10

Before you sign anything, read Kristine Kathryn Rusch's series on "Dealbreakers" -- clauses which, if they are in your contract, should make you walk away from the deal. For example, here's one about agents and the contracts you make with them. She doesn't seem to have a handy link where you can read the entire series, but this link comes close: http://...


8

I think you have to decide what lines you're willing to cross and which ones you aren't. It's your piece; it belongs to you. Unless you have a contract for Work for Hire or something else saying it's theirs. I suggest thinking of this as you having only two choices: Allow them to publish a version of your essay that will get you paid but that will not ...


7

You want to do whatever makes the text easiest to understand. For me, that means a mix of long and short sentences. Scientific writing is already going to be dense and complex. There are times when you have to write long sentences because you have to string a lot of information together, and separating the ideas will make them less clear. When you can, ...


6

Since the book you are translating was not written in the United States, it would be subject to the terms of the Berne Convention, which essentially is an International treaty concerning copyrights. In the simplest of terms, the countries that have signed this treaty basically agree that a copyright is intact until 70 years after the death of the original ...


6

You'll need to contact the original author and/or their publisher. Either one will direct you to the correct person to deal with - there's no blanket rule over who has which rights, so you'll need to check who's got translation rights in your specific case, and whether that person is willing to let you translate the material "officially." Your case is even ...


6

I know this has an accepted answer, but it's from Billy Bob. The APA Guide has the following to say: When writing an entire paragraph about a single study, introduce that paragraph by stating that you will refer to the same study throughout the paragraph, then cite the reference. This avoids awkwardness and redundancy. And as to indenting, this is ...


6

It depends on the rest of your text. I'd personally go with option 2, since it sounds more impersonal and straight-to-the-point, but if you already used something like the first option previously in your paper, you may want to keep the same style for consistency. Honestly I don't know if one formula is better than the other. What I can imagine is that the ...


6

According to CMU, you should include the name of the original source in or next to the quote, but "On your references page, you will only list the source you actually read". The MLA, saying "The basic rule is that in both your Works Cited list and in-text citation you will still cite [the author of the direct quote]. [the author of the direct quote] will ...


6

In a comment under your question, you said that you mostly follow APA style. This is what the Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association (6th ed.) says: 4.13 Hyphenation en dash: An en dash is longer and thinner than a hyphen yet shorter than an em dash and is used between words of equal weight in a compound adjective (e.g., ...


5

I peer review many papers; half a dozen this year. If it is defined before the first use (e.g. "For brevity we use 'randvar' to specify random variables, 'logvar' to specify logical variables.") then I wouldn't complain. Authors are entitled to invent terminology for a paper, as long as it doesn't conflict with other standard usage. For example, if 'logvar'...


4

No, there is no universally accepted standard for this. That doesn't mean there aren't standards you should follow, though. Usually, the set of required fields is dictated by the journal or conference you are publishing in. Many journals have BibTeX styles that will include the required fields for you (as long as they are present in your library, of course)....


4

My first advice: Don't make your readers' eyes bleed. Imagining several paragraphs with bold, italics, grayed text, whatever, just makes me creep. Trying to keep in mind what which formatting means, makes me cry. I wouldn't stand a page reading that. Second advice: Don't use experts' diagrams for laymen. The diagrams Maura links to are incomprehensible ...


4

I believe you need a nonbreaking hyphen. It'll keep the characters before and after it from breaking across lines. From Butterick's Practical Typography: Your word proces­sor as­sumes that any hy­phen marks a safe place to flow the text onto a new line or page. Sim­i­lar to the non­break­ing space, the non­break­ing hy­phen looks iden­ti­cal to a hy­phen ...


4

If you used a common method which is known to produce completely random and normally distributed data, just mention its name or describe it in one short sentence. It is often that various methods of random data generation are found to possess some bias, pattern, lesser than maximum possible entropy etc. - their randomness is not perfect. This may affect ...


4

Italics are a common way to emphasize words. As such, it's best to use italics sparingly. A text where every proper noun is italicized gets very annoying to read; it'd be like listening to a commercial. If you're writing for a specific publication, check their style guide.


4

Underlines are only used to indicate hyperlinks; they should not be used for emphasis. When you have a block of italicized text, and you have a phrase which would normally be italicized in book or roman text, make your italic phrase book. The ball python, also known as Python regius, is a nonvenomous python species found in Africa. This is the smallest ...


4


4

It depends on your audience and/or publisher. If this is a paper for a class, you're probably fine. But if this is your thesis/dissertation or something you're going to publish, you need to see that earlier work. It would be one thing if you were just alluding to the concept. Listing it as one you've dismissed, for example. But you're actually using the ...


3

I'm a scientist who also does programming. The way I've always done it with my colleagues is this: If the success of your project depends upon my computer code, then I'm a co-author on your FIRST journal paper. After that, if you're just re-using the same code, then I just get an acknowledgement. But if I have to do significant re-coding (not just bug ...


3

You haven't mentioned the style guide you're following; different guides have different rules. For Turabian / Chicago Style, the rules applicable are: A single-author entry precedes a multiauthor entry beginning with the same name. and Successive entries by two or more authors in which only the first author’s name is the same are alphabetized ...


3

I use mind mapping software (Freemind, Freeplane) to organize all of my writing projects. Blocks of text can be imported and then moved around as needed. You get a visual representation of your outline, as well as quick access to any part of your content. Areas that are completed, need content, or are under review are easy to mark with visual icons. When ...


3

I would say that the sentences need to be the appropriate length to what you are saying, which is liable to be, on average, shorter than novel writing. One of the reasons for using long sentences is to convey a mood, to put a lot of ideas together in one, to build and build the picture you are drawing. In scientific writing there is no need for this, so this ...


3

As I understand it, the contents for an academic thesis would normally include the main work and appendices only, everything else being additional to the core work that others may wish to refer to. If you look at the list in the previous question, the contents lists everything after itself. The items before are important, but mainly for the university - ...


3

Your thesis is motivated by some need. Novelty is hiding there. Areas of Novelty Consider at least these areas where your thesis might offer something new: Phenomena being researched. Even if the general topic has been researched to death, your research explores some specific detail that has not been studied before. That's novelty. Your research was ...


3

The convention in scientific writing, at least in the hard sciences, is to avoid "I" even for single-author papers. I suspect (but can't prove) that this is why you see so much passive voice in such papers ("the doohickey was then frobitzed to induce a somethingorother reaction"). According to this well-received answer on Academia, you can view use of "we" ...


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