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56

Don't make them LGBT characters, make them characters who happen to be LGBT. Write them as if you would write any romance with the only exception being that the relationships is between 2 males or 2 females. This is because straight or gay relationships don't differ so much, it is mostly the peoples reactions/prejudices on those relationships that are ...


17

I would say to leverage your LGBT friends for feedback. If you have a problem with a stereotype, it might be embarrassing for you if it gets pointed out, or if you accidentally offend someone with it, but it is much better to get it out and correct it than to secretly hold it and not even realize what your own prejudices are. If you have have a bunch of ...


9

The often misunderstood adage, "write what you know," is best understood this way in my opinion: write what you know from personal, emotional experience. Whatever topic we write about, we cannot do justice unless we have personal experience with it or draw deeply from the personal experiences of others. So in short, if you don't have personal experience as ...


8

This is an extremely good question and I would love to offer some advice from other writers I've found helpful! If you are ESL or new at writing romance scenes, your initial romantic scenes definitely have a high potential for being "cringe," and it's often difficult to pinpoint exactly why or where you went wrong. It's usually not because you aren'...


6

Just write her like a person. There's really not much else to it. I know it may feel like girls are confusing and mysterious at your age, but honestly, in almost any situation, you should take the same approach to writing a female character as you would with a male character, with some minor caveats. When it comes to what goes on in the heads of people with ...


4

Simply put, it's okay to kill the main character. There's just one thing to worry about, make sure that you don't make it to where the character dies because they die. The reader shouldn't walk out thinking "What was the point of reading the story if he was going to die?". If this is what you get out of readers, then your character, no matter how ...


4

I see two options, which depend on the "world" your protagonists live in. In a perfect world, being attracted to a person of the same sex is accepted and nobody bats an eyelid about it. It's just a matter of fact, and then your story is just like a regular heterosexual relationship (or attempt at one): A has a crush on B, does B reciprocate? (Option for ...


3

First, consider how much you actually want the love triangle element. If you've managed to write a compelling, believable couple with good chemistry, you've already done better than a lot of romance writers. Does the extra relationship add more to the story than it takes away? If so, try thinking of it in terms of satisfaction. What does your protagonist ...


3

FIRST, consider your character's sexuality in context. You’re writing a LGBTQ person, but there’s a huge variation of what exactly that looks like. Did your protagonist grow up in a mostly-accepting or mostly-unaccepting area? Are they out to everyone, to just friends, to close family, to no one at all? Do they have a connection to other LGBTQ people or no? ...


2

Your best bet is to read from the start by putting yourself in the MC shoes and see if while you are reading if you get more of a reaction out of one girl then the other. Another option is to consider where you want the MC and the girls to be like by the end. If you have an end point in mind for each you can chose the girl who matches better with how the MC ...


2

Take a look at which relationship is stronger. Seeing as Cassidy has been around him longer, that means that there has been more time for them to bond. But since Cassidy, unlike Diane, grew up with him, he could feel a greater brother-sister relationship. Take a look at more sides and see who is bonded more. In the end, it's your choice.


2

Genuinely erotic writing isn't about fulfillment, it's about frustration, about the rising helpless obsession of people who haven't yet come together. That's why the key to most romance writing is figuring out how to keep your protagonists apart, not how to bring them together. In the event, however, that you do need to write about actual sex, remember that ...


2

When GOALS are at odds with one another, it can lead to conflict. One of the most classic ways of creating tension or arguments between characters is to give them motivations/goals that on the face of things seem to conflict with one another (even if they really don't, either because some plot twist that resolves the conflict hasn't occurred yet, or because ...


2

You need to ask yourself what kind of story are you trying to tell, what are the themes and the core messages. Then ask yourself whether the ending including Dylan's survival contributes or detracts from those things compared to an ending including his death. How do your characters grow, learn, and change over the course of the story? What is Dylan's role in ...


1

Try reading Brandon Sanderson's Mistborn Trilogy. Spoiler Alert One of the main characters gets killed in an epic battle at the climax of the first book. However, he then becomes a martyr and god to the people so his influence lives on, while other more subordinate characters rise to become main characters in their own right in later books. Really ...


1

And they never recovered the body... I'm a big fan of the 'mysterious death' scenario. I've even seen games that integrate this into the rules. In this case, as the MC defeats the hero, he/they go plummeting downward into the clouds over the sea. The body(ies) is/are never recovered. This way, readers who also love the MC can hope he's really NOT dead, and ...


1

Yes, it is okay to kill a main character. But be careful, readers experience the story you've written through your characters. Killing a character could effectively shut one the windows your reader views the world though. However, there's nothing about death which forces a character's presence to vanish from your story and your reader to lose that vehicle of ...


1

Heck yeah, you can kill a main character. If you've read the Harry Potter series, Spoiler alert if you haven't The Goblet of Fire opens up with a character who quickly becomes central to that books story line. Cedric Diggory was created as a mostly perfect character, (very likable, handsome, nice) specifically so that when he was killed at the end of the ...


1

Everyone has arguments. They are just of a different kind. Your characters are selfless, kindhearted and don't have quick tempers? That reminds me, in fact, of my mother. Was she the type of a person inclined to have arguments? Not at all. Did she have arguments with other people (and me in particular)? Absolutely! Kind and selfless people wouldn't start ...


1

First I have to say: respect. I think it's great that you are highly motivated at such a young age and even willing to write in many genres. With that out of the way. I have to disagree about: all humans are mostly the same. This sort of thing leads to writing a Roman emperor as you would write a modern female radio host. This is the Hollywood approach and a ...


1

One of the best examples I know for this is in both the book and movie of Remains of the Day. The emotionally repressed main character is in love with his coworker, but never admits it, either to himself or to her. There's a wonderful scene where he drops and shatters a prized, vintage bottle of wine --completely out of character for him --on the day he ...


1

Put it in the story If you (the author) are debating how to proceed, it might be an opportunity to put that same 'conflict' into your story. Transfer your hesitation, and the whole "What if I…" debate onto your character. We'll get to see how the character is 'not aggressive' and 'not outgoing', and we'll know he must get past this indecision to get what he ...


1

It sounds like you are in draft mode either pick the most compelling one that moves the plot along in a way you prefer most or rewrite it until there is no other options left for them to go and one way or bust is the solution. If you are in draft and your mind really wants to chase rabbit holes on these what if scenarios then pick one and go down as far ...


1

I once wrote a short story as a challenge for a contest in high school, for an English Class. It was about two people - Alex and Taylor. The story followed the two around a trip to Paris. They visited several places, did romantic couple things, shared a few kisses, spent the night on a hotel, and ended up getting themselves on a rather mundane but fun ...


1

Short answer: yes. If something feels clichéd, and you don't like that, one way to freshen it up is to throw another trope or cliché into the mix. You can think of this as an exercise in lateral thinking, a way to challenge your brain into coming up with creative ideas. For instance, if you combine a love triangle with the initial animosity (your first two ...


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