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12

I highly suggest you do nothing. A) is a very bad idea - it will tarnish your reputation as argumentative and rude. C) could easily be construed as doing A) -- even with the best intentions, someone could take it out of context -- so it's also best to avoid that. As for if my answer would change for a different type of novel, definitely no. This is good ...


10

Go to a local university and speak with a writer in residence or a professor who is well-respected. Take creative writing courses and listen to the feedback. Join a writers group - but remember, being told that your work is far from perfect is the point. Poetry is such an intensely personal and universal form that you must just keep writing. Listen to ...


8

I've had a look at allpoetry.com, a few review sites such as sitejabber.com and sites reporting about it such as PlagiarismToday.com. On their registration site they mention quite a huge number of members - "Over 500,000 poets get feedback and improve their poetry". I couldn't find any information about how many of them could be considered "active" and how ...


7

Once you publish something, it's out beyond your grasp. I strongly recommend against publishing a piece that you feel still has work to be done on. Self-publishing a novel that still needs editing is not a wise stepping stone to feedback and constructive criticism. First of all, as an unpolished book, it's unlikely to receive much attention; good critics ...


7

1) Leave comments: There are many film review blogs. Comment under their reviews. Like: "Interestingly, we have really different view on quality of the movie. some detail from your review" Btw, The comments should be on topic, interesting and not bragging ones. Everyone hates "hey, visit my awesome blog!" comment 2) Do giveaways and promos Do you have ...


6

An important consideration is that in the US, the FTC requires clear disclosure of paid reviews by bloggers. Both the advertiser and the blogger may be held liable if the blogger does not disclose that the review was paid. From http://www.ftc.gov/sites/default/files/attachments/press-releases/ftc-publishes-final-guides-governing-endorsements-testimonials/...


6

-The word count is not the most important thing. It is your blog, your review, your opinion. It is not a college assignment that it should have a word limit. -The best idea to write a review for an app or a game is to "develop it as it goes" like you mentioned. -The idea is to give your views about the app or the game. -A couple of things that readers ...


6

Yes, you can ask for feedback at any and all of those stages. The feedback which is helpful at any stage is "This works and here's why" and "This doesn't work and here's why." The "here's why" is the MOST IMPORTANT part of feedback. If your reader can only say "I don't like this," it's a waste of everyone's time. Proofreading should be done at later ...


6

The answer would greatly depend on who you're beta-reading for, and what they ask you for. One writer might have specific questions they'd want you to answer. Another would just ask for your impression. One might want to hear your opinion (in person, or on the phone), another might want it written down. Some authors might ask you to focus on some specific ...


5

The Dutch game society Ducosim (Site's in Dutch!) rates games on the following aspects: Design Repeatability Luck-Tactic Value for money All ratings are 0-5 stars. Many types of games are reviewed. Another method to enrich a single 0-10 rate is to list the most significant positives and negatives. (Like IGN or Gamespot does.) A useful link may be the ...


5

As I see it, getting paid for reviews can be broken down into different scenarios: You work for someone that pays you to review other products i.e. you're being paid by a neutral party with no affiliation to the product itself. You are approached by someone with a vested interest in the product, and are either paid to review that product, or get given the ...


5

There are many places to get good feedback for your work. You said you wanted a professional to look over your work and in that case, if you plan on publishing, I would suggest hiring an editor. But you can go to a community of good writers such as silver pen writers or scribophile. However, I would like to point out that you also need to get feedback from ...


5

The author retains copyright. Amazon does not claim to control or own customer reviews. Instead they claim a right of "sublicense" where they are allowed to republish the review forever. They specifically use the term "nonexclusive". They claim no IP rights over your review, just the ability to display it (and parts of it) in any form on any media. ...


4

I'm going to add some things to the already great answer given by Pavel above. 1) Have a Twitter box and Facebook box. I want to follow you on Twitter or like you on Facebook, but you're not doing anything to help me. I have to search for your Twitter handle on Google and for most people that's just cumbersome. I can't even get to your Facebook page btw. ...


