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22

Remember that 100% of what is in your book is there because you want it to impact the reader in one way or another. Nothing absolutely has to be in there except what you choose. If it isn't serving the story, and your aims as a writer, yank it out. With that in mind, let's examine what you're trying to do with these problematic sections: Maybe it's ...


15

If you watch enough Star Trek (at least the good series... the bad ones tend to do groan worthy stuff that makes no sense) you'll find that the "Royal Smart Person" will rattle off a string of technobabble and immediately follow it up with the "For the dummies in the back" analogy to something that's a bit more common for the people to understand. In the ...


11

I, personally, hate one of suggested approaches of "following it up with for the dummies in the back", which seems to be very popular in US-made works. It just screams: "Hey, reader, me, hero is smart and you and all those other characters around me are dumb, allow me to explain my brilliance to you, troglodytes!" It is especially painful if it follows with ...


7

Technobabble is in the eye of the POV character. TV shows have a limitation. They mostly can convey what happens by showing it happen. Sometimes they can convey stuff by having characters talk about what happen, but you still have to listen to them talk. Very rarely, mostly in comedy, will the narrator just talk over characters and explain something more ...


4

Maybe you shouldn't mitigate it. Maybe your readers like it. In the movie "The Martian," they didn't mitigate the science. They highlighted the science. If you're going to write science fiction, go ahead and make it sciencey.


3

I think mitigation of technobabble in a good science fiction comes from technical language being used meaningfully. Using a string of fancy scientific language to make a character seem smart is generally the kind of technobabble people hate; it pisses off non-technical readers by making them feel confused, and pisses off technical readers even more because ...


2

"What is the best way to avoid or mitigate dense "technobabble" and scientific lingo in a science fiction setting..." hszmv and Andrey both have great answers. I was also thinking that you could gloss over some of the stuff you consider to be babble and focus on the key features. "...and make it easier on the reader in general?" If you don't want to gloss ...


2

The question I read from your post is "How do I know when I need to explain the rules of the world and when I can let them be?" A short answer: if the reader wants an explanation, then provide an explanation. A theoretical answer: it depends on the reader's expectations. Reader expectations, firstly, depend on the book the reader decided to read. ...


1

Yes. Something like this has been done before. At any given moment, there might be 9,728 planes in the air carrying 1,270,406 people around the world. Every crew on each of these planes depends on having accurate, readable, flight manuals on their aircraft. The Aviation industry has addressed the issue of how best to encode and decode information by ...


1

Considering you are describing situations where serious injuries happen without the proper equipment (or people) available to treat them, there is a field of expertise very familiar with this problem: military field medicine. Soldiers get injured all the time on patrols or in the heat of battles, sometimes very far away from the medical facilities that can ...


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