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I also run a small erotica site for amateur writers. Anyone can access our library and read user submitted stories. If anyone wants to post stories, they just simply sign up. Our users have access to a personalized dashboard, forums, writers desk, faqs, and more. This is all free. Eventually we will add affiliate marketing, but as of now (July 2021) our site ...


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Publishing and promoting go hand in hand, and when you are ready, a strategy of promoting your work makes sense since it helps to move readers to your books or blogs. If you believe your work is worth paying for then you can submit it to journals and magazines appropriate for your genre. And, if they feel the same way about your work, then they'll buy 1st ...


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It varies by publisher. Poetry books tend to be either chapbooks (which can be anywhere from 10–40 pages with variations possible at both ends of the range) or full-length collections which are often specified as 60 pages or more. Yes, there is a hole in the middle. If your collection is meant to be short in length, what you're looking for in publication is ...


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What I've understood, with the disclaimer that I have less experience of non-fiction, is that it's easier to send in a proposal or synopsis or half-done manuscript when doing non-fiction. For fiction, you always finish the first draft and edit it several times before sending it to a publisher or agent, if you want them to take you seriously. At least if it'...


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I that would be a prose poem. Although you might be able to market it as either if needed. But that label is from a creative writing course it took. Really, it falls into a few labels. Poetry, particularly ones with narratives, can get confusing. However, it is the style of a prose poem that make it a prose poem. Now my word doesn't mean much here, but I'd ...


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