23

A screenplay is written primarily for the production crew, not for the audience. So you don't have to be afraid of spoiling any plot points by using the real name of the character even though the audience isn't supposed to know it yet. Switching the name of a character mid-script would be confusing for the production crew. It would just lead to ...


11

You have several options at your disposal: You could use a descriptive name: main character, maid, angry customer. Not all characters need names. While it's a bit unusual to refer that way to long-lived characters (often they do have a name), if you are using this approach with other characters, that could go unnoticed. You could use the initials to refer to ...


10

A solution I've seen is as follows: When the character's first introduced they use the alias. Bob enters the library. Standing at a bookshelf is a LIBRARIAN, filing some books. BOB Do you have any books? LIBRARIAN Shh. then, later, ...


4

Screenplays are production documents. Screenplays communicate things that are intended for production like who says what line, so casting agents, directors, and actors know who is present in the scene without second-guessing the author or discovering it episodes later. The producer/director/casting agent of the first episode may never read any of the later ...


4

Generally a screenplay is all dialog and plot, and it's all external. So when a book is written like a screenplay, it means it has very little description, and that the internal life of the characters is not depicted. It also means you're doing all showing, no telling (which some people think is a good thing for a book and others don't). The upside is that ...


3

You don't. Directors do not of themselves decide to make a movie. This is decided by the studios. The studios will then usually approach directors to see if they want to direct said movie, based on the script. Basically because they're the ones that have to put up the money to make a movie. Since movies cost many, many millions of dollars to make they are ...


3

It's extremely easy in the case of two character. Here's how: Dual Dialogue Format: Every screenwriting software (FinalDraft, WriterDuet, Highland, etc.) I know has this feature.


2

Typically, scripts will, on first appearence of the character, introduce them by their full name, and from then on, they will use a shortened form of the name. If the character is "John Smith" he will be given his first line of dialog as "JOHN SMITH" and from then on be "JOHN". If two characters have a similar name (John Smith and John Doe) it may be ...


1

It's not out of the question to hide identity in the screenplay. In the script for Pygmalion all the principal characters are preset, but referred to by generic names: GENTLEMAN, NOTE-TAKER, FLOWER GIRL, MOTHER, DAUGHTER, and the script only refers to them by their names in scene 2 - Colonel Pickering, Henry Higgins, Eliza Doolittle, Mrs Eynsford Hill, ...


1

I think this depends on the exact scenario. Is this like Clint Eastwood's character in Sergio Leone's "Dollars Trilogy", where we just never learn his name, even though he's got friends that seem to know it? If so, you would coin a reference to this character for use in the screenplay and credits. "The Doctor" would be in this mode. Is it ...


1

The most popular are Ulysses which is subscription based and Scrivener which is a one time purchase.


1

4 years late, but if anyone stumbles across this like I did (in 2020) looking for answers, I have one! I asked my lecturer who has worked in the industry and he advised to format like the following: JOE / SAM / MARK [dialogue here] And you have the option to add the parenthetical (in unison) as well if you want, so: EMILY / KATE / RYAN (in unison) [...


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