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34

Usually no. When quoting, it is assumed that you are using the original writer's dialect and spelling, since that is a part of what they wrote. The style guides I consulted agree on that point. APA has a blog post confirming that spelling standards pertain only to your own manuscript, not quoted material: The Publication Manual’s spelling guidelines apply ...


31

If you just need a 'generic' bible quote a widely used version like the KVJ as suggested in several other answers is a reasonable default. However, if you're writing fiction and are using quotations in the context of a character who has a specific denomination you should find out which translations are popular with the characters church. For example, a ...


30

There are some practical problems to consider: 1) Attribution. I don't know who Christiana Baldwin is, but I think that quotation is from Byron, English Bards and Scots Reviewers. 2) Royalties. You might find that you need to pay for your quotations if still in copyright (which of course Byron isn't, but if you go searching for suitable quotations online ...


28

A quote (called an epigraph) is added to the start of a book or a chapter when it adds an insight to the story. What kind of insight is up to you: it might be an additional understanding of events on a meta level, it can be foreshadowing, it can be extra information, etc. It is never a random quote found in google, since that adds no insight. The epigraph is ...


19

This gets back to a basic problem, in that there really is no such thing as The Bible; only translations compiled from various copies (which may or may not be consistent with each other). Using the King James Version, as most (all?) the other answers suggest, is usually a reasonably good compromise, so its not bad advice. The KJV has a lot of problems, some ...


13

Format it the same way, with blockquote indents, and if you can add a little dialogue before and after, you don't have to worry about weird quote mark placement. Bilbo stood and cleared his throat. "I have a new poem for you all," he announced. "It goes thus:     All that is gold does not glitter,     Not all those ...


12

The easy part: According to MLA Handbook, you cite a movie as: title underlined (we often use italics instead of underlining), director, distributor, and year released. You may mention writers, actors, and/or producer. Example: It's a Wonderful Life. Dir. Frank Capra. Perf. James Stewart, Donna Reed. RKO, 1946. For a TV series, they say title of the ...


10

Because you are attaching your speaker tag to the dialogue being spoken. If you were using an action tag, or separating the speaker tag from the dialogue, then the quoted material stands alone and uses a period. Other punctuation varies. Examples: "She's late again," mumbled Jason. [comma] "She's late again." Jason looked down the street,...


10

Go to a local university and speak with a writer in residence or a professor who is well-respected. Take creative writing courses and listen to the feedback. Join a writers group - but remember, being told that your work is far from perfect is the point. Poetry is such an intensely personal and universal form that you must just keep writing. Listen to ...


9

No, it would not be appropriate. It's quite possible that nobody would check you up on this, but quote attributions are expected to be, you know, correct. Mis-attributing a quote might be an honest error, but it's more likely to be a case of insufficient research, or even intentionally lending weight to your work by leaning on an existing respected ...


9

First of all, this is a much deeper and more contentious question than you probably anticipated, especially if your audience takes the Bible very seriously. See this answer here on Christianity.SE that attempts to break down some of the ways that English translations differ, and the reasons behind them. For your purpose, though, it sounds like your major ...


9

Copyright is copyright. There are rules that vary depending on your location, and the way in which you make use of the copyrighted material. In the US, check out the copyright law at https://www.copyright.gov/title17/ In general, quoting very brief parts of very long works is not going to be a problem, like a character saying "One ring to rule them all." ...


9

Don't plagiarize, paraphrase. Take the paragraph, figure out the main idea, and express it in your own words. If it's important that it be exactly as it was in the original, quote it and cite it. In fact --as mentioned by Jason Bassford in the comments below! --even when paraphrasing, you typically need to cite your source unless you're changing the ...


8

You could use empty brackets with a space between them. Brackets are generally used to alter a quote inline, such as fixing grammar or to add information like a name so the quoted material will work within the context of the piece quoting it. "desire[ ] all people to be saved" or don't quote that word: It is possible for God to want "all people to be ...


8

For your "Houston" example, definitely not if Apollo 13 is not culturally relevant to the person saying it. You can use some sayings from this universe in your universe, for example Keep your friends close and your enemies closer. Because this could come about without someone having seen The Godfather Part II. It's just advice. But any quote or saying ...


8

You have two choices: Write it up in the same style as the other quotes but don't give an attribution. It is common enough for writers to put something poetic or otherwise different from the main chapter text in the beginning of a chapter. Give a full citation, including the name of the work it came from. If it's unpublished, then it's just the author ...


7

There are two issues here: legal and literary. Legally, if the quote has fallen into public domain, there's no problem. If not, you're into the whole nebulous area of "fair use". Someone could conceivably sue you for copyright violation for stealing his quote. As we're presumably talking about quotes that are a sentence or two and not dozens of pages, I ...


7

If a word is changed or added, it's placed in brackets. ([]). However, this is typically only done to clarify, usually when context has been removed. For example, if Alice was talking about Bob and we had Alice giving a direct quote of "He said that he had sent the message", we could write it as "[Bob] said that he had sent the message." We couldn't say "[...


7

Yes, you are correct. See here for length of copyright: https://www.copyright.gov/help/faq/faq-duration.html "Fair use" is complicated ans subject to interpretation by the courts, but for the general principles, see here: https://www.copyright.gov/fair-use/more-info.html In any case, if the copyright has expired -- and if you're talking about a 200 year ...


6

A minimalistic approach is to place the character's name in quotes: Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur... – “John Sheridan”, Babylon 5 A more-proper method is to mention the character-name in quotes, the work (or series and episode), and the author. Here is an example from a literary quotation ethics webpage: “We are all brothers under the skin—...


6

Definitely - not just a phrase but at least a paragraph discussing the language, possibly detailing some characteristic points of it, early on. Also note - they aren't necessarily errors. That's a dialect, and as long as the spelling and grammar is true to that dialect, it's not erroneous; it just isn't Standard English. Think of it as quotations in a ...


6

No, the complete sentence includes the quote and the attribution: "That's what," he said. "...with a pound of grapes and nothing more," she said. "Where do you think you're going?" said Mother.


6

Advice that I was given when younger is that when generically quoting the Bible in English, one should always use KJV or NKJV since they're the most widely-known English translations. As it was explained to me, KJV is culturally-accepted as "the Bible" among English-speakers, even by those who don't recognize its authority. This is advice I've taken to ...


6

This is called an indirect (or secondhand) quote. Typically, the advice is to replace it with a primary quote if at all possible. But in an oral recollection like this, it might not be possible to recover the primary source. If possible, I'd suggest NOT placing the putative quotation in quotation marks, which are usually reserved for exact quotes that you ...


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