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I'm not sure it's in your best interest to specify that the movie should use multiple supers. Remember, a screenplay is just the blueprint for a movie. You only need to include the details the rest of the crew need to agree on to tell the story. Everything else can and should be left to the director and the rest of the filmmakers so that the final movie is ...


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Just write what you mean clearly and expect intelligent people to understand it. In a recent script I indicated I wanted various lines spoken while they appeared as text on the screen. I wrote that. It was clearly signposted. People understand it. Don't use abbreviations before you explain them. For example, above you say 'multiple supers' and I didn't know ...


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In a circus comedy act or old vaudeville, there was the capper or blow off. It turns the whole premise on it's head. The jokes escalate in a line, then a twist. Portlandia is great at this. The guy who is disgusted at the yuppie who invades his hipster culture, and keeps saying everything is now OVER! then the blow off is he is now sitting in the bar, ...


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You can hint at the tragedy early on, as a flashback or memory, without revealing the full extent of it. I don't know your story so this may be an inaccurate example, but you should get the idea and adapt it to your actual story. Opening: A man is driving his car, he tries to take a sip of his coffee from a paper cup with a plastic lid. The lid pops off, ...


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It's probably helpful to look at two extremes. 1) Give everything away up front. Tell the story chronologically. This makes it a classic origin story: tragedy makes the (anti)-hero. Goes to get revenge/redemption. Anything from the original telling of most superhero myths (Batman, Spider-Man) to revenge exploitation films like Death Wish follow this ...


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At this point in time I think you would be best writing in your native language - you can always translate it to English in a later date, either yourself or with some help. You definitely shouldn't be letting this question stop you from writing, if nothing else taking your work and translating it from your native language to English is a very good way to ...


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Do both Some of the most beautiful prose was written the authors' second languages (Nabokov, Kerouac, Beckett). Writing in different languages gives gives you access to new vocabulary, new phrases, even new ways of structuring stories. Every story you write in one language will will benefit the next one you write in the other. Of course, writing in a ...


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