52

If your editor says something might look unprofessional, you should listen to your editor. Your editor is a professional, whose task is precisely to make your work appear at its best. We, on the other hand, are a bunch of internet amateurs with good intentions. As @ArkensteinXII mentions in a comment, if you wish to go by "Babs", you can go by "Babs", no ...


10

I do not know the source of that claim you heard, but I think you're taking it too literally. Generally, most authors just use their name. There's nothing about the name "J.R.R. Tolkien" or "Terry Pratchett" or "Ursula Le Guin" that's particularly related to speculative fiction, except after the fact - those names are related to the genre because that's what ...


9

Edward Elmer Smith is not well known but E. E. 'Doc' Smith certainly is, punctuation and all, among the right classes of science fiction fans. As other people have said, brackets may look odd but if you want to go by a nickname then there seems to be no reason not to - though your editor is the expert here.


6

If what you seek is a measure of anonymity, but not to actually hide who you are, you can use your first name and initial. You can be Lois L. or Clark K. Even if your name is highly unique, it is very unlikely you will be recognised by your first name alone. But when you do want to be recognised, you're right there. No trouble introducing yourself. Another ...


4

The given name I've been known by since High School is not the same as the name on my birth certificate or driver's license, but it is, like yours, a known nickname for my legal name. I used to use my legal name on nearly every document but, starting a few years ago, have started using my nickname instead. My legal name is still on my identity documents, ...


3

Presuming maiden is Jacobs, married is Williams: Mary Williams née Jacobs Mary Williams (Jacobs) Mary Jacobs Williams It isn't like space is limited on the cover or copyright pages; I'd use the maiden name in parentheses, or the appellation née (meaning 'originally', but used almost exclusively to indicate a married woman's maiden name). I know at least two ...


2

No. But take into account the context that you are passing to the reader and whether it is the intended one. Also, in countries like USA people have actual names from all over the world. Nobody complains (okay, I guess that a few do, but you get the point). As a woman, I find it very interesting that men would like to try out female pen names. Speaking ...


2

It really is not that uncommon in an online world to use a pseudonym. You're doing it right now, in fact. If you feel it is important to get settled early, though; still don't mention in the initial cold pitch. It is presumptuous, and it really does not relate to the content you are pitching, hence distracting from it. Normally, you'd enter some sort of ...


2

Both J.K. Rowling and K.A. Applegate are examples of people who used simple pseudonyms to write for a target audience (middle school boys) who wouldn't initially pick up their books if they realized the author was a woman, which their given names strongly hinted at. Both women wrote the two most successful series for their target audience, and were aided in ...


1

Lots of people have the same name, but obviously if you published a fantasy novel under the pen name "Daniel Radcliffe" you'd be asking for all kinds of legal trouble. You're better off using a common name (or truly unique one) or else getting the advice of a lawyer who could read some of your work and research the actress to be sure she's not known for ...


1

Picking an Alias, also for Picking a Character Name One approach is to use a common name as your alias. This doesn't have to be Smith or Jones, Here is a list of the Most Common Surnames in North America by country, in the USA "Anderson" is the 12th most common surname, with over 750,000 instances. The same goes for Most Common Male First Names and ...


1

Just use your Initials and last name G.R.R. Martin J.R.R. Tolkien J.K Rowling seems to work well for them... If your last name doesn't have a nice ring to it, just make one up. Or if your last name is too foreign for english language novels (by that I mean Easter, or Middle Eastern), get a pen name. Akhmed Bin Al Shahi --> you might consider calling ...


1

The German author Lucie Flebbe did that: born as Lucie Ringe, she married and became Lucie Klassen, published her first novel under that name, divorced, married again, and published more books as Lucie Flebbe. Those 9 books feature the same persons and are generally considerered as one series. So yes, it is possible, but I'd say it causes more confusion ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible