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4

This is a tricky one, as the advice would usually be "write however feels natural to you". But I want to help, so I'll try. Writing, by its nature, is an art. It's subjective - especially when we're talking about a "style". A style isn't always quantifiable, like grammar for example. Style is nuanced and ambiguous, often difficult to put ...


3

Paying attention to rhythm (i.e., caring about it) is the first step. After that, I recommend reading some instructional material on the subject. A book that has helped me greatly in many areas of writing (not just rhythm) is On Writing Well by William F. Zinsser. It is probably out of print, but if you can get hold of a copy, I highly recommend it. One ...


3

Both of your books are correct, but they are talking about different types of rhythm --or more properly, rhythm at different scales. At the level of individual words, rhythm is created by the pattern of stressed and unstressed syllables. For instance: Whose woods these are, I think I know His house is in the village, though - Robert Frost This is regular ...


3

Voice is highly individual --it's a large part of what makes your writing distinct, so there aren't really any rule-based ways to develop it. In fact, many of the strongest writers' voices break rules that are ironclad for other people. I would recommend finding some writers whose voice you admire, and writing some pieces in imitation of them --not for ...


2

The first thing to note is that making prose style sound too much like poetry doesn't make it sound right. It still has to sound like prose. What I found useful was not so much consciously attending to the style structure as reading great stylists and writing imitations of them. Often horrendously bad imitations, but it helped master getting the words to ...


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Ray Bradbury recommended reading poetry. Every day. It does help.


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