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2

I've always been a "prisoner of inspiration," but I've at long last come to understand/accept that there are technical, skill-based things that you can do to create those perfect scenes --you don't have to wait for the stars to align and your soul to speak. First really understand your characters, setting and scene. You don't have to plot everything out ...


2

You might consider that piece of writing from the perspective of your readers. Forget about what you wrote, then read other people's feedback; try to personally connect with the impressions they describe in the context of a person reading a piece of written work. Then read that part of your work keeping their 'reviews' in mind, but without your memory of ...


3

There's no straightforward approach to anything involving writing, so it's going to take time and effort regardless of how you end up considering the matter. That said, by my experiences, there are two primary writing approaches by which someone can create a memorable scene: With the first approach you develop the scene naturally, as an outcome of a ...


0

Context matters here -- if your overall tone is one of cool detachment, then you do indeed need to detach yourself, and "simply report", and let the reader supply their own feelings about the death. Those are going to be more likely tilted toward anger, pain, and resentment if the character was sympathetic. This is much harder to do well. But if you're ...


5

It's called Writing In Flow. There are some things that happen when creativity is unleashed within yourself. This state of Flow and the opening up of our creative selves is explained in two great books: Flow: The Psychology of Optimal Experience by Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi. He is the one who first explained this experience and wrote that book to help ...


4

First of all, not every scene in every work will have your heart and soul in it. Different aspects of the story will require different things from you. Let the story decide when you need to pour yourself into the scene and reach that euphoria again. But from a writer's perspective, maybe you're not hitting flow state as deeply as you did that day? Is that a ...


3

What did you think when you first wrote that scene? Was it easy or hard? The best scenes in my complete novel are the reveal scenes, because they are fraught with emotion and interpersonal dynamics. To craft a reveal scene, you need to obscure effectively beforehand. I like both of the answers, and will piggyback off of Galastel's comments--write. Also re-...


27

You can't. Do you know Psy? As in Gangnam Style? They tried SO HARD to make comebacks. What did they do wrong? Everything they did after that was a rehashing of Gangnam Style. The cinematography, lighting, even the melody sounded so much like Gangnam Style. I actually liked Psy's previous music but everything after Gangnam Style was just a rehash of the ...


10

You write. If what comes under your fingers is not great, if you're not satisfied, you rewrite. It's easier to find what needs to be improved once you have something, than finding the perfect scene while staring at a blank page. You have no "inspiration"? Write anyway. Inspiration will come. I wouldn't say writing is like a muscle that needs exercise, but I ...


0

A. You don't. B. If you have to, take the character out by surprise. Create a small plot where you are emotionally involved, if you could create a romantic scene, then when the audience is very involved in the plot, all of a sudden death arrives.


0

If you want to show people it's a war game, maybe you play out combat situations, roll dice to see who gets shot and who lives and dies based on the situation and whose number comes up. Literature and especially war and action fiction have had more than their share of contrived forced deaths the authors thought were good thematic ideas, but instead were ...


4

I don't recommend it, but you can take a Hollywood/American morality play approach. Put something in her current or past behavior that is ever-so-slightly corrupted, or slightly off center, or even the tiniest bit not pure-as-the-gently-driven-snow-virginal. When she dies, rather than address the actual situation or the injustice or the randomness-of-fate ...


8

How to kill a character you are attached to? ANSWER: Write a few alternate versions of the scene--in one the character dies, in others the character does not die (coma, loss of limbs, etc). Then get on with the story. After you've written more story, with the anaesthetic of knowing you have versions of "that scene" in which the character does not die, you'...


8

I think this may be a matter of opinion; different psychologies will answer differently. Personally, my characters feel real to me; but I remind myself of a few things. I go back over what I wrote for her, reminding myself that I invented her, all she really consists of is these words on paper. It is like sketching a person, then burning the sketch. In ...


16

You don't detach yourself from the character. On the contrary - you let yourself feel the pain of her death, experience the loss, and you pour all of that onto the page. When a character dies, it should matter. It should be a punch in the gut for your audience. That can only be achieved if you care about the character. If you don't care, if you've detached ...


74

You don't. To put it in more words: the audience has to get attached to make the death relevant. You want her death to be a wake-up call, a touch of realism and a reminder of what war is. Sure, there is no guarantee that your audience will like the same characters that you like. But if you realize that you've grown fond of that female soldier, if you find ...


19

Don't detach yourself emotionally from the character. Rather, experience the character's death as a major part of their arc. This is not a real person who is gone once dead; this is a fictional character, and their entire arc is what makes them who they are. Make the specifics of the death contribute towards making the character even greater, and love the ...


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