New answers tagged

1

Sorry for bothering everyone -- I found it! It's called Discourse Blog. https://discourseblog.com/turning-the-page/ It is a left-leaning writing cooperative that seeks to remunerate their contributors fairly. There is also Defector, a sports website with a similar ethos. Now that I've spent 4+ hours scouring the Internet, I'm going to see what it's like ...


1

So far have found 2 sites that match the description, although I doubt either of them are the one you're looking for. DistanceWeb which has a vaguely yellow theme and starts with a D nDash which is also a vaguely yellow theme and has a D. If I find more I will edit them in below; nothing else yet sorry :(


1

It's certainly possible to write children's books of any length. However, all other things being equal, publishers tend to prefer shorter books, because they are cheaper to print. Clearly, however, a book can't be too short, or the reader will feel cheated. For an adult audience, the minimum length of a novel starts around 55k words, so something in the 65-...


1

Children's books can be a bit longer than that as long as they don't get too adult. Harry Potter started out for children and became young adults, but before it made the jump from "children" to "YA," some of the books were more lengthy. If you don't want/see that happening you need to keep the theme appropriate for children. You can ...


0

There is no right answer. You can do something as short as 100 pages if you want, or go beyond 300 pages. There's the Percy Jackson series(plus all the other series in the same universe) that are about 200-300 pages each. There's the Harry Potter series which get longer the farther along in the series you get. There's shorter stories that hover around 100 ...


1

It's not too long if it's good enough. I had a look on my shelf and I can see a couple of the Skullduggery Pleasant series that are long. The last of the Raven's Gate series is seriously long. However, I think you might be able to cut some of the words. Start with description. If you have any paragraphs of just description, consider cutting them down to a ...


2

The changed book would merely be a new edition of the original. It would not be a new book. And they want a new book, unless your book hits the big time and draws attention of publishers. You would certainly have to tell them because there would be serious legal complications if you tried to sell it as an original and they discovered it was published in an ...


0

I have no idea. BUT here is what I would think you could get away with. I would go ahead and make sure you can add a few more pages of story to what you have now. Probably you should be able to increase the length by 3-10%(shorter books should be lengthened more). Instead of just tacking three extra chapters on the end and a long epilogue, you can go back ...


0

Better late than never... The realistic answer to your question is NO. Tabloid / A3 is much larger than reasonably priced POD houses can handle. You might have to try a company that specialises in large books, like atlases. Alternatively, you can go down the Do It Yourself route. Most local printshops (in the US, Staples, Office Depot or UPS Store) can ...


1

In MS Word, Ctrl+Enter inserts a page break (moves on to a new page). There are also options in the 'Layout' tab for various types of section break, although I'm not fully sure what advantage these would have over normal page breaks (unless you're using the 'start on next odd-numbered page for example). As per @F1Krazy's comment, whether or not you like MS ...


0

Depending upon the country you're in, this could amount to a confession. You could end up in legal trouble. It's best to check with a local lawyer.


12

Use a pseudonym When writing Red Dwarf, Rob Grant and Doug Naylor used the pseudonym of Grant Naylor for their work. This avoids the problem of whose name comes first, by using a single arbitrary name as author. Neal Stephenson took the same approach when he collaborated with his uncle George Jewsbury to write Interface, using the pseudonym Stephen Bury.


7

It's complicated Usually, on novels, names go in order of importance or popularity. It's good to be honest about this - if James Patterson and a small author co-author a book, you know that James Patterson's name will go first and appear largest on the cover. It won't be marketed as "[other author] and James Patterson's book" - it will be marketed ...


1

The majority of memoirs are by famous people, because they are the ones who have a built in audience. It's possible to sell a memoir as an unknown if you have an extraordinary life story, but it's not common. If you're in the second category, you'll need to be a really good writer, and you'll need to write your own story as if it was a novel --meaning it ...


1

While it's true that many people are writing memoirs these days, the key to publication is having a story worth telling--and often that comes down to how you frame it. Nobody cares about your whole life (sorry, but it's true). But if you can tie your experience to a larger cultural or geographic backdrop, it starts to get interesting. For example, racism is ...


-2

Rather than translating from UK to US English, I think a glossary would be a better idea. It would clarify things for non-UK readers, and also give them insight into our culture, just like we get insight into US culture.


3

What you’re writing would be termed a memoir. What you’ll find is that in general, for publishing a memoir at any major publisher (and many minor) you need to get an agent. To get an agent for a memoir (and all of this applies to fiction as well), you will need a complete manuscript as perfect as you can get it. These are non-negotiable prerequisites unless ...


-1

I'm British and had to give up reading books on the Internet Archive because of this. Changing the spelling is one thing, but some publishers are so aggressive in their "translations" that the story no longer makes sense. They'll grudgingly leave in the fact that the story is set in London but that's it. One publisher claimed to love a certain ...


8

Here are things to consider while deciding whether or not to repeat information: How much overlap is there between the audiences of the two books? If your two books are Cooking for College Students and Cooking for a Family of Five, then you should assuredly repeat the information, because most people only belong in one of those audiences, and therefore will ...


2

Well, it depends on exactly how much information is being repeated in your other books. For the most part, readers will want new information in the book they purchased. That doesn't mean you can't have any old information. One way would be to acknowledge and build on the idea that was in the last book. For example, if it is a self-help series, you could ...


23

If you don't have a contract, the "publisher" might not even own any of the rights to the book. Is there a copyright page in the book? If so, who is the copyright registered to? In the case that you don't own the rights, you might be able to just ask for them to be returned to you by the publisher. It's not unusual for previously published material ...


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