4

Hooking lines make the reader ask one or more of the following questions: What? Why? How? When? Where? A good example are the stories of Blind Willow, Sleeping Woman by Haruki Murakami (yes, I'm sick of the "Call me Ishmael", and the "they shot the white girl first" examples). "Man-Eating Cats" I bought a newspaper at the harbor and came across an ...


4

I have just been through the experience of having obtained a Kirkus Review. I paid for the expedited version. I feel violated. The review was worse than disappointing. The review gave an introductory somewhat inaccurate plot summary, and then added some comments that were so damaging that they would guarantee that no-one would want to read the book. The ...


4

This site doesn't seem to be explicitly listed as a vanity/scam on the Writer's Beware list here: https://www.sfwa.org/other-resources/for-authors/writer-beware/anthologies/ , but I was thinking of Poetry.com, which died a few years ago. So most vanity anthology schemes don’t quite qualify as scams. They are deceptive and misleading, however–especially ...


4

Poetry is a tough art to critique, because it's extremely personal, making it very subjective. In particular, given the modern forms tend to be rule-breaking, it can also be hard to judge, even on a technical level. It's also not a commercially remunerative artform, so even the feedback of the market doesn't tell you much. With all that in mind, your best ...


4

I would recommend watching SFDebris' various "Opinionated Guides to Star Trek" (which to date have entries for all 6 live action series, the Animated Series, and the Films). He is of course a Superfan who describes the origin of the site as having a college assignment to make a website but no content for the website, and to his mind "bitching about Voyager ...


3

My husband is also a writer, so I'm constantly bouncing ideas off of him throughout my researching and plotting phases. Usually by the time I'm writing, I don't say much about story changes. But once I start writing, no one looks at my work until I've edited it a few times on my own. Then my hubby sees it, I edit it again, and then I send it out to beta ...


3

Coming to this question 2 years after it was posted, I find the following: Of a total of 11 reviews, there is 1 5-star review, 1 4-star review, and 9 1-star reviews. Nothing in-between. Of the low reviews, some are clearly against you because of your positions. We will be attacked by the world and by the devil, we do not need these kinds of attacks ...


3

Difficult and subjective question. I'm sure it's a good investment for some books and not for others. As head of a smaller indie press, I didn't find it to be a worthwhile value for the cost. Alternatives include: booklife, bookreviewrequest, librarything's member giveaway and contacting reviewers directly. It MIGHT be worth paying for Kirkus or PW to do ...


3

I think the cheapest way is to publish your book via Amazon Direct Publishing. It cost literally zero (well, unless you hire someone to do the cover. In my case, I designed the cover myself). If people like your book (or end up hating it) you'll get some reviews. If you want detailed and quality reviews, I suggest Scribophile (a community for writers to ...


3

If you are looking for actually useful feedback on your poems, I would suggest something like Scribophile (don't know if there are other sites that do the same thing). On Scribophile, you earn karma points by critiquing other works that have been posted. You generally get some bonuses by giving feedback that the author finds useful. You then use these karma ...


3

I would recommend Scribophile Scibophile is a writing critique site based around earning points and then spending them to have others review your work. While there is a paid option to the site, this allows you to save more of your writing on the site but does not in a huge way impact your ability to get critiques. The basic idea of the site is that in order ...


3

Publishers tend to look to other authors for book reviews, because they can add statements from these authors that give the promoted book weight. You can look at blogs, Amazon and Goodreads for samples of reviews. A lot of book reviewers start their own blogs/websites and authors seek them out for reviews once they have achieved a following. A book ...


3

Review writing is in fact a type of journalism, and is generally classified as opinion writing. As such there's few hard and fast rules about how to go about it. Success as a reviewer mainly depends on your appeal to your audience, whether it's the quality / insight of your analysis, your sense of humor, or the beauty of your writing that draws people to you....


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