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0

The best way to phrase this is either: that took place in 2019 and 2020, of: that took place from 2019 to 2020.


1

Just from a 'craft' perspective, the difficulty I have with this sentence is that it uses too many adjectives and some unconventional word choices, and that makes it difficult to visualize what's actually happening. For instance: The meticulously placed masses of skin under her eyes [...] I assume that means something in context, but I can't visualize it, ...


1

I found the sentence hard to read. I do not think that the problem is so much awkward grammar as it is excessive cognitive load. The sentence as written requires the reader to hold quite a number of concepts in their mind until the end of the sentence in order to understand it. There does not seem to be any rhythmic structure such as parallelism to organize ...


2

Gut feel for me says that "Well, ..." is usually a spoken rather than a written usage. Feeling is that it is written where the writer is quoting someone who is speaking. The "Well, ..." is usually a clarification of some previous point, statement, etc. where one could make an assumption, conclusion, etc. and clarification is being given ...


3

Try using a conjunction instead. For example, you could say: Although these rules have been in place for a while, shipping companies and businesses are experiencing delays as a result of incorrectly processed shipments.


22

I think you mean "while". "While" can be used as a conjunction to mean "even though" or "despite". As in, "While Bob is very tall, he still couldn't reach the top shelf." Using "while" here creates an awkward sentence because later in the same sentence you use "while" in the idiom "a while", meaning "a long time". I'd recast it using other words, such as "a ...


4

The sentence is a little off. Here's how you could fix it: Well, these rules... Or you could do this instead: These rules...


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