10

Before you sign anything, read Kristine Kathryn Rusch's series on "Dealbreakers" -- clauses which, if they are in your contract, should make you walk away from the deal. For example, here's one about agents and the contracts you make with them. She doesn't seem to have a handy link where you can read the entire series, but this link comes close: http://...


9

I think you have to decide what lines you're willing to cross and which ones you aren't. It's your piece; it belongs to you. Unless you have a contract for Work for Hire or something else saying it's theirs. I suggest thinking of this as you having only two choices: Allow them to publish a version of your essay that will get you paid but that will not ...


6

The convention in scientific writing, at least in the hard sciences, is to avoid "I" even for single-author papers. I suspect (but can't prove) that this is why you see so much passive voice in such papers ("the doohickey was then frobitzed to induce a somethingorother reaction"). According to this well-received answer on Academia, you can view use of "we" ...


6

It depends on the rest of your text. I'd personally go with option 2, since it sounds more impersonal and straight-to-the-point, but if you already used something like the first option previously in your paper, you may want to keep the same style for consistency. Honestly I don't know if one formula is better than the other. What I can imagine is that the ...


6

According to CMU, you should include the name of the original source in or next to the quote, but "On your references page, you will only list the source you actually read". The MLA, saying "The basic rule is that in both your Works Cited list and in-text citation you will still cite [the author of the direct quote]. [the author of the direct quote] will ...


6

In a comment under your question, you said that you mostly follow APA style. This is what the Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association (6th ed.) says: 4.13 Hyphenation en dash: An en dash is longer and thinner than a hyphen yet shorter than an em dash and is used between words of equal weight in a compound adjective (e.g., ...


6

I peer review many papers; half a dozen this year. If it is defined before the first use (e.g. "For brevity we use 'randvar' to specify random variables, 'logvar' to specify logical variables.") then I wouldn't complain. Authors are entitled to invent terminology for a paper, as long as it doesn't conflict with other standard usage. For example, if 'logvar'...


6

The short answer is yes. Your job as an author is to help the reader. Acroynyms are useful but they can confuse the reader. Thus, the practice I follow is to use the full name for Three Letter Acronym (or TLA) and then use TLA thereafter. However, if you have not used that acronym recently (and only you can decide what recently is), the polite thing is to ...


5

This is a good visualisation which helps alot.


5

Underlines are only used to indicate hyperlinks; they should not be used for emphasis. When you have a block of italicized text, and you have a phrase which would normally be italicized in book or roman text, make your italic phrase book. The ball python, also known as Python regius, is a nonvenomous python species found in Africa. This is the smallest ...


5

Typically, if we are going to introduce any shorthand for a long name (including initializing it), the first time we use it in full and then note the shorter name we will use throughout: This can just be the shortened name in parentheses if no worded explanation is needed; (xxx) implies "hereinafter xxxx". Or it can be an actual sentence to ...


4

I don't have citations, but I've seen a couple approaches to this problem: "One possible application of (this work) would be to..." -- by casting it speculatively like that, using "would be", you're saying "this is an idea, not something we've demonstrated". "A possible application of (this work) not found in our review of the literature is..." -- here you'...


4

I believe you need a nonbreaking hyphen. It'll keep the characters before and after it from breaking across lines. From Butterick's Practical Typography: Your word proces­sor as­sumes that any hy­phen marks a safe place to flow the text onto a new line or page. Sim­i­lar to the non­break­ing space, the non­break­ing hy­phen looks iden­ti­cal to a hy­phen ...


4

Italics are a common way to emphasize words. As such, it's best to use italics sparingly. A text where every proper noun is italicized gets very annoying to read; it'd be like listening to a commercial. If you're writing for a specific publication, check their style guide.


4

If you used a common method which is known to produce completely random and normally distributed data, just mention its name or describe it in one short sentence. It is often that various methods of random data generation are found to possess some bias, pattern, lesser than maximum possible entropy etc. - their randomness is not perfect. This may affect ...


4

It depends on your audience and/or publisher. If this is a paper for a class, you're probably fine. But if this is your thesis/dissertation or something you're going to publish, you need to see that earlier work. It would be one thing if you were just alluding to the concept. Listing it as one you've dismissed, for example. But you're actually using the ...


3

Your thesis is motivated by some need. Novelty is hiding there. Areas of Novelty Consider at least these areas where your thesis might offer something new: Phenomena being researched. Even if the general topic has been researched to death, your research explores some specific detail that has not been studied before. That's novelty. Your research was ...


3

OK, I finally found it. It seems to vary by journal. Here are ones related to publication of artwork (figures and plots) for Elsevier: https://www.elsevier.com/authors/author-schemas/artwork-and-media-instructions/artwork-sizing * *


3

You haven't mentioned the style guide you're following; different guides have different rules. For Turabian / Chicago Style, the rules applicable are: A single-author entry precedes a multiauthor entry beginning with the same name. and Successive entries by two or more authors in which only the first author’s name is the same are alphabetized ...


3

I'm a scientist who also does programming. The way I've always done it with my colleagues is this: If the success of your project depends upon my computer code, then I'm a co-author on your FIRST journal paper. After that, if you're just re-using the same code, then I just get an acknowledgement. But if I have to do significant re-coding (not just bug ...


3

I work across disciplines including geology, biology, and chemistry. I currently collaborate with atmospheric chemists, on a manuscript primarily geared for microbial ecologists. As a first general strategy, if you can find an example of another scholar blending the two fields you're interested in, you can do something like: "Using the rationale of xxx, we ...


3

Ideally you should not only cite both sources (and others like the 1969 a one that credit the 1944 source), but also acknowledge and defend being your discussion in the 1969 explanation. After all, the paper that invented the idea often didn't explain it in the way people find most pedagogically useful today. You could go with something like this (if the ...


3

+1 user37826, that is my answer. I understand you are showing the +/- in the superscript and subscript, respectively, but I don't like this format at all; for one it doesn't give the confidence level being quoted. 90%? 95%? 99.9%? is that a 3-sigma or 5-sigma result? If I were your advisor I'd tell you to stop trying to save space or be "efficient" and ...


3

You would write "1 million" or "1M". When abbreviated, capitalization is necessary, but by itself, "million" is lowercase. capitalizemytitle.com explains this: ...million, billion, hundred, thousand are NOT capitalized, and neither are the words “billionaire” or “millionaire” as they are considered to be professions, and they ...


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