20

The editor is there to make sure the publisher is happy with what they're publishing. This doesn't always coincide with what the writer wants to say, but the reasons for this will include many that don't involve the word "better" except when it's followed by the word "fit" - house style and a knowledge of the readership or intended market being obvious ones. ...


20

Anthologies are often different from other publishing. It is common for small publishers or even individuals to put together a call for an anthology to include any short work: comics, artwork, poems, short stories, essays, even novellas. The author never pays the publisher for this. It is normal for the publisher to offer a flat payment (usually token) or ...


17

Assuming you aren't self-publishing, all concerns about the font-size and typography belong to the final publisher (unless you're playing fancy games with fonts, which is rare, and probably not a good idea for most authors). Instead of worrying about pages, you should focus on word count. 50,000 is generally considered the bare minimum for a viable novel (...


15

IANAL, and you should ask a lawyer (and in the future, please, never ever again sign a contract you do not understand), but for me it reads like this: You will retain all rights to the content of the Work. We do not own rights to your Work ... You haven't sold any rights. You still hold every right of your work. Which includes publishing it elsewhere. ...


15

A publisher that primarily makes money from authors, not from sales, is called a "vanity press." These are generally not considered real or legitimate publishers in the industry. However they do serve a niche --for writers who just want to see their work in print, who aren't looking for the prestige of a "real" publisher, who don't want to do the work ...


11

You should write in whatever language you are most comfortable with. Personally, I find that one of the biggest downfalls in writing is worrying about your audience too much. You will eventually build everything around trying to appease your readers, making the story you're writing seem stale and boring to yourself. Or, you will lose yourself in fixing tiny ...


11

It changes from editor to editor and from writer to writer. There are stories where the original manuscript was completely turned upside down by the editor. A very famous case in Italy had the young writer submit a novel written in first POV, and the editor changed the whole thing into a teenager diary (in agreement with the writer, of course, not behind ...


11

A This answer has been given multiple times before on this site, and it was consistently met with reservation and disbelief. Yet it is what I have learned from published authors: First novels are consistently rejected because they lack quality. Writing is something that you have to learn. And it is something that you learn through practice, that is, by ...


10

Before you sign anything, read Kristine Kathryn Rusch's series on "Dealbreakers" -- clauses which, if they are in your contract, should make you walk away from the deal. For example, here's one about agents and the contracts you make with them. She doesn't seem to have a handy link where you can read the entire series, but this link comes close: http://...


9

I think I read this in the Sell Your Novel Toolkit, but I may have seen it elsewhere: Retail stores have limited space. Debut authors (except for a very limited few) have very limited shelf space. You might get 3 books on a shelf (300k words of paper). But you're only selling 2 books with 150k words, not 3. So all of a sudden the risk just went up for the ...


9

I'd also say it is worth seeing what "light editorial" is about. It might be worth asking what is driving them to change, I'd ask about a few (three) specific changes you see as critical that are ruined by the editorial changes. If you can understand the nature of their concerns, you might be able to generalize them enough to address them by making your ...


9

I see no reason why not; agents have no bias against foreign writers, they want good stories. You seem to have a command of English, and you obviously have Internet access. The technical details of you getting paid (if the agent sells your work) is easily solvable, on our end at least (American), I don't think your country is sanctioned by us (sanctioned ...


9

I agree with Mark Baker, and Chris Sunami. It sounds like a scam. We have an equivalent thing in Academia, unfortunately it IS common for scientific journals to charge authors for publication, and there are some out there (junk journals) that will take anything, including complete gibberish (that has been tested multiple times), they will publish it online, ...


8

I spent some time in Oman and Kuwait this year and in Egypt a few years back and found the people to be extremely welcoming and lovely. When I look around York I see many people from other parts of the world - the Middle East included, who appear to be living peaceful and productive lives. From my perspective, you would be welcome to come here, or write ...


6

As long as you don't have a contract specifying that your next N books must be with Copmany A, there's no reason you can't go with Company B. If you mean that you self-published and want to change the imprint, you can do that too; just talk to your accountant to make sure you aren't garbling things for tax purposes.


6

Make sure it is possible for prospective business partners to reach you. Create a website for your pseudonym where you advertise your work. Make sure that website is easy to find. Put the address into the copyright information of your book, on the back-cover, into the profile of any social media presences you have, etc.. There are services which allow to ...


6

You can publish them yourself. If you do that, you retain all of the rights to the stories and the book. That way, nobody can get the rights to the book and throw them away. To publish an ebook, you can make an epub file and distribute it through Kindle, Apple iBooks, Kobo, Nook, Smashwords, and other places. They won't steal it. They want to sell it for ...


6

What do you want to achieve with your writing? One answer is to spread a universal (useful to all people on Earth) message to as many people as possible. Then you can write in English. If you want to change your particular society, then you can write in your mother tongue. If you like a particular genre and want to have fun writing in it, write in the ...


6

An editor should NEVER rewrite. What they should do is make suggestions on how to improve the writing. The writer will not always agree or even want to make changes. And I say this as someone who has done editing on NY Times Bestsellers. Had I changed what she put, she would have hurt me. Instead what I did was point out logic errors, spelling errors or ...


6

How can you be sure your employer is telling the truth when she says there's no money for bonuses this year? Or your local farmer's market farmer who says the early rain messed with the harvest and that's why the squash is twice the price it was last week? How can you be sure that a writer, famous for books about how authors should follow his advice to ...


5

First, Some Points to Consider Editors are very busy, of course, so you only have a sentence or two to get their attention. Attention Getting Concept In order to get the attention of an editor you need to be sure you are writing on a concept that is current, valuable and a large number of people are interested in, but is focused enough that it is a book and ...


5

With those terms, you can publish it with another publisher SIMULTANEOUSLY. You just can't take Partridge's formatted version, after they've done the work of formatting your text, and let someone else publish the exact same thing. The .txt or .doc (or whatever) file that YOU made, that you originally brought to Partridge, is YOURS, and you can take THAT to ...


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