New answers tagged

1

As others have pointed out, barriers to a relationship are an often-used device to prolong the tension and keep the reader wondering. They can be hard rules (e.g., marriage, work regulations, societal taboo on homosexuality) or soft ones (e.g., "I'm not looking for a relationship right now"). You can work without an explicit barrier by ascribing a minor one ...


0

Unfortunately, even if a character spots another, attractive character across a room and does not speak to them for the whole book; if they do not have similar encounters with others, the reader will assume they will get together. It's unfortunate, but for once the tropes work against you. The only way to bypass or subvert the trope is for there to be no ...


3

No, you can't fool the reader. But there are certain ways to make matchmaking less obvious during the course of your story. Provide a lot of action. This is a frequently used approach, which can be combined with the other ways. Readers' attention won't be focused on the brewing romance, and when your characters are finally ending up together, it would be ...


0

You don't have to do anything. People love matchmaking, and fictional matchmaking is particularly attractive, since it is easy and consequence free. It's harder to keep fans from reading romance between the lines where none is intended than it is to encourage them.So, in other words, just keep writing your main characters as platonic friends, but feel free ...


0

I am an amateur writer and I thought before I published the romance: this book will be successful for sure. It does not have a happy end. I know, the most of the readers want happy end. 10 days after launch I got my first review: 1 star. The sentence began: "Are you kidding me?..." I still love my romance but I will never ever write a romance without happy ...


3

How can chemistry be perceived without giving evidence that they will be a couple in the future? You can make the chemistry perceptible without going over the top, but then you need a barrier between them, something the characters feel will not change and will not allow them to be together. One of them is happily married with no intent of cheating; ...


2

I think it, sadly, depends on the genders of your characters. If it's a m/f couple people are much more likely to notice the chemistry and start shipping them faster and have more hope that they'll actually get together. With a m/m or m/f ship you're much more likely to pass under the radar and have the chemistry chalked up to just being good friends or ...


2

I've heard it said that the best endings are completely expected and completely a surprise at the same time. Expected, because you, the author, have built a set of promises for the ending over the course of the book, but unexpected, because the characters, and the readers, don't expect how the narrative's promises are going to be fulfilled (even if they ...


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