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0

There are no universal rules. If your organisation has a style of its own, follow that. Otherwise, go to any library or bookshop and look closely at however many books it takes to show clearly how others have already done it.


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As a reader I'd buy a collection of short stories rather than a single story in this case. When buying a single short story the organizational overhead and cover work will have a relative larger impact on the price. With a collection I expect to get a better deal. I wouldn't worry about the cover design. The challenge is finding your publisher. Search for ...


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Publishers and agents get a LOT of queries. So any extra information that can help them focus in on the most promising material is helpful to them. They aren't going to read everything, so they use these gatekeeper-asks to winnow down the slush piles. They aren't there to be fair, or to reward the deserving. They are running a business, and they are looking ...


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I don't think this would be a problem, personally. If you do find that your beta readers are struggling to pronounce "Thibodaux", or a publisher advises that the name may be an issue, a simple solution would be to include a sequence in the book where another character pronounces it wrong and Thibodaux corrects them. As an example, Harry Potter and ...


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Sorry, Amori L; 1970s or 1950s or 1920s or longer ago perspectives are in no useful way different, for the simple reason that the technology is relevant to printing, not to publishing. It simply doesn't work the way you suggest (and crucially, where did you get those ideas?) There are three roles involved: author, publisher and printer… they could be only ...


2

I have written somewhere between a dozen and a score non-fiction books, going back to the 90s, for several different publishers and imprints. All of these involved a contract before writing started. The process was: write the text, in Word with particular styles applied that the publisher uses. Eg for a chapter title, or a picture caption. prepare the ...


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The author's rights and responsibilities are spelled out in the contract they sign with the publisher, whether standard, vanity, or otherwise. These contracts also spell out who owns the rights to publication as well as copyright protection. For example, a publisher contracts with an author for a book that the publisher wants to distribute nationally as well ...


2

Let us first of all note that this scenario assumes a writer who has a contract for the book. For that, the answer is, yes, the publisher can edit to the book to its standards, and generally does. This is not only formatting, from the font onwards, but can be other alterations to the book. (And nowadays, the publisher expects it in electronic format.) ...


1

Will this drive readers away? Yes and no. It all depends on your implementation, and you have to thread a needle. At the very start of your story the reader doesn't know or care for your characters yet. It's only logical to use the first few chapters to accomplish this goal. What's your character's job? In what sort of place does the character live, and ...


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Have you seen the movie "Boyhood"? A good example of a fictional life story, that probably has elements of the writer's real life in it. You can insert your entire life. If it is branded as fictional, no-one can say what's real and not. If you're currently as suspect of the crime in question though, I wouldn't do it. Pretty sure it could be used as ...


3

As a practicing attorney myself, everything people have said regarding contacting an attorney first, particularly one that deals with criminal law, is the best advice. If you are contacting the attorney regarding crimes you have committed or been an accessory to, you have the attorney-client privilege, and the attorney cannot discuss it with anyone but you. ...


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I think this is strictly a legal matter, specifically laws on whether or not an autobiography can be considered testimony. That may vary by your location. Definitely look for that on a law site though.


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Isn’t that what pseudonyms are essentially for? Otherwise write it as a fiction novel. But if you really want your real name to be attached to a true story... well, who would bother prosecuting you? You think that law enforcement officers have nothing better to do than comb through memoirs to find evidence of illegal activities? .... Of course if your book ...


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