to the plot, cut it. That's just good focus. Now see if the material REALLY ...


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First in, Last out A good rule of thumb is to resolve your major conflicts in reverse order that they are introduced. For example, if your story starts with a dragon attack, and while dealing with that you protagonist has a fight with their partner, then you should resolve the relationship issue before slaying the dragon. Your ongoing conflicts provide a ...


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There is no good way to do that. Did you have a long arc on the series? It may still be too long to put it into one book. And if you did that would be a very very long book most publishers would not buy. What you need to do is start over using all your ideas piled on the side so you can select some to use. Write your premise then do a log line. Write an ...


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Generally there are some recurring numbers. Trinities are pretty common and tend to follow an Id, Ego, and Superego personifications in the characters (Instinct/Emotions, Middle Ground, and Logic/Rationalism). Generall examples of these trinity are "Bones, Kirk, Spok" or "Ron, Harry, Hermonie". You'll note the "leader" tends ...


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Let's start with a little exercise: take a minute, and write down the names of as many Hogwarts students from the Harry Potter series as you can (main timeline only, so no putting down all of the magical adult characters, and none of the kids from the epilogue). Done that? I imagine you've got somewhere between 4 and 20? Would it surprise you to hear that ...


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Possibly you might mention various minor characters, such as other students, teachers, the principal, school janitors, the parents of the kids who are the main characters, etc. only when they do something that the main chracters notice briefly. For example, the teacher asks a question and the smartest kid in the class answers, but incorrectly for once, and ...


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Class mates are no different from any other kind of side character like (to go with your family example) the grandparents who sometimes visit, the grumpy neighbour, the big brother's girl friend etc. In the context of class mates, first you need to determine the size of the class. However, if there are 20 pupils in the class, that doesn't mean you need to ...


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Au contraire! The Big Bang Theory will show you exactly how to do it. There are 4 main characters, and 4 others that are matched with those first 4; so those are regulars but not the MCs. Although by the end they do look like 8 MCs. There are some regular characters eg. parents and folks the MCs work with. And there are some special characters that show up ...


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All three of these answers completely missed the question IMO. The only thing I found helpful here is the mention of Terry Pratchett using 'A Discworld Novel' for standalone novels in the same world. The only thing I can suggest is using that, so for example, 'A Petra Novel' for standalones, but the question was about multiple series so, 'A Petra Collective ...


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Publish or Paralysis: I am finding I have a similar problem. In my case, the second book is intended to be in the same series. Only how do I muster the will to write a sequel when I haven't gotten the first approved? Getting that first book written is a Herculean task. You are completely devoting yourself to achieving a grand task you always doubted you ...


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