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I've a little experience writing sci-fi, so take my advice with at least half a pinch of salt, but here's my way of looking at it: he figures out how to chemically produce water from shuttle fuel and grows plants for food from the seeds that his crashed shuttle was carrying. Sci-fi explains how things are done with two motives: to make it seem plausible, ...


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Have you read the Ender Series? And its Formic War Trilogy? The difference is fairly stark sometimes. The original series treats most things the way we treat cars, internet, and smartphones. Just as a matter of course. It only explains just enough to develop character (often two ver charismatic characters trying to explain something to the other in a back ...


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To someone who doesn't read SF, this may seem like a very highly focused technical question about one tiny issue in writing SF. But to me, as a lifelong SF reader, this seems impossibly broad. This is sort of like asking, "I want to learn to do oil painting. How do I use brush-strokes?" To narrow things down more, I would suggest you start by narrowing down ...


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I think mitigation of technobabble in a good science fiction comes from technical language being used meaningfully. Using a string of fancy scientific language to make a character seem smart is generally the kind of technobabble people hate; it pisses off non-technical readers by making them feel confused, and pisses off technical readers even more because ...


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Maybe you shouldn't mitigate it. Maybe your readers like it. In the movie "The Martian," they didn't mitigate the science. They highlighted the science. If you're going to write science fiction, go ahead and make it sciencey.


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I, personally, hate one of suggested approaches of "following it up with for the dummies in the back", which seems to be very popular in US-made works. It just screams: "Hey, reader, me, hero is smart and you and all those other characters around me are dumb, allow me to explain my brilliance to you, troglodytes!" It is especially painful if it follows with ...


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Remember that 100% of what is in your book is there because you want it to impact the reader in one way or another. Nothing absolutely has to be in there except what you choose. If it isn't serving the story, and your aims as a writer, yank it out. With that in mind, let's examine what you're trying to do with these problematic sections: Maybe it's ...


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"What is the best way to avoid or mitigate dense "technobabble" and scientific lingo in a science fiction setting..." hszmv and Andrey both have great answers. I was also thinking that you could gloss over some of the stuff you consider to be babble and focus on the key features. "...and make it easier on the reader in general?" If you don't want to gloss ...


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Technobabble is in the eye of the POV character. TV shows have a limitation. They mostly can convey what happens by showing it happen. Sometimes they can convey stuff by having characters talk about what happen, but you still have to listen to them talk. Very rarely, mostly in comedy, will the narrator just talk over characters and explain something more ...


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If you watch enough Star Trek (at least the good series... the bad ones tend to do groan worthy stuff that makes no sense) you'll find that the "Royal Smart Person" will rattle off a string of technobabble and immediately follow it up with the "For the dummies in the back" analogy to something that's a bit more common for the people to understand. In the ...


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