17

Here are some books that should help. Where it makes sense, I'm trying to include the date and place of publication, a description, and a quote for context. (Not all of the information in these books will be helpful, unless you don't know what consonants and vowels are.) A Key to the Art of Letters, 1700, London: Earlier than your timeframe but still worth ...


7

180 is the average number of words per minute a human reads. Take the number of words and divide it by 180. Here you go. The average human should take 1 minute to read 180 words. Some platforms may use different numbers, and platforms that track your actual reading pace (e.g. a Kindle device or app) might adjust themselves to your own average speed -- ...


7

What you are looking for are resources on rhetorical analysis and/or rhetorical criticism. These are critical works that study a work of writing (written or orally delivered) not for its content but its structure, in order to elucidate how the author makes their argument compelling. Rhetorical criticism is an ancient art, and the modern practices trace ...


6

I would start with the literature produced by suicide prevention programs. Its targeting the minds of people considering suicide and its trying to educate people of the warning signs, and how to help. This will provide you with insight into the mental frame of your characters Then, you can access research materials produced by psychologists and social ...


6

Medium divides the wordcount of a post by 275 words per minute. For images they count 12 seconds for the first image, 11 seconds for the second image, and minus an additional second for each subsequent image. Any images after the tenth image are counted at three seconds per image. They emphasize that this is an estimation and that in the future, "we’d like ...


5

Writing accurate dialogue for a time period other than the one you live in can be particularly challenging. Here's how I would approach it. Read literature and novels written during the 1920's or set in the 1920's. The best way to know how people talked is to read books written during or set within your target time period. For your specific query, off ...


5

I'm a fellow Writing Excuses lover. I discovered their podcast somewhere during Season 11 and then decided to backtrack and listen to everything that came before. I've listened to literally hundreds of episodes, probably averaging 4 a week for the last couple of years. I've found so much good advice, and I believe it's an incredible resource. But they are ...


5

Comics have an age rating system similar to videogames, but it's not completely standardized. Marvel and DC, the biggest comics producers, have slightly different systems from each other. And here's yet another system for English language Manga. They're all based mostly on ages but they divide them up differently. 13+, 15+, 16+, etc. Comixology (the ...


5

Westlake, J. Willis (James Willis), 1830-1912, wrote at least three "how-to-write" books, including How to write letters: a manual of correspondence.


4

If the idea is to have battles with a medieval feel, then the choice lies on Epitoma rei militaris by P. Vegati Renati (now better known as Vegetius). While Rome produced many excellent military treatises, this one was the most popular throughout the Middles Ages in Europe. His work was studied, rewritten and adapted to the new techniques as they appeared, ...


4

Have you tried TV Tropes? It is a wiki which describes story "tropes" (i.e. the various narrative elements, tricks and occasional fails of the storytelling art). It is vast and has a loose but fairly well defined structure; tropes are organised by category and are extensively hyperlinked. Works, creators and genres are also given, with lots of links ...


4

Although I personally have no problem either writing or reading explicit sex scenes (sex is a form of entertainment, after all), if you feel constrained by your distribution options, I would make the fact that sex occurred more explicit, and leave no doubt in the mind of the audience that yes, sex occurred, she screwed this guy to get a promotion or whatever ...


4

I recommend The Corpus of Contemporary American English (and for BrE its sister the British National Corpus). It's a very powerful tool, supporting wildcards, part of speech tagging, grouping by lemma (e.g. dies, dying, and died can all be grouped with die), and the ability to see the context of what texts matched. As an aside I'll note that I don't like ...


3

While this may not be specifically related to your character’s abilities, what I have seen many writers do for characters with similar abilities is distinguish the ”translation” or whatever the special character is understanding or interpreting by using italics. For example, ”I just want to take a few pictures of you guys to use in our latest catalog. I ...


3

The closest I could find was The Gender Balance of The New York Times Best Seller list on The Pudding comparing gender to genre. It barely scratches the surface of what you're looking for, but includes their data sources (specifically the Virtual International Authority File and OCLC Classify) at the bottom of the article. Like tryin commented, you'll still ...


3

Here are some options for how to structure this and for where to put the focus: Chronological Narrate the process as it happens. The important thing to remember is that while the loss of the arm is a foregone conclusion to you, to the character it is likely something that they never thought would happen. Losing a limb is like some strange fantasy becoming ...


2

FYI, there is a gaming company called Choice of Games. They have quite a number of these CYOA games available on the web and for tablets, etc. The really useful part is that they have a tool that is free for authors to use to create their own stories. This may or may not be useful for your purposes, but I'm betting they have information on how to structure ...


2

When you say syntax and grammar for a poem, I'm not completely sure what you mean. Are you talking sentence structure, for example, or about the various techniques of sound and phrasing that are more likely to appear in poetry, such as rhyme and alliteration? For the sake of argument, I'm going to assume you mean the latter and then course correct if you ...


2

I love writing excuses and highly recommend listening. It has great tips, great advice, and a peak into the world of professional writing for those of us that haven't quite made it there yet. But, it is what it is, a 20 minute weekly podcast. This isn't nearly enough time to cover any topic in great detail. They are very strict on keeping to their time ...


2

If you read some of the newspapers written at the time, you might notice that the level of literacy expected of the reader was higher than it is now. The level of discourse was higher. If you want to represent some of the excesses of the period, F Scott Fitzgerald wrote quite a few fine works that capture the era. John Steinbeck wrote well of some of the ...


2

This depends on how obvious you want to make it. I'm going to give two suggestions, of which the latter is by far my favorite, but is also less subtle. Option 1: Just describe what a speaker says in the three different levels. Don't draw special attention to it, but write dialogue differently than you normally would by giving more statements of the speaker ...


2

The purpose is to avoid repetition of modal verbs and make the writing more persuasive. I think you're barking up the wrong tree. You're relying on your individual sentences to persuade people when you should look at your entire essay. It doesn't matter to most people whether you say "the parliament should pass the antiterrorism bill" or "it is incumbent ...


2

The Wikipedia history of campaigns against singular they gives quite a few examples of stylists from the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. Note that prescriptions of language such as these rarely matched what common people actually said and wrote, and arguably had sexist motivations (for the particular case of third person pronouns). If you want to match ...


2

There is software for the Mac called (unoriginally) Narrator from Mariner Software, who have several niche apps aimed at writers, authors, and especially screenwriters. It uses the various text-to-speech voices on the Mac, assigned to characters in a script. Characters can also be assigned with no voice, to create silent gaps in the audio where an actor can ...


2

I haven't been able to find a book, per se, but I have found a couple of resources that might work for your other request be being able to adopt someone else's writing style. I did a Google search on: "history of" "writing styles"; "history of" "writing styles" book. Here are some of the results that seem to fit your wishes best. A writer’s most prized ...


2

Here's a thing you need to consider, a frame challenge if you will. When setting your story in the 1950s, or in the 1920s, or even in the 1800s, your characters can speak the way people spoke back then. In fact, we rather expect them to. But if you set your novel in Shakespeare's time, and one uneducated street child tells another "thou art a boil, a ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible