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-1

In my opinion, a new york times bestseller is a book that meets the readers' common interests. A book that is well-liked by many people all over the world, therefor becoming a best seller.


2

Yes. I have used Duotrope extensively for about 4 or 5 years. Most of my publications (poetry) have come through journals and small press publishers that I found using Duotrope. While you can do some searching (I think) without paying, one of the things that membership gets you is a look at the statistics for the market. If I see a site that doesn't ...


4

Is publishing my story like this likely to be successful? I doubt it, I doubt enough Kindle readers would be interested. If by "published" on Kindle you mean sold on Kindle, I think you have a marketing issue. Sold at what price? Who is going to buy the first installment, knowing it is not a complete story? Thirteen episodes, at 99c, is $12.87, almost ...


1

If you were a university lecturer deciding on the course textbook, would you choose a self-published one, no matter how good you thought it was? If you were a reader looking for a book about a particular IT subject, where would you look? If you found a self-published title, would you be likely to buy it? What are the less ten books you have bought? How ...


8

The publishing model you're suggesting isn't actually all that new. Serialised novels - novels published in newspapers or magazines, one chapter at a time - were very common back in the 19th century, starting with Charles Dickens' publication of The Pickwick Papers in 19 monthly instalments between 1836-37. Novels published this way include Arthur Conan ...


3

In academia, traditional publishing is a signal to readers that a book may be trusted. When I'm studying science or technology (and reading textbooks), I am usually not yet able to judge whether a book presents the current consensus of the scientific or technical community or contains misleading falsehoods. Self-published academic works give the impression ...


0

I'm sure it's possible in principle to get an agent without even an outline, just by sending a letter written in crayon. Anyone can call themselves an agent. There is no licensing, no requirement of work experience or a diploma in a certain subject. There are people who will take your money in return for acting as your literary agent. (Hint: don't use them.) ...


2

To add a slight frame challenge to the mix: You appear to have headed off in an awkward direction by wondering if you can take an outline and some reasonably polished directly to an agent. And while technically you can try, that route is highly unlikely to yield you anything more than polite smiles and nods at best. [And being black listed as an annoying ...


27

As Mark says, not without a track record of one bestseller after another. But if you got that, you should be pretty rich, so why bother? Rowling and Stephen King probably don't worry about stuff like that, they'd rather NOT be on deadline, just in case a film deal comes along or they get a different idea. They'll just finish the book at their leisure and ...


1

You are allowed to use new ISBN stickers on existing books. As defined by the ISO Standard, the ISBN publisher prefix (or "root" of the ISBN) identifies a single publisher. If a second publisher subsequently obtains an ISBN from the assigned publisher's block of ISBNs, there will be no change in the publisher of record for any ISBN in the block as ...


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