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68

If you are submitting to a professional journal that (like many) puts a short blurb about the author(s) somewhere in the article or journal, you could provide a suggested blurb and ensure that there is at least one feminine pronoun in it somewhere. If they don't, or you don't know, you could say, "in case you need an author's introduction, here is a ...


58

As a person of color, I've sometimes had a version of the same dilemma. Is there a professional organization for people of your gender and expertise? If so, you could join the organization, and then sign as follows: Morgan Meredith American Women Tech Writers Association or Morgan Meredith Member, American Women Tech Writers If there is no such ...


34

I also have a confusing first name. When I want to clarify, I sign email as "Firstname Lastname (Ms.)". That conveys my gender as effectively as "Ms. Firstname Lastname", but by putting the title at the end and in parentheses, I don't look like I'm insisting on being addressed by that title. I strongly recommend against putting your photo in your CV, cover ...


33

I once saw someone in your situation address the problem by adding a (gendered) middle name to signatures. This could either be your real middle name if you have one, or a nickname that you're prepared to answer to. If it's your real name, just write it normally: Morgan Ann Meredith If it's a nickname, that is, a name you're happy to have people use ...


24

Use a courtesy title which reflects your gender. Sign your submission as "Ms. Morgan Meredith." Subtle but unambiguous.


14

This answer may be controversial and it hinges on you having stated that your "work speaks for itself"... If you assume the tech industry has a bias towards men, then not stating you are a woman would actually be beneficial to you in this case, no? On the other hand, if you assume there is no such bias towards men, then why the need to stress that you are ...


12

While I get the feeling this might get deemed "opinion based" I've reviewed a few hundred technical CVs in my time (for my sins) so here goes nothing! Personal Use of "I.." or "My role.." type statements a) humanize you so the person reading the CV can see you as a human being rather than just the CV and b) they tie the achievements to you. Impersonal does ...


11

Another option you may want to consider is to add your preferred pronouns to your email signature. I'm in academia, and I'm starting to see this more frequently. It's particularly useful for trans or non-binary individuals to make their preferred gender pronouns explicit, and it is slowly gaining some traction among cis gendered individuals who want to help ...


10

I would skip the poetry, but use the personal approach. Project X I had several duties on this project. My primary responsibility was mixing dangerous chemicals in a cauldron for various experiments, including an attempt to liquefy kryptonite. In my second year on this project, I joined a team devising new procedures for testing the limits of ...


9

The best date formats are the ones that are (1) clear and (2) familiar to your audience. You want your readers to focus on the content of your resume/CV, and this will be difficult if they have to "translate" dates to a familiar format in their heads while reading. In general, the two extremes - long, unambiguous dates verses shorter, more informal dates - ...


8

Your work should speak for itself. If they address you in an incorrect formal manner, such as Mr, Mrs, or Miss, then just respond with a thanks with the correct or preferred title. Your appearance, name, or sexual preference is not irrelevant to your work.


8

You're focusing on the wrong angle. Think about it this way: why would a potential employer care that you wrote a report? What skill set does it show you have? What does it prove you could do again? So think about the report: Why did you write the report? For whom? Boss, peers, IT, management, accounting? What are they going to do with the report when it's ...


8

It's not formally correct sentence structure, but it occurs in many types of writing and I've not heard of anyone being confused by it. In a novel, it could be considered part of the narrator's style or character, for example : I went into town this morning. Walked along the street and went into a shop. Left after finding there was nothing there that ...


7

Keep the style consistent across the whole document, no matter how short the paragraphs. If you indent any paragraph above a list, keep doing so. There are various guidelines if you should indent or not, but none of them are solid rules. Consistency is an ancient rule of style though. So, no rule, but don't make exceptions for short lines. If you want a ...


7

There are actually quite a few options, many of which come naturally when you're not forced to consciously write formally. You can change the verb into an –ing: "Having done freelance for 8 years, I..." "Choosing to work from home has..." or in some cases turn the verb into the subject or your sentence. "Experience with Java has helped..." ...


6

As a former employer I agree that most employers don't care about reports that you might have written. You need to stress knowledge and experience in a resume. If you have no experience (that the company can use) the best you might be able to do is show knowledge in a way that someone might ask you a question in an interview. And unless the company you are ...


5

Pretend you are writing an email, and that the recipient will read it as plain text. "To put spacing between sections, hit 'enter' instead of using the space bar.... To highlight subheadings, use all caps. In lieu of bullet points, use "-" or "*" characters" (How to Format a Resume for Online Applications). (You can also use "+".) See if you can find an ...


5

Bear in mind that a compact numerical date format like 01/02/2013 uses a different convention in the US than in Europe. In the US it's interpreted as month/day/year, while in Europe it's day/month/year. So if you're writing a document that might be read in both hemispheres, I'd avoid the compact form. If it's only one or the other, less of an issue. A form ...


5

Context is key to what the rules of grammar are. Any grammarian who tells you English lacks hidden subjects is talking about how a complete sentence looks. But the rules for bullet points can be a little different. In English verb conjugations often don't make the subject clear, because present-tense verbs conjugate one way for third person singular and ...


5

Your question 1 is too long, but where you should break it is not where you broke it. The information about the professor is a sidenote and is a parenthetical remark if ever I saw one. Also, you can't "carry out" a degree, and "I hold a degree that was earned" is verbose; "I earned my degree" would be more concise. So my suggestion is: I earned my math ...


5

There are probably about as many ways to write a CV as there are people who have ever read or written at least one. You might want to include at least also an e-mail address in the contact details section. One thing you would put into the Additional section (unless you add a specific section for it) is any (professional) references. I simply wrote a fairly ...


5

Most résumés seem to solve this issue by creating bullet points and starting each bullet point with the verb.


3

If your first language isn't English and you write your CV in English, find a native speaker who can correct your errors. English CVs start listing the previous jobs/education with the newest topic (your last job) and go down to the oldest (where you went to school). In Germany, for example, it's the other way around. But you do not have to follow that ...


3

If you did it for educational credit, put it with Education. If you did it in a field which happens to be the one in which you got your degree, but your university didn't care one way or the other, put it under Work. Timeframe is always just dates: September 2008–May 2010.


3

It is always worth thinking about what you can do to make your resume stand out against the crowd. My response is below (but not in the exact order you asked). Under the heading "Professional Profile" you could include a list of some of the videos you have published to Youtube along with a shortcode link to the those videos. Be sure to provide some context, ...


3

Because of the lack of diversity in the tech industry, many of these companies are looking to add diversity to their contributor pools, so they place priority on people of color, women, LGBTQ writers, and so on. There's also evidence that diversity credos harm diversity, precisely because applicants who would usually be vigilant about not disclosing their ...


3

Speaking as a former division manager of a public company that has hired dozens of programmers and engineers and read hundreds of resumes: Use "I". It is expected. Stick to the facts, do not engage in puffery, but do not be afraid to note very positive results; either (as you have). Do not be so stilted in your language. I would not use the word "utilize"...


3

The personal style has one big advantage, especially for people who are a bit shy about "selling themselves". If your sentences start with "I", they are (by definition) about what you actually did. In the impersonal style, it's easy to slip into describing what your team, or your employer, did (e.g. they made $$$$ selling this wonderful world-leading ...


2

Instead of saying, "I have experience with X," consider describing what you did with X. "I created a global meteor defense system using Java and Arduino."


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