New answers tagged

0

Colon in writing, not in speaking! I have noticed lately people speaking a colon-like inflection into the word preceding an implied colon. This sounds like the person split "like" into two syllables. In speaking it is better to use a pause without added inflection on a word that is not contained within the word itself. Example--"When John goes ...


0

I think that's fine for informal things, but if you were to write an english paper like this it would be marked down. For book writing though, I have mixed opinions. If it's in dialogue, then it would probably be okay but you could also replace it with; "Is that what you call talking and stuff?" He yelled at the top of his lungs, face red and ...


0

‽ Question mark + exclamation mark is a relatively common combination of punctuation marks, although usually it is written with the question mark first "?!" There is even a proposed new merged punctuation mark covering this. It's called the "interrobang," and you can find it in some fonts (although I've never actually seen it used "...


-1

You mean have a ? or an ! with a quote denoted by " ? Yes you can do that. But your example is not balanced wrt " symbols. Done properly a sentence might even end with !?". Although the interrobang symbol might replace the !? double character when typeset. NOTE Many English profs would disagree but they are fighting a losing battle to keep ...


0

Ah well. This serves as a lesson in reading the question thoroughly. :( This answer may have a bit to do with transcribing. There are a few places where you can put periods even if the person talking may not pause that long. But the fictional part is of course not useful for transcribing. Sorry about that! (I'll let it sit if someone ends up here with a ...


1

For standard dialogue tags, it makes no sense. Said John. does not make any sense by itself. However, a character action in between dialogue does make sense by itself: "Hello." John tilted his hat.


-1

Right now it looks pretty bad. If you break it up into smaller sentences and edit those separately, then it might be better.


0

You break them up into shorter stand alone sentences. I recall that I once wrote a sentence that was one page long. Did not notice it but the editor did and pointed it out in a nice way.


2

Usually, when people repeat things or misspeak in speeches, you can do something like this: "I have read every single question and recent hundreds, thousands - hundreds of tips to help students use these questions effectively." Where you break it up with a little dash to show a pause in the speaker's thinking. You could also use periods (...) for ...


4

"Somehow" is an adverb. It is usually placed close to the verb it is describing and can be used without commas as a regular adverb. Your sentence above doesn't require commas. Entering the house, she realized that somehow inside was worse. This isn't a "rule," but it's fairly common to see "somehow" used at the beginning or ...


1

Yes, you need a comma there. "came down" is acting the role of "said" in that sentence: it is direct dialogue.


Top 50 recent answers are